Enhancing mortise/tenon joint with nuts and bolts? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 28 Old 02-10-2012, 05:58 PM
John
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Kansas
Posts: 3,028
View jschaben's Photo Album My Photos
Whichever way you decide to go, a full, lower shelf adds more than anything to stability.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
jschaben is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to jschaben For This Useful Post:
yankleber (02-10-2012)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 28 Old 02-10-2012, 06:20 PM Thread Starter
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Brasil
Posts: 36
View yankleber's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
Whichever way you decide to go, a full, lower shelf adds more than anything to stability.
Excellent trick!

yankleber is offline  
post #23 of 28 Old 02-12-2012, 08:54 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,083
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Part of my business is antique repair. I've seen the mortise and tennon joint re-enforced with nails, bolts, screws and dowels. Every joint will eventually fail and all of these ideas only tend to make matters worse. Instead of the joint just coming loose where you could reglue it, the fastener tend to tear up the either the male or female side of the joint or both. Then you end up having to remake parts.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 28 Old 02-12-2012, 09:58 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 5
View PoodleHeadMikey's Photo Album My Photos
The essence of mechanical design strength

The essence of mechanical design strength can be summed up with:

1. Spread your materials.

2. Triangulate

A bracket or gusset goes a Long way in stiffening a structure.

As does: 'bolting it to the wall' in this case.. <g>

Making good tight M&T joints is very zen-like and satisfying but for what you are doing with the bench - not at all necessary. And if you glue them - you don't need a bolt. Although adding a tapered thru-peg will make you happy all over again when you remember doing the joint twenty years from now. Even more so if someone notices and asks about it. <g>

Just using a simple glued ship-lap joint would be easy and faster if you just want to get the bench built. <g>

PHM
------


Quote:
Originally Posted by yankleber View Post
Hi!

I am fresh here. I have played carpentry my whole life but always in the wrong way. As far as I can remember every time I made something I tried to burn steps and get the final result in a rush, what means meh stuff.



So you can imagine that my "carpenter life" has a toolbox with dull chisels, wood corners attached with drywal bolts or nails (no joints) and projects with an absolutely lack of blueprints or plans. LoL! I know, a nightmare!



Anyway, now I am trying to start over the right way and the SECOND project in my new woodworking life is a decent workbench. The FIRST project is a wood mallet.

The case is that I have an ugly and wobbly workbench (yeah, no joints!!!) that I have used so far, but it's time to say goodbye to her.

The new one supposed to be made of thick roof beams and will have glued mortise/tenon joints for extreme stability and strength.
Since I am new in the joints stuff, I am still not totally convinced that they can do the job, so (here we go) I was thinking on trespass the joints with bolts and tight everything together with a nut the other side to achieve extra strength, but I am not sure if this is a smart idea.

Question is... Pinning the joints with bolts and nuts will:

1) Enhance the strength of my joints?
2) Weak the joints?
3) Do nothing?



Thanks!
PoodleHeadMikey is offline  
post #25 of 28 Old 02-12-2012, 07:55 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 576
View Midlandbob's Photo Album My Photos
The tension rod idea for firming up a bench works well. I have built a few workbenches using them n the lower stretchers.
Lee valley even sells specialised end bolts for tension rods.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware...31&cat=3,41306 if this link does not work just search foe tension rod nut.
-
I have also used pocket screws together with M&T assembly. I make furniture that I have to ship in parts so the M&T joints can't be glued.
In a 4 inch rail I put in a 2 inch tenon then flank it with pocket screws to hold it all together instead of glue.
It works very well and make the table or whatever knockdown for moving in the future.
There are usually several ways to get where you need to go.
Enjoy.
Bob
Midlandbob is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Midlandbob For This Useful Post:
yankleber (02-13-2012)
post #26 of 28 Old 02-13-2012, 07:57 AM Thread Starter
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Brasil
Posts: 36
View yankleber's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midlandbob View Post
The tension rod idea for firming up a bench works well. I have built a few workbenches using them n the lower stretchers.
Lee valley even sells specialised end bolts for tension rods.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware...31&cat=3,41306 if this link does not work just search foe tension rod nut.
-
I have also used pocket screws together with M&T assembly. I make furniture that I have to ship in parts so the M&T joints can't be glued.
In a 4 inch rail I put in a 2 inch tenon then flank it with pocket screws to hold it all together instead of glue.
It works very well and make the table or whatever knockdown for moving in the future.
There are usually several ways to get where you need to go.
Enjoy.
Bob
Good to know that tension rods works well, but as far as could understand your statement "(...) using them in the lower stretches" it means that it wouldn't be a good idea completely replace the M&T by them?

Also, I have another question regards to the tension rods -- if I couldn't find rods long enough in my local hardware store, I have seen that there is specialty nut that can be used to join two or more rods (picture below). Question if it would reduce the tension strength?

yankleber is offline  
post #27 of 28 Old 02-13-2012, 08:06 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,628
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
tension rods are overkill JMO

They are used in bridges because of the tremendous forces and loads.... work benches don't need them.
You can make clamps using redi-rod like a U bolt using one on each side of several planks in a glue up. Or use several in an rabbeted frame like this:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #28 of 28 Old 02-13-2012, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Brasil
Posts: 36
View yankleber's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
They are used in bridges because of the tremendous forces and loads.... work benches don't need them.
Actually the point is not "need" them...

The point is that it is too much more easier and faster to open a channel along the stretchers than carve M&T joints...

yankleber is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
E-Z pro mortise and Tenon jig Flatty Tool Reviews 3 11-25-2011 07:30 AM
un-tight mortise & tenon joint kjhart0133 Joinery 2 03-21-2010 08:13 AM
Tenon & Mortise The General Joinery 1 04-18-2009 07:46 PM
mortise and tenon help mayday3374 Joinery 2 01-14-2009 09:53 PM
nuts and bolts-storage kesjc General Woodworking Discussion 18 12-22-2007 11:03 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome