Box Joint Question - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Steve Neul
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 04-23-2018, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northridge, CA
Posts: 40
View sailmike's Photo Album My Photos
Box Joint Question

This was my first attempt at a box joint. I think the set/spacing pin was a bit too loose, but the joints came out ok for my purposes. I'm looking for advice on the best ways to trim the joint flush. For the other corners I used a flush trim router bit, but can't use that here. The faces are glued to the fronts of the drawers.

Thanks,
Mike
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Box Joint Question.jpg
Views:	121
Size:	224.7 KB
ID:	357793  

sailmike is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 04-23-2018, 11:05 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 834
View Terry Q's Photo Album My Photos
You’ll probably have to use a sharp chisel


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
Terry Q is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 06:04 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,474
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
If I had a Japanese pull style saw I would try that.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 07:15 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,077
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
As far as cleaning up the overhang you have now you might put a broad knife up against the drawer front to shield it and sand the sides with an orbital sander.

The dado's were too deep in both directions. To really have any strength the parts have to fit together perfect. In order to get it set up right you have to make a mock up with scrap wood before machining you parts.

I think I would have assembled the box first before attaching the front. That way you could putty and sand the sides of the box before final assembly. Often when you are making a cross cut dado like that there will be a little chipping and needs a little putty.
woodnthings likes this.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 07:53 AM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,197
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
Clean them up with a chisel and sanding. It looks like a drawer for shop use so I would just do the best I could. You learned from this so next time it will be better.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 08:17 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,623
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
sanding first

In order to glue on the front, you have had to sand the ends of first? Why didn't you sand them off on the sides at the same time? You said you used a flush trim bit which was probably OK.

Now you have 3 choices, as suggested, a chisel working small amounts away at at time, A japanese pull saw holding it down flush to the sides, or a ROS using a sheild to stay off the back of the front....

OR chisel or saw, then sander.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-24-2018 at 08:19 AM.
woodnthings is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 08:42 AM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,197
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
In order to glue on the front, you have had to sand the ends of first? Why didn't you sand them off on the sides at the same time? You said you used a flush trim bit which was probably OK.

Now you have 3 choices, as suggested, a chisel working small amounts away at at time, A japanese pull saw holding it down flush to the sides, or a ROS using a sheild to stay off the back of the front....

OR chisel or saw, then sander.
Sometimes people focus on one thing and miss something else. It's part of learning.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 10:13 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
For spots like this I can sometimes start with a rasp, go to a file and finish with sandpaper wrapped around a block.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 12:21 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,995
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
if you have a dado blade, you can place the front against the fence, and place a spacer block to elevate the drawer level, then cut off the nubs.
TimPa is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 02:35 PM
Senior Member
 
Maylar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South Central Connecticut
Posts: 1,151
View Maylar's Photo Album My Photos
I'd use a flush cut trim saw...

http://www.rockler.com/flush-cutting-trim-saw

Dave in CT, USA
Maylar is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northridge, CA
Posts: 40
View sailmike's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the tips everyone! I like the flush cut saw idea, but the wood I have to trim is too low for it to be effective. I'm not sure the chisel I have is sharp enough, so the rasp may be best. I glued the facing before assembling because I wanted to drill out the holes for the handles. Maybe next time I'll screw the facing to the front rather than gluing it.
sailmike is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 08:09 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailmike View Post
Thanks for the tips everyone! I like the flush cut saw idea, but the wood I have to trim is too low for it to be effective. I'm not sure the chisel I have is sharp enough, so the rasp may be best. I glued the facing before assembling because I wanted to drill out the holes for the handles. Maybe next time I'll screw the facing to the front rather than gluing it.
As you know, most rasps are considered rough cut. Even the smooth side of a rasp is usually rougher than a file. Files vary from a medium cut to a fine cut. Same with sandpaper. 80 grit usually cuts pretty fast. Good luck.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 08:13 PM
Senior Member
 
mmwood_1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: corvallis, Oregon
Posts: 1,271
View mmwood_1's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailmike View Post
I'm not sure the chisel I have is sharp enough, so the rasp may be best. .
Whenever someone decides to get into woodworking and asks me about chisels, I tell them that the brand of chisel is not as important as knowing how to sharpen it. I'd suggest getting yourself a real sharpening stone and practise getting that chisel sharp. A sharp chisel comes in handy in the shop a whole lot more frequently than a dull one does. Good luck!
mmwood_1 is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 04-24-2018, 08:17 PM
Senior Member
 
Kerrys's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: NW Washington State
Posts: 814
View Kerrys's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailmike View Post
I'm not sure the chisel I have is sharp enough,
Might be a good time to learn how to sharpen chisels. Good project to test your new sharpening skills on. Knowing how to sharpen your tools is a valuable skill.
Kerrys is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 04-25-2018, 05:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 239
View TwoRails's Photo Album My Photos
I’ve never done it, but to go with TimPa’s suggestion, here’s YouTube video by William Ng showing just how to do it. He has another video on how he made the table saw jig he used. …one day I’ll make one, LOL…

I feel the whole video is work watching, but the link should start when he first talks about this kind of cut. He first talks about solid wood edge banding and the he demos cutting off plywood box finger joints flush:

Multi Function Table Saw Jig: Flush trim and Cut small pieces Safely
https://youtu.be/AddH8IgL7wY?t=7m22s
TwoRails is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 04-27-2018, 05:34 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northridge, CA
Posts: 40
View sailmike's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerrys View Post
Might be a good time to learn how to sharpen chisels. Good project to test your new sharpening skills on. Knowing how to sharpen your tools is a valuable skill.
Yes I should learn how to do that. I'm only an occasional woodworker though.

Turns out all I needed was very coarse sandpaper on my power sander.

Thanks everyone!
sailmike is offline  
Reply

Tags
box joint, trimming

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oak table with table leg wedge joint and brass details Christian S General Woodworking Discussion 13 07-09-2017 03:58 PM
Finger Joint Question. Monty024 Joinery 3 06-14-2017 02:31 PM
Question on breadboard end joint nick_m General Woodworking Discussion 4 06-03-2017 01:24 AM
Book matched miter joint question rinn69 Joinery 9 03-08-2016 07:51 AM
What is this simple joint called, and is it any good? ugcheleuce Joinery 8 03-04-2016 07:43 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome