Easiest joint for beginner - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:12 AM Thread Starter
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Easiest joint for beginner

What is the easiest joint to learn for a beginner?

Currently I am just using pocket holes to create a joint and don't want to limited to only one type of joint, but have no idea where to start.

Any direction would be greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:19 AM
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Machine, or hand cut?

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post #3 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:27 AM Thread Starter
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Oh, either I suppose. I just want to be able to do different joints. Just for the time-being lets go with machine. And then I can look at hand later, unless hand is the easier route to pick up and learn.
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post #4 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:31 AM
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If you have a miter saw, I would recommend miter joints.

This will help you get your saw dialed in for accuracy.

Mitered boxes/picture frames.

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post #5 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:46 AM
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My advise is to pick some simple projects... like a workbench if you don't already have one... or another shop workstation or table. Building shop items lets you practice simple joinery like half lap joints and miter or even butt joints. Shop items don't have to be fancy, just functional. As you build your shop, don't throw out your scraps. Cut-offs are great for learning joinery. You can learn the basics and gradually move on to finer joinery like mortise and tenons and dovetails...

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #6 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:56 AM Thread Starter
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Yeah I have a lot of scrap from my first project laying around that I figured I could use to practice on. I don't have a miter saw currently so maybe hand is the way to go right now. I've just been looking around the Googles to find information and thought I would ask here to because there seems to be a lot of knowledge and experience in this forum.
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post #7 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:57 AM
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There are different joints for different purposes. So what joint to learn first depends on what you want to build. Have a project in mind?

Dave in CT, USA
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post #8 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 11:58 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maylar View Post
There are different joints for different purposes. So what joint to learn first depends on what you want to build. Have a project in mind?
Yeah the project that I'm planning currently is my workbench.

Here is the bench that I'm looking at creating.

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post #9 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 12:50 PM
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Let's see... Nailed / screwed butt joints are obviously the easiest, then miters, half laps, pocket screws, dowel joints. Eventually you work your way into dovetails, box joints, mortise and tenon... As you build skill you build confidence, and once you have skill and confidence you can build whatever you want...

Mind you, I still have plenty of uses for pocket screws. No need to go too fancy you know!

Interested in my woodworking, workshop and whatnot? See http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, want to see my other interests such as hunting, fishing, off roading, and camping? See http://wildersport-outdoors.blogspot.com
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post #10 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks dbhost! Yeah, I just want to be able to have the ability to build a variety of things and not get stuck only using pocket holes. I appreciate all the input from everyone!
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post #11 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 02:09 PM
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That's a great look bench, Firefighter, I'm curious how it turns out.

Thanks,
JohnnyRelentless
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post #12 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 02:11 PM
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I think the easiest joints to learn at the start are half laps and dados; and that's only because there are no complications in planning them out. There will be simple additions of stock thicknesses only.
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post #13 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 02:13 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Johnny. I'm excited to get started on it. I've enjoyed watching your bench come to life as well.
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post #14 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 02:51 PM
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As its been said, it might depend on what you are making. For a specific joint there could be several to choose from. In making a decision of which one to use the choice would be to consider the stress, how the parts can be configured, and whether the joint will be one that can be worked to with the fitting of other parts in stages for assembly. But, in the end the joint you pick may be one you feel capable of doing and don't have any doubts that it will be adequate.





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post #15 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefighter4Cy View Post
Yeah the project that I'm planning currently is my workbench.

Here is the bench that I'm looking at creating.


That bench looks very similar to the bench I built almost 30 years ago. I found the plans in a book that Stanley used to put out. It's a great project. I still use the bench today.

Here is an old shot of my bench on the left


Last edited by gadabout; 04-21-2014 at 05:38 PM.
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post #16 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 05:33 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah I just googled workbenches and found this one. The design is simple and the materials aren't too expensive.
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post #17 of 20 Old 04-21-2014, 07:03 PM
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My favorite joint for utility boxes and drawers is the locking rabbet, also known as a rabbet/dado. Great for a beginner
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post #18 of 20 Old 04-22-2014, 12:16 AM
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Glad to see you chose a workbench as your 1st project. I recommend you stay focused on your choice because it is basic and simple and will be an asset in your workshop. The beauty of your bench is its' simplicity... but if you do chose to use mdf hardboard pictured, do add a couple of cross boards in the frame. This will help curtail any sag. I suspect that next year, you will be looking at your bench and wanting to upgrade it. In the mean time discover what you will want to add (dog holes - vises - t-tracks - etc.). Many of us have chosen to add an additional top layer (could be plywood, mdf laminated board, flooring, or whatever). If you add a new surface, don't glue it on, countersink the screws and screw the new surface onto the old.

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #19 of 20 Old 04-22-2014, 02:10 AM
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I made my work bench top from a solid core door and laminated formice on top. Flat and smooth. A 2 inch overhang all around will come in handy for clamping stuff.

Then I added Kreg tracks and drilled holes in it.
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post #20 of 20 Old 04-22-2014, 09:56 AM Thread Starter
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Yeah I'm not sure if I want to use mdf, but it seems like a solid choice. I never thought about adding additional support to the frame. Will definitely do this, thanks Bernie.
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