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post #1 of 16 Old 07-13-2014, 04:27 PM Thread Starter
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European Cabinet System

How many of you have made this style of cabinet? No face frames. Sometimes called frame-less or Euro box.
It's the only type of casework we do in my shop.
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post #2 of 16 Old 07-13-2014, 07:23 PM
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Unless my customers insist on face framing I went to Euro boxes 20 years ago.
So much easier and classy if done right.
You can used protruding fillers, protruding crown receiver, protruding fluted columns between boxes, etc.
Get a nice look with simple to elaborate designs.
The more different depths, the more reveals the classier the look.
Some projects I've done step in or out 4-5-6 times.
Unlike face-framing you can pre-finish, spray all components laying flat for perfect results and assemble everything dry.
I'm sold on this method and the superior 3 way adjustable hinges that were born with it.
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post #3 of 16 Old 07-13-2014, 08:02 PM
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I haven't built a European cab since my 3rd year of my carpentry apprenticeship :-D
I do like them though... the design potential is huge.
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post #4 of 16 Old 07-13-2014, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bzguy View Post
Unless my customers insist on face framing I went to Euro boxes 20 years ago.
So much easier and classy if done right.
You can used protruding fillers, protruding crown receiver, protruding fluted columns between boxes, etc.
Get a nice look with simple to elaborate designs.
The more different depths, the more reveals the classier the look.
Some projects I've done step in or out 4-5-6 times.
Unlike face-framing you can pre-finish, spray all components laying flat for perfect results and assemble everything dry.
I'm sold on this method and the superior 3 way adjustable hinges that were born with it.

+1.






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post #5 of 16 Old 07-13-2014, 09:35 PM
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I'm interested in this to all our cabinets we build at work are like this but we only do laminate cabinets everything we do with wood isn't cabinets or have face frames so how do ou guys prefer to cover the plywood edges and what do you guys use to space all the holes because at work we do it with a Cnc and I need a easier way to do it at home because I don't have any access to one except at work
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post #6 of 16 Old 07-13-2014, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bzguy View Post
Unless my customers insist on face framing I went to Euro boxes 20 years ago.
So much easier and classy if done right.
You can used protruding fillers, protruding crown receiver, protruding fluted columns between boxes, etc.
Get a nice look with simple to elaborate designs.
The more different depths, the more reveals the classier the look.
Some projects I've done step in or out 4-5-6 times.
Unlike face-framing you can pre-finish, spray all components laying flat for perfect results and assemble everything dry.
I'm sold on this method and the superior 3 way adjustable hinges that were born with it.
+2

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Originally Posted by cgp4312 View Post
I'm interested in this to all our cabinets we build at work are like this but we only do laminate cabinets everything we do with wood isn't cabinets or have face frames so how do ou guys prefer to cover the plywood edges and what do you guys use to space all the holes because at work we do it with a Cnc and I need a easier way to do it at home because I don't have any access to one except at work

I typically use pre-glued edge tape with an old iron since I no longer have access to the edge banding machine and for shelf pin holes I use a simple shop made jig/template with a 5mm Vix bit.
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post #7 of 16 Old 07-13-2014, 10:52 PM
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The Euro cabinet just makes more sense. To me face frames get in the way. We like building boxes from 3/4 material, now we have good reason. I like building the kick separate, getting it set and going from there.

In many places in Europe. Kitchen cabinets are like furniture and when they move they take them with them.

Al


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post #8 of 16 Old 07-14-2014, 04:52 AM
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What you refer to as euro cabinets is the standard construction style of cabinets over here in NZ i personally prefer the traditional face frame look though
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post #9 of 16 Old 07-14-2014, 02:37 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgp4312 View Post
I'm interested in this to all our cabinets we build at work are like this but we only do laminate cabinets everything we do with wood isn't cabinets or have face frames so how do ou guys prefer to cover the plywood edges and what do you guys use to space all the holes because at work we do it with a Cnc and I need a easier way to do it at home because I don't have any access to one except at work
We have a fully equipped shop. CNC routers, banders, bore & insert for dowels, case clamp. Try to never use plywood, almost all melamine. Fast and efficient. Plywood has too many draw backs: never flat, varies in thickness, has core voids, separates if you drive a screw in the edge, has to be finished.
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post #10 of 16 Old 07-14-2014, 03:34 PM
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We have a fully equipped shop. CNC routers, banders, bore & insert for dowels, case clamp. Try to never use plywood, almost all melamine. Fast and efficient. Plywood has too many draw backs: never flat, varies in thickness, has core voids, separates if you drive a screw in the edge, has to be finished.
I typically use Melamine as well however when I have a client that prefers wood interiors I use real wood veneered MDF or a composite ply that has a layer of MDF under the veneer. Both are stable, have smooth surfaces with no telegraphing like standard veneer core and are consistent in thickness (I've never had an issue with splitting plywood when I drilled the appropriate pilot hole)
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post #11 of 16 Old 07-14-2014, 03:48 PM
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Some shops are too well equipped, and lose the personal touch with the work. Being familiar with the quirks of sheet goods might make the difference of being able to work with them.





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post #12 of 16 Old 07-14-2014, 10:13 PM
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Here in the States, most shops only use some of the aspects of the 32mm system.

Al


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post #13 of 16 Old 07-15-2014, 05:57 AM
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The other advantage to melamine is its a very hard wearing surface kitchens it takes some real dedicated abuse to seriously damage it
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post #14 of 16 Old 07-15-2014, 11:55 PM
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The other advantage to melamine is its a very hard wearing surface kitchens it takes some real dedicated abuse to seriously damage it
Walraven from CT?
Welcome aboard!
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post #15 of 16 Old 07-16-2014, 01:43 AM
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Walraven from CT?
Welcome aboard!
One and the same
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post #16 of 16 Old 08-23-2014, 09:20 AM
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You'd have to look hard in Canada to find a framed cabinet. BTW we are the clever folks that brought you the Robertson screw.
Cheers!
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