Edge Jointing table leaves for big dining room table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 11-14-2016, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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Edge Jointing table leaves for big dining room table

So I'm kind of a novice, but it hasn't stopped me from tackling big expensive projects like the 106" cherry dining room table with 2 leaves. I've already glued up my 4 panels for the table, including the two big pieces and the two leaves. Of course for an extension table, the boards need to be perfectly edge jointed because they aren't getting clamped together nor glued or anything like that. Some alignment pins and some little locks are all I'll have when I put the boards together, but right not there is a 1/32" to a 1/16" gap on the extreme edges of the 48" boards when attempting to put the table together without clamps.

So I DON"T have a jointer. I DO have a table saw, but its the Dewalt Compact Job site table saw. The length of the edge required to be true is about 48", so that table saw won't work.

I do have a Bora 50" straight edge (actually two of these).
I do have a circular saw.
I do have two routers.
I also have a hand plane but I'm terrified of it because I think there is no way I'm skilled enough to do it by hand and I don't want to ruin my project.

How do you recommend I do this edge jointing for the panel/leaf/leaf/panel given the tools i have. (or spending <$100)

The leading thought is using my router along the Bora 50" straight edge and doing it by hand using the router. I don't see how I could use this particular table saw. The circular saw can attach to the Bora straight edge to be converted to a track saw, so that's also a possibility.

Any thoughts or advice on this would be great!
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post #2 of 6 Old 11-14-2016, 04:58 PM
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Why do we have two post of the same thing?

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #3 of 6 Old 11-14-2016, 06:12 PM
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If you can get a track saw...that'll do what ya need. Best option out there. Router is another good one but you'll have to go slow and take off a small amount at a time. Probably a couple passed.
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post #4 of 6 Old 11-14-2016, 07:27 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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the edges need not be straight .... huh?

The boards just need to mate as close as possible without a gap. So what is an acceptable gap... 1/32" works for me.

When you go to the dentist they put marker parer on your teeth and tell you to grind on it which leaves a mark on the high spots. You can do the same with the board edges. Mark one board with a wax crayon that will transfer to the adjoining board when rubbed together. This will show you where to hand plane.... huh? Hand plane? Yep.


You'll need a flat board or large flat surface to lay the boards on for support and to keep the plane body at 90 degrees to the edge. It's better than planing the board vertically freehand. You can also attach a side plate to the plane as a guide to keep it vertical. Either way will work and you need only take very thin shavings. Keep using the transfer process and you will see the progress almost immediately. This will work easier on a large flat surface, rather than holding the pieces vertically in a bench vise or clamp.

You must keep the boards in the same relationship after this process since they are "mated" to one another, not to anything else.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-14-2016 at 07:31 PM.
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post #5 of 6 Old 11-14-2016, 09:33 PM
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Two boards can be joined and it doesn't matter whether the edges are straight as long as they fit together with no gaps.

This does not hold true for a dining table with two leaves, you now have six edges that must actually line up with 6 other edges, so each edge must be straight.
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post #6 of 6 Old 11-14-2016, 10:22 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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You are correct

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Two boards can be joined and it doesn't matter whether the edges are straight as long as they fit together with no gaps.

This does not hold true for a dining table with two leaves, you now have six edges that must actually line up with 6 other edges, so each edge must be straight.
My mistake since the same edges will not always be mated at all times. For example when only one leaf is used the edges are different than when none are used.

A transfer technique can still be used with a straight edge like a 48" aluminum level. Apply a strip of masking tape to the levels flat edge and then rub the crayon on the tape. Use this to transfer the marks to the board's edge and plane off the marks gradually.

A circular saw against a straight edge may leave some tearout along the edge. A router is less likely than the saw blade but may be more difficult to hold constant. A hand plane after the router will smooth out any bumps left by the router.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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