Buttjoint lip - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 08-28-2018, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
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Buttjoint lip

Hello everybody,

I'm completely new to woodworking (in my adult life at least) and joinery. I have access to a makerspace here in Copenhagen, Denmark, with limited number of tools - more powertools than handtools though.

I'm in the process of making a baby fence for our staircase. I've made buttjoins and am almost done with the initial stuff and have something like this:


The issue i have is that i have a small lip (around 1mm) at the top and bottom of the vertical sides as well as a few places where the vertical parts in the middle does not align perfectly with the top and bottom bars (<1mm).

So to the question:

Can i use a hand powerplaner (Bosch PHO 1500 i think) to take small misalignments and the lips off or is this not the right tool for that? I have ben watching videos of Matt Estlea demonstrating handmade joints and he often planes the joint after it's been done, but this is of course a handplane.

If i can use the powerplaner i would go in and go half way from each side to avoid tearaway and thinnest cut.

If i cant use a hand powerplaner for this then what should i use? Sander, maybe - there is a orbital handheld sander?

There are pencil marks and a few dents in scratches that would need finishing anyway before painting. And i will go around all edges with a a router with a roundover bit.

Hope you can help.

/Jacob
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post #2 of 9 Old 08-28-2018, 10:26 AM
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I think most would sand the discrepancy flush, but using a block plane first would speed the process along.

The hand power planer may prove to be the most difficult tool to control for a small job like this.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #3 of 9 Old 08-28-2018, 06:59 PM
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I wouldn't be using any kind of plane on end grain. Even if you cut from the outside in there would be a certain amount of tearing. Your best bet would be to sand it. You could use a disc sander with some coarse paper and then finish sand it with a finishing or orbital sander. The orbital sander alone could be used however you would have to be careful not to round the edge or end up grinding it on an angle.
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post #4 of 9 Old 08-28-2018, 08:52 PM
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Get or make a disk sander, easiest way to even up the joints without splintering.

http://benchnotes.com/DISK%20SANDER%20/Disk_Sander.html

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #5 of 9 Old 08-29-2018, 03:36 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the replies. I will try with the orbital sander and some coarse paper.
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post #6 of 9 Old 08-29-2018, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKing View Post
Thanks for all the replies. I will try with the orbital sander and some coarse paper.
You might try finer sandpaper first just to see how it goes. Course sandpaper will take off material quickly, but may leave heavy crossgrain scratches that increase the work you must do to finish the project. Somewhere is the right grit to start with. After that, use a finer grit to take out the scratches left by the previous grit. Repeat until done, and don't skip grits.
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post #7 of 9 Old 08-29-2018, 09:18 PM
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I also would recommend hand sanding with just right the right grit and working to fine. I recently was using a no. 4 plane on the end grain of a table top, trying to square up nice before bookending, and I had bad tear out on corner edge. I repaired it and used what was going to be the top as the bottom instead. If I had not tried to shortcut and just used sandpaper and hand sanded to begin with I wouldn't have wasted so much more extra time on the repair and I would've gotten a better looking top, like I originally wanted. Just my novice two cents, but I would definitely steer clear of a power planer or power sander for such a small job, when hand sand is proper.

Regards,
J.D.


Stay Classy
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post #8 of 9 Old 08-30-2018, 04:26 AM Thread Starter
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That's the thing - the powerplaner is really difficult to understand for me. There are a number of common powertools that replace the saw, but the plane is not really replaced by the powerplaner and it's really difficult to find info on it's usages.

Well anyway i tried it just for fun - couldn't resist it. It did work but i also made a mistake with it. Decided to round all edges with a router. Put some 60 grit paper on the orbital sander, sanded down gave a bit rough finist but could easily have been the only tool (except the router) to be used. Sanded again with 240 grit on the orbital and it gave a smooth and pleasant finish. Thanks for all the help.
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post #9 of 9 Old 09-06-2018, 01:51 PM
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Very few woodworkers have or use a hand power planer, most have a disk or belt sander for removing excess end grain material quickly, as for hand sanding, if it makes you feel good go for it.
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