Bow on boards from Jointer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 04-08-2015, 10:32 AM Thread Starter
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Bow on boards from Jointer

So finally have the jointer I bought on Craigslist (Delta 37-190) cleaned up and even put a Shelix head in it. I've noticed that setting the outfeed table is aggravating to say the least... When I use the dial to calibrate it to the cutter, rotating the cutter until it just BARELY nicks the straight-edge, that goes to hell the second I tighten the lock... This seems to throw it out of whack and raise the table for some reason.
So then if I go to joint a board it'll bump into the outfeed table edge because it's too high...

If I get it to what seems to be perfectly aligned (after much trial and error), the resulting edge refuses to be perfectly straight. On a board about 18" long there will be a tiny gap in the middle. Probably less than a 1/32" (just enough to let some light through when I hold the edge of a 16" combo square to it). Maybe this isn't a huge deal for glue-up, but I'm a bit of a perfectionist...

The one thing I HAVE noticed though... Is if the outfeed table is ever slightly too low, IE, I have a tiny bit of snipe, the resulting edge seems to be straighter, IE, no bow in the middle. From what I can tell the tables seem to be perfectly parallel... Ideas? Is it ok to just live with an inch of snipe that I can cut off if it results in a straight edge?
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post #2 of 9 Old 04-08-2015, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Sgt BOMBULOUS View Post
So finally have the jointer I bought on Craigslist (Delta 37-190) cleaned up and even put a Shelix head in it. I've noticed that setting the outfeed table is aggravating to say the least... When I use the dial to calibrate it to the cutter, rotating the cutter until it just BARELY nicks the straight-edge, that goes to hell the second I tighten the lock... This seems to throw it out of whack and raise the table for some reason.
So then if I go to joint a board it'll bump into the outfeed table edge because it's too high...

If I get it to what seems to be perfectly aligned (after much trial and error), the resulting edge refuses to be perfectly straight. On a board about 18" long there will be a tiny gap in the middle. Probably less than a 1/32" (just enough to let some light through when I hold the edge of a 16" combo square to it). Maybe this isn't a huge deal for glue-up, but I'm a bit of a perfectionist...

The one thing I HAVE noticed though... Is if the outfeed table is ever slightly too low, IE, I have a tiny bit of snipe, the resulting edge seems to be straighter, IE, no bow in the middle. From what I can tell the tables seem to be perfectly parallel... Ideas? Is it ok to just live with an inch of snipe that I can cut off if it results in a straight edge?
I can't help with the mechanics of your jointer any more than what you've done, but yes, in my opinion it's OK to be a bit of a perfectionist when glue ups are involved.

With the gap you describe or any gap for that matter, when those big ole powerful pipe clamps force the wood to squeeze glue out along the gap area they have already screwed up the glue joint near the ends. Likewise if the ends have a gap the same scenario happens in the middle. End result is a starved glue joint which may not be obvious for a couple of years but usually at some point rears its ugly head.
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post #3 of 9 Old 04-08-2015, 01:32 PM Thread Starter
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I saw it said in another thread about jointers that a very small gap is ok. Not sure where to draw the line though... I'll tinker with it some more tonight and see what I can figure out.
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post #4 of 9 Old 04-08-2015, 02:34 PM
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I saw it said in another thread about jointers that a very small gap is ok. Not sure where to draw the line though... I'll tinker with it some more tonight and see what I can figure out.
The gap question comes comes up occasionally and many years ago I read that it was desirable to cause a "spring joint". Maybe to some it's desirable but just not for me as I can't see any advantage.
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post #5 of 9 Old 04-08-2015, 02:49 PM
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I saw it said in another thread about jointers that a very small gap is ok. Not sure where to draw the line though... I'll tinker with it some more tonight and see what I can figure out.
A very minor gap, the thickness of the shaving from a bench or smoothing plane, can be helpful in creating what's called a sprung joint. However, were talking 1/64 or less. 1/32 is a little much. I'd wager that if you're getting better results with the outfeed dropped a little low, I'd drop it

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post #6 of 9 Old 04-08-2015, 05:10 PM
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From what I'm reading here I would think the infeed and outfeed tables are not dead on parallel to each other, and if the adjustment moves that much on tightening the bed the outfeed is on is not square or the outfeed tabe has a warp somewhