Equipment need to start joinery??? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 04-20-2016, 10:30 PM Thread Starter
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Equipment need to start joinery???

I did alittle wood working when I was younger and now that I am getting away from my automotive hobby (wife) cough cough lol. I am going to start wood working more particular I want to do fine wood working joinery. I know it will be awhile to learn technique and what not.

So my question is what equipment do I need to purchase to get started like small end tables something simple. I am a person that hates to purchase he same tool twice because the first was inadequate for the job or what I wanted to throw at the equipment was to much for it like to weak of table saw or to small of a planer or jointer.

I am also wanting to start learning by hand with hand tools hand planers chiseles hand saws any advice on equipment brand. Power range and what order to buy my euipment in would be appreciated.
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post #2 of 19 Old 04-20-2016, 11:34 PM
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If you have the space and money buy a cabinet model table saw with at least a 3hp motor. It doesn't have to be new. A used one would probably last you the rest of your life. Just be careful not to get one that requires three phase power. Then you will need a jointer. For what you are doing probably a 6" jointer would probably do fine but buy one with the longest table you can find. This is important to straighten long lumber. Brand doesn't matter that much unless you are thinking of Asian made machines. Personally I like Powermatic for a table saw and Northfield for a jointer.
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post #3 of 19 Old 04-21-2016, 01:34 AM
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If I were you I'd check out Paul Sellers (paulsellers.com) and his philosophy of buying tools. Most of what he does is hand powered and now most of what I do is as well. Paul has a ton of YouTube videos and blogs to learn from.
I got back to woodworking myself and started out buying over priced junk then ran across Paul's stuff..
Good hand saw, set of good sharp chisels and build from there. Start with the basics and add on as you need things..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #4 of 19 Old 04-21-2016, 03:36 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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There are 5 basic woodworking machines

You will need these in order of purchase:
10" Tablesaw, either a contractor saw on a stand or a cabinet type saw which is more expensive but more powerful.

6" or wider jointer. The jointer makes straight edges which are necessary for the safe use on the tablesaw. It will also make flat surfaces on a board which are also necessary for safe operation on the tablesaw. Having square edges that are straight and flat surfaces will allow you to make precise well fitting joints.

13" or wider thickness planer. Using rough saw lumber and planing it to you desired thickness will save money and make for better joinery. You don't want to make a jewelry box out of 3/4" thick material, so planing it to a 3/8" thickness will be necessary. You will also want to resaw thicker boards into thinner ones to save material.....

14" or taller bandsaw. This is the best machine for resawing thicker boards into thinner one and is a very versatile tool for woodworking with curved material and for making tenons for furniture easily and safely.

2 HP or larger router mounted in a table for making profiles on the edges of boards or making raised panels for doors. You can also use the router freehand for working with long edges. Templates make duplicating parts much easier.

Of course you will need several saw blades for the table saw and bandsaw, router bits for your profiles, some good hand planes and chisels AND a sturdy workbench with a woodworking vise. Marking tools and measuring tools will insure accurate joinery. :smile3:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-21-2016 at 03:46 AM.
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post #5 of 19 Old 04-21-2016, 06:12 AM
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A nice 12/14" backsaw,a Stanley 78, a handful of razor sharp chisels...and a decent combination square.
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post #6 of 19 Old 04-21-2016, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the responses. I understand all the tools needed But like do I need a powermatic 5 hp table saw that cost 4K or would a jet or grizzly do me just as well and last me many years more in the 800-1500 range. What is a good brand of chiseles and hand planers that keep a great edge and don't chip and I have to buy new ones every year or 2 Stuff like that ? I really want decent equipment that is going to last me my lifetime and not have to worry about when am I going to have to replace it you know.
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post #7 of 19 Old 04-21-2016, 08:47 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Steve for info so don't get a 3phase table saw due to power requirements. I was thinking a 3 hp is what I would need.

And all purpose I have see Paul sellers video and I did check out his website I am going to do more reading later this afternoon.

The one guy I seem to like the most is the man that has videos on YouTube under Woodworking Masterclass seems to do a great job teaching and I like his style seen a few others I like to.
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post #8 of 19 Old 04-22-2016, 09:45 AM
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Somehow I'm thinking of what boat owners say..A boat is just a hole in the water to throw money into..
My shop somedays feels like a hole in the water....
There was a time before electricity when people still worked with wood.

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #9 of 19 Old 04-23-2016, 04:57 AM Thread Starter
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I can relate had over 20k in my street stop car in the end it broke down and sold for less than 5k. I see tools differently seeing how I can keep them as long as I want and get a lot of multiple uses out of them. Even if my I spent 2 5-10 k on shop equipment and only got to build my own home furniture I still would be happy. Seeing how nice long lasting furniture theses days cost around that price tag anyways!!! I mean cheap and okay bedroom set it 1800-3000 dollars for one room so as long as I learn from all of this it's worth every penny. :)
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post #10 of 19 Old 04-23-2016, 05:02 AM Thread Starter
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Did some research and I think these are the tools and brands I want to go with anyone with experience with this equipment advice good and bad would be great to hear.

