different titebond glues - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 03-28-2013, 12:16 AM Thread Starter
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different titebond glues

I'm trying to get a handle on the difference between titebond, titebond II, and titebond III. I know three is approved for direct contact with food but also know there has to be other differences.
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post #2 of 16 Old 03-28-2013, 03:37 AM
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this should help

It's a new glue added to the Titebond line. (not called 4 yet) It's called "No run, no drip"
First came the "original" then came 2, used for almost all typical tasks except out doors where 3 is best.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 16 Old 03-28-2013, 04:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GISer3546 View Post
I'm trying to get a handle on the difference between titebond, titebond II, and titebond III. I know three is approved for direct contact with food but also know there has to be other differences.
This might be of some help.





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post #4 of 16 Old 03-28-2013, 09:03 AM
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Go to the titebond site and review the facts.

Simply the higher the number the newer and more water resistant. The price goes up a bit. For most uses I would just buy the TB III as they all have limited shelve life so having all three is less wise. Date the bottle when you buy it. The original cheep wood glues may have a bit of creep so should be avoided for furniture.
The only time I can think of to use the original glues is if you do want a joint that could be taken apart (with difficulty) by steam, water. Things like chair rungs.
They are (to over simplify) emulsions of plastic that turns into an inert sheet of plastic that hold the wood pieces together stronger than the wood-wood bond.
There are several other TB choices if you can find them that emphasize properties like working time. Epoxies and contact glues have their place. Busy shops may have over 10 types of glue for different applications.
They ,I ,II and III are safe and work. Only if you were going to use a lot for an inside job, would I use other than III. I do use Lee valley's 2002 glue..

This link should get you to the TB site.
http://www.titebond.com/Libraries/Li...deTB.sflb.ashx
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post #5 of 16 Old 03-28-2013, 09:19 AM
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Anyone know if mixing the different types would cause problems? I assume it's not a good idea, I'm mostly just curious.
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post #6 of 16 Old 03-30-2013, 08:20 PM
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I would strongly expect you conclusion that it is not wise is correct. They are different compounds so probably do not polymerize with each other. You could go to the titebond site and send a question to their technical folks.
Why would you want to do that? If you had the ends of current bottles, you. Could use different ones on different joints or parts of the same project but not mix the glues.
RHB
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post #7 of 16 Old 04-09-2013, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Midlandbob View Post
I would strongly expect you conclusion that it is not wise is correct. They are different compounds so probably do not polymerize with each other. You could go to the titebond site and send a question to their technical folks.
Why would you want to do that? If you had the ends of current bottles, you. Could use different ones on different joints or parts of the same project but not mix the glues.
RHB
I do have a couple ends of bottles that I plan to use up pretty much as you suggested. Just wondered. I wouldn't have mixed them unless there turned out to be prevailing wisdom that it's okay. In that event, the neat freak in me would have rejoiced and rushed to the basement to consolidate bottles.
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post #8 of 16 Old 04-09-2013, 07:46 PM
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Anyone know if mixing the different types would cause problems? I assume it's not a good idea, I'm mostly just curious.
You could mix them without a problem. I've even mixed Elmers white with TBII when in a jam. Works fine.





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post #9 of 16 Old 04-09-2013, 11:36 PM
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You got lucky.

Elmer's wood glue is a PVA( poly vinyl acetate) glue with some shared chemistry with TB II which is also PVA.
Sorry- but
I would hope the standard of advice given here is based on good information that is science based when possible.
. "I got away with one combination once" ( to paraphrase) is odd advice. The modern glues are different than the early aliphatic resin glues that were probably all similar and might be mixed.
If you are doing a non critical glue up you can probably get away with old glue or odd mixes. I would hate to contribute to a failure in an important project by suggesting ignoring manufacturers directions.
The proper choice and use of glues is a very important skill to learn or teach. We have an impressive array of glues with dramatically different properties.
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post #10 of 16 Old 04-10-2013, 10:19 PM
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You science guys crack me up. If it was that critical I'm sure he'd rush out and buy a new bottle pronto.

Cabinetman is spot on, if in a pinch and it doesn't call for a twenty minute car ride fire that stuff together and see what happens.
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post #11 of 16 Old 04-10-2013, 10:25 PM
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The April/May 2013 issue of Woodcraft has a really good explanation article of the different types of glues and when to use which one. It even has a 2-page pullout centerfold for the shop which breaks it down. I plan on laminating it for safe keeping.
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post #12 of 16 Old 04-12-2013, 12:47 AM
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I don't know the effect of mixing the various types of glue.

HOWEVER

Why would you chance messing up a project with $300 worth of materials over ten bucks worth of glue?

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
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Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
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post #13 of 16 Old 04-22-2013, 01:25 PM
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Nope C-man. This adhesive is a relatively new product and not one of those in Marc's write-up.

This adhesive is intended for gluing end grain and miter joints. Their market is picture framers and trim and molding installers.

Folks should look at the video called out in the second response.

Howie..........
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post #14 of 16 Old 04-22-2013, 01:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burb View Post
The April/May 2013 issue of Woodcraft has a really good explanation article of the different types of glues and when to use which one. It even has a 2-page pullout centerfold for the shop which breaks it down. I plan on laminating it for safe keeping.

Woodworking centerfold!
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post #15 of 16 Old 04-22-2013, 01:37 PM
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Nope C-man. This adhesive is a relatively new product and not one of those in Marc's write-up.
What are you referring to? The OP didn't mention "new product". I didn't read the write up, so I have no idea what you are specifically talking about. My general statement was from mixing different PVA's or aliphatic resin glues (water based) together. I'm assuming you haven't done that.





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post #16 of 16 Old 04-24-2013, 07:58 PM
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Open time and water resistance are the biggest differences between them. But, just check with Titebonds website for the specifics as someone had already mentioned.
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