deconstruct an old door stile - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 09:11 AM Thread Starter
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deconstruct an old door stile

just curious if it is possible to remove the lock stile from an old door and glue in a new one without damaging the adjoining rails/panels?

Its an original door to our 1894 home, but has been moved, cut crooked, drilled, and generally beat up...and i need to add about 1/2" to the lock stile for its original location.

I could patch it all and paint it, but i was interested in staining it, so seeing all of those patches would be less than ideal.

I assume construction in 1894 was glue up (no pins anywhere and no through-tenons) - can it be heated and disassembled or should i not even bother trying.
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Last edited by redline9k; 06-26-2020 at 10:59 AM.
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post #2 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 11:32 AM
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I doubt you could easily de construct that door. What the second photo is showing is a haunched tenon. A haunched tenon does not show the true depth of the tenon, which could be up to the full width of the stile. It may be possible but not practical to route the stile down to the tenon of the rails if the molding was removed to provide no obstruction for the router. My last thought is trying to match the old growth wood that was probably used in that door would be beyond difficult.

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post #3 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the input and the education on a haunched tenon. I guess this door will be resigned to being patched and painted...maybe i can use it somewhere else.
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post #4 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 12:14 PM
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I have seen on the internet where shown how to paint and then inking wood grain onto wood, then a clear finish applied. I did that once on a corner cabinet, but it was an antique white with the wood grain inked on it then oil based clear poly. it looked good at first, but after a while the poly added an orange tint to it due to UV light.

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post #5 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 12:23 PM
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I agree that replacing the stile is likely to be difficult at best, and could end up destroying the door.

Maybe another approach, it's an old door, it has lived a long life, it is not perfect. Patch it nicely and embellish it's scars.

I have scars, I don't hide them, they are part of me just like they are part of the long, interesting life that door has seen.

If you could find another door from that era, and take the patches from it that would be even better.
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post #6 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 12:31 PM
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Interior or exterior door?

Quote:
Originally Posted by redline9k View Post
Thank you for the input and the education on a haunched tenon. I guess this door will be resigned to being patched and painted...maybe i can use it somewhere else.

You can patch and replace buggered up wood, carefully using a router, hand tools and wood as close to original as possible, preferably on an interior door.

Another approach, depending on your skills and available tools, would be to rip down the length of the stile and remove as much buggered up wood as needed, BUT as little as possible to maintain the integrity of the joints. Then the "patch/repair" would be virtually invisible, BUT you would need to remortise the locks, tedious,
but doable.

Yes, the old growth Pine would be hard to come by, but not impossible. Every once in a while I come across a piece of Dour Fir that's got really close grain.

A third approach would be to rip off about 1" or so, leaving the mortises and glue on a "matching" length. It would not be perfect, but pretty much invisible that close to the edge.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 01:50 PM
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Here are 2 other choices. Set up a router track jig so that you can remove 1/8th off the door stile. top to bottom.
Plug the remaining holes with wood or just straight epoxy filler Find a board with similar grain and rip to 1/8" thick and the the width of the stile. Then glue it down in place and that's it.
Another repair would be to start at the upper old hole annd cut straight down to be even with the old existing doorknob and keyhole.
Now start at the top cut line and measure the distance from the outside of the door stile to the right side of the cut. Multiply that distance by 12. Now measure upward from the top of the cut line that new calculated distance and scribe it across to the outside edge of the stile. Do the same for the bottom of the cut. Now just cut that section out and put it aside.
Now trace out the piece and add 1/8" to account for the saw blade thickness and glue that piece in place. With a 12 to 1 slope, the glue line will be all but invisible.
The key to getting a perfect fit is to make a perfect cut.. this will require some form of jig. Mybe just clamp a straight edge to use a router to straighten out/clean-up the line. Ot chisel or whatever you can.

This door repair is not as dramatic as yours, not even close. But, it's the general Idea
This was caused by a break-in.
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Last edited by Tony B; 06-26-2020 at 01:56 PM.
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post #8 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 02:04 PM Thread Starter
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hm, well ok maybe I wont give up yet. I have another door original to the house being unused, sitting in the attic - assuming it was to a door frame long ago removed/moved/etc. Id hate to cut it up, but I suppose its not being used and not going up anywhere as long as I live here.

I guess I could rip down 3 1/2" off the door to remove the deadbolt holes and dado the door/repair and glue together with a 1" spline. There would be a vertical seam, and a shift in wood grain, which is what i was hoping to avoid by removing the stile completely.

Im all for character, but those deadbolt holes would stand out noticeably if they were stained. I think at some point the room was a rental, so thus an interior deadbolt.
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post #9 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 02:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
Here are 2 other choices.
Thanks for the ideas Tony - finished the one door we talked about the other week, now onto the next project.

Youre second idea is interesting, and youre probably right, the angle would be less visible than the straight joint, although I might have to adjust the 12:1 ratio since that would be 42" in each direction.

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post #10 of 10 Old 06-26-2020, 02:13 PM
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By the time you are done, you will be an expert.

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