Table saw.- grizzly 1023rlw 3hp
Jointer - grizzly 6 not sure model number
Planer- dewalt not sure model number it's 400 dollars 3 blades
Bandsaw - grizzly not sure what power is needed for bandsaw


And idle what's a good brand of hand tools for chisels,hand planers, and hand saws ??????
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post #11 of 19 Old 04-23-2016, 07:28 AM
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I have many different brands of chisels from Harbor Freight to expensive German Dastra chisels and I can't really see a difference in them. What you need to focus on is learning how to sharpen them. It's difficult to describe in writing but basically you polish and edge on the chisel and bring it to razor sharp. This is do with a selection of natural Arkansas sharpening stones from coarse to extra fine and then strop them on a piece of leather loaded down with jewelry's rouge. The stones are never used with the honing oil they try to sell. I keep mine in water 24/7 so any steel that gets embedded in the stone is rusted away. This re-news the stone and keeps it like new. The stones I have were bought in the 1970's and still work like new.
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post #12 of 19 Old 04-23-2016, 07:44 PM Thread Starter
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That's what I wanted to know thanks for advice I am not new to sharpening fine edges I will research your method and check it out thanks for the solid advice
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post #13 of 19 Old 04-24-2016, 01:11 PM
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I know first-hand that Lie-Nielsen makes high quality hand tools (chisels, planes, saws, etc.). Many threads beer speak highly of the Lee Valley/Veritas offerings.


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post #14 of 19 Old 04-25-2016, 12:04 PM
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A place to start would be to look at your budget:
How much time do you have to spend?
How much space do you have to spend?

From my example, for years I wanted a really solid table saw. In the meantime, I bought the really basic Craftsman saw with the foldable stand. I think it was around $130. Years later, I'm still using it and don't want the heavy solid table saw anymore. The space I have to use it is very limited, shares floor space with the laundry area, and 99% of the time I carry it up from the basement to use it outside where dust, noise, and "floor space" are no longer concerns. I've never weighed the saw, but it probably only weighs about 40 pounds, if that.

In other words, there are a whole lot of considerations that might not be apparent at the beginning.
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post #15 of 19 Old 04-25-2016, 04:06 PM
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Go to night school for six months and start there...if you can stand that. ..
You will learn if you have the commitment to go with joinery / cabinet making. ...not the next hobby you want to sp##k your spare money on. ....otherwise. ..go R/C with your toys and hobbies bro....cheaper and takes up less space......
Sorry to be direct. ...I did 5 years city and giulds apprenticeship in England 30 years ago.....
Whilst I think my festool tracksaw and domino xl are game-changers.......you'll understand. ..Geeman

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post #16 of 19 Old 04-26-2016, 09:12 AM Thread Starter
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Ya for sure I can understand that space and time and also if I will stick with it :) Well lol I am just now starting college in a month but I did serve 5 years in the army so sticking with something I start is not a problem. I currently rent a house with a decent size garage and that's my space but will be buying a larger home in the future and a shop for sure seeing how all my stuff and hobbies involve cars, large tools or some crazy **** my wife Doesn't want in our house lol. I I am not like most if I spend 10 thousand on tools if I use them only 1 time in a month I am only 26 and I have the rest of my life to get their money worth out of the tools I buy so it is not a waste at all it is an investment that I'll get use out of now or some time in my life. The soon I buy the longer I have to use if that makes since.


Thanks for the advice on good brand chisels and equipment can't stress it enough I hate buying the same thing twice due to poor quality tools
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post #17 of 19 Old 04-27-2016, 10:44 PM Thread Starter
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Any thoughts on a dewalt 735 planer I did some research and found 1 for 300$. I read that they are really good anyone own one I am going to pick it up in the morning if the guy messages me back
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post #18 of 19 Old 04-28-2016, 06:38 AM
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The 735 is a pretty good entry level planer, and 300 bucks is a steal! Jump on that
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post #19 of 19 Old 06-08-2016, 08:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Young347 View Post
I am also wanting to start learning by hand with hand tools hand planers chiseles hand saws any advice on equipment brand. Power range and what order to buy my euipment in would be appreciated.
There are a few books I recommend to anyone interested in learning hand tools.

1) "Working Wood 1&2: The Artisan Course", by Paul Sellers
2) "The New Traditional Woodworker: From Tool Set to Skill Set to Mind Set", by Jim Tolpin
3) "The Anarchist's Tool Chest", by Christopher Schwarz

The third is a fantastic tool reference, but Schwarz's sense of humor tuns a lot of people off.

The first is a great beginners guide: pair it with the Youtube vids, and you'll learn a lot. He comes across as fairly anti-machine sometimes, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Young347 View Post
Thanks Steve for info so don't get a 3phase table saw due to power requirements. I was thinking a 3 hp is what I would need.

And all purpose I have see Paul sellers video and I did check out his website I am going to do more reading later this afternoon.

The one guy I seem to like the most is the man that has videos on YouTube under Woodworking Masterclass seems to do a great job teaching and I like his style seen a few others I like to.
Paul Sellers is the guy who does the Woodworking Masterclass series. I've seen him live a few times, and wish I had the time and money to take a class with him.
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