breadboard ends - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 4 Old 04-16-2013, 11:42 AM Thread Starter
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Smile breadboard ends

I understand the traditional method of constructing breadboard ends for a dining table, but I was wondering if it would be feasible, advisable and reliable to construct the breadboard ends with a shallow groove (shallow mortise and tendon) and then use a floating tendon glue only in the end grain (such as the beadlock system or dominos) with them remaining loose for the longer tendons?

Anyone ever tried this? Was it successful?
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post #2 of 4 Old 04-16-2013, 12:16 PM
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You do not need a floating tenon, just glue the tenon only in the middle.

I have read where dowels were used. Middle one glued in top and breadboard end. Outer ones glued in top only and the hole elongated horizontally in the breadboard end.

Another method, but a lot more work is to make the tenon a horizontal dovetail, cut a mating dovetail along the length of the breadboard end, slide over the top and then pin in the middle.
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post #3 of 4 Old 04-18-2013, 08:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by panhandler
I understand the traditional method of constructing breadboard ends for a dining table, but I was wondering if it would be feasible, advisable and reliable to construct the breadboard ends with a shallow groove (shallow mortise and tendon) and then use a floating tendon glue only in the end grain (such as the beadlock system or dominos) with them remaining loose for the longer tendons?

Anyone ever tried this? Was it successful?
As I never stand breadboards, they have two main functions:
1. to cover the end grain and serve a decorative function. This gives a more refined look.
Any method of attachment that allows for the wood movement conflict of perpendicular grain would work.
2. the function of holding the wide board flat:
This would see to demand a significant connection between the two boards. A substantial tenon and mortice walls that are as solid as possible

The centre is fixed solidly with a peg or other fastener connecting the top and bottom of the or mortice walls and the tenon. This can have a narrow area of glue 3-4 inches at most but the glue is on the side grain not the end grain.
The side pegs or pins have sideways elongated holes on the tenon not the mortice. Small dowels or biscuits would have limited restraining power but would work if there were no or only small forces.
The stub tenon mentioned would be better than nothing; it would at least avoid/hide the visual gap between the board and the breadboard.
A floating tenon would seem to have the grain in the wrong direction. A series of domino like connectors might work if they were appropriately sized?
If you were making a "shallow" M&T, why not just make a full M&T? Some type of full width M&T seems optimal.
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post #4 of 4 Old 04-18-2013, 10:05 AM
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I've done the BB's a few different ways. I don't like biscuits or dowels. I like making the tenon as part of the BB. The actual tenon can have a projection of choice, and I don't find seeing the tenon at the ends objectionable. A loose tenon would have the same fitment, but doesn't have the rigidity of a tenon machined on the BB. With that, blind ends can cover the tenon.

This method provides one side of the joint to be rigid. The groove also should be registered the same distance from the top surface, so when the tenon gets inserted, there is alignment, with a good snug fit. Depending on the width (distance from the top boards to the end of the BB), the BB can be a crucial factor on how it will hold up, like if leaned on.

Functionally, the center of the top stock can be fastened to the BB, as the purpose would allow the boards to move laterally. There are other ways to do BB's if done properly.





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