clamping time for Titebond II glue - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 01-28-2013, 11:17 PM Thread Starter
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clamping time for Titebond II glue

I notice that the Titebond II glue I use has the following statement on the bottle: " ...clamp for 30 minutes."

I am assuming it is stating that clamps should not be used beyond 30 minutes. I follow that mostly but I am wondering the reason behind the statement.

What happens if the glued work is clamped beyond that time lime?
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post #2 of 17 Old 01-29-2013, 12:12 AM
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Clamping time of 30 minutes is the minimum you should leave the clamps on.

And it is temperature dependent. I have clamped for 5 minutes and gotten a stable joint in summer when temps are hot. I have clamped for an hour in the winter and had it fall apart.

Normally in the summer I clamp for 45 minutes and in the winter I clamp for 1:15 If you want you could clamp it for weeks or months, but after about 24 hours it's not going to matter much.

For face gluing in the summer I let it sit for 2 hours, just in case you need that info.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
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post #3 of 17 Old 01-29-2013, 07:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim dort View Post
I notice that the Titebond II glue I use has the following statement on the bottle: " ...clamp for 30 minutes."

I am assuming it is stating that clamps should not be used beyond 30 minutes. I follow that mostly but I am wondering the reason behind the statement.

What happens if the glued work is clamped beyond that time lime?
The instructions should read "clamp for a minimum of 30 minutes."
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post #4 of 17 Old 01-29-2013, 08:24 AM
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Personally I think 30 minutes is rushing it a bit. I think it would have to be very hot weather before I would take the clamps off in that timeframe.
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post #5 of 17 Old 01-29-2013, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by jim dort View Post
What happens if the glued work is clamped beyond that time lime?
No impact on the piece, only on having the clamps tied up if you have several pieces to glue.
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post #6 of 17 Old 01-29-2013, 09:06 AM
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No impact on the piece, only on having the clamps tied up if you have several pieces to glue.
And that is why you can never have enough clamps.

Learning more about tools everyday
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post #7 of 17 Old 01-29-2013, 03:08 PM
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Typically, I'll leave mortise and tenon or edge to edge glue ups in clamps over night.

OR

If it takes me a few days to get back to the shop, the clamps stay on.

If I have a lot to clamp up, then a few hours per piece. I'll try to get three glue up a day.

It doesn't really much matter as long as the piece is in clamps for an hour.

With something other than the TiteBond series (I, II, III) the time may be different. Also, temperatures below 60 may require longer clamping times.

There is on other very important point.

The "Time in Clamps" does NOT mean "Then ready to use". You really should allow the glue to cure for 24 hours or so before putting any stress or strain on the joint.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
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Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.

Last edited by rrich; 01-29-2013 at 03:10 PM.
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post #8 of 17 Old 01-30-2013, 09:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich
Typically, I'll leave mortise and tenon or edge to edge glue ups in clamps over night.

OR

If it takes me a few days to get back to the shop, the clamps stay on.

If I have a lot to clamp up, then a few hours per piece. I'll try to get three glue up a day.

It doesn't really much matter as long as the piece is in clamps for an hour.

With something other than the TiteBond series (I, II, III) the time may be different. Also, temperatures below 60 may require longer clamping times.

There is on other very important point.

The "Time in Clamps" does NOT mean "Then ready to use". You really should allow the glue to cure for 24 hours or so before putting any stress or strain on the joint.
I'm in the middle of a big glue up right now I've been leaving it in the clamps for 24 hr. using tight bond |||
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post #9 of 17 Old 01-30-2013, 10:02 PM
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I've glued up panels in the summer for 10 minutes and then sent them through the planer and then the panel bevel on a shaper. TB II is pretty remarkable stuff.

I was making a newel post out of Sapele'. I was making quite a few of them and batch cut the parts. I was using pocket screws to do the end to edge joint using glue of course. On one of them it seemed way out of square. After further investigation I noticed that the part was about 1/4" to long. Somehow I neglected to final size it.

So about 10 minutes had passed at this time and I removed the 2 pocket screws. I needed to break the joint. Usually I just put it on a flat surface and a few sharp whacks with a mallet, it didn't work. So I put a clamp on the joint and started to crank the rail to break it off. It won't let go. I keep cranking and the long stile is bending pretty good now. Finally it breaks. But not the way I expected, it took a big chunk of the stile with it. And no, the screws were not still in it. I was completely amazed. This was only 10 minutes on a end grain glue up.

But yes, I do agree at least an hour is best. Another thing is that since it is water based the humidity swells the joint and you should wait 3 days before doing a final sand unless you want the joint line to shrink back and leave a small dent on the glue line.

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post #10 of 17 Old 02-02-2013, 09:12 PM
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Jim,

I agree with the reply's about temperature and moisture conditions and I would suggest that you go to the Tidebond web site and look at their suggestions for the glue your using. The Tidebond engineers/chemists respond to questions about their product so, don't hesitate to ask them when your in doubt.
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post #11 of 17 Old 02-02-2013, 09:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris lewis View Post
I'm in the middle of a big glue up right now I've been leaving it in the clamps for 24 hr. using tight bond |||
Exactly and I'm sure that you are delighted with the results.

If it is reasonably warm in your area, an hour would be enough and then tomorrow you can work with the glued up parts. As you have demonstrated, 24 hours in clamps doesn't hurt anything.

Everyone,
From personal experience using TB-III, poplar, Kreg pocket screws and making a face frame. YMMV with other glue.

The joint was an end grain to edge grain. A typical rail and stile butt joint.
The glue was TiteBond III. A good application of glue as the project was paint grade.
The time in clamps (a.k.a. Kreg screws) was about 45 minutes.
There was a screw up and the joint had to be taken apart.

We removed the screws and broke the joint. The only thing weaker than an end grain to edge joint is an end grain to end grain joint. The amazing part was that the end grain pulled some of the edge grain out of the poplar. And that was after only 45 minutes of clamping time. In 45 minutes, parts of the glue had already set up stronger than the wood.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
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post #12 of 17 Old 02-02-2013, 10:38 PM
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I usually leave clamped for 1 hour minimum.

The glue is on a shelf in my laundry during the cold months.

In the winter I let work pieces warm in the house prior to glue up and move them back into the house after clamping.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #13 of 17 Old 02-21-2013, 01:05 PM
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I almost always let the yellow glue set up for a minimum of 3 hours...just to be safe. Never use it in a very cold shop...bad results!
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post #14 of 17 Old 02-21-2013, 01:29 PM
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I almost always let the yellow glue set up for a minimum of 3 hours...just to be safe. Never use it in a very cold shop...bad results!
this is NOT what i want to hear. my garage is not heated, and i have glued a few things recently when it was cold. one time, the leftover frilm on the wood turned white after i wiped off the excess glue. that is probably a sign that it was too cold. so far, they have held ...

maybe i should store the glue indoors?
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post #15 of 17 Old 02-21-2013, 01:31 PM
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maybe i should store the glue indoors?
Yes!

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
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post #16 of 17 Old 02-21-2013, 02:17 PM
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55 degrees for TB II and 50 for TB I

Any lower than that and you are asking for failure. I always bump it 10 degrees from the minimum to be sure. A glue failure is something that you don't want to deal with in a project that is nearly finished.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
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post #17 of 17 Old 02-21-2013, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by trc65 View Post
Yes!
ok ... consider it done.

is the glue that i currently have out there compromised, or will it be ok once it is no longer cold?
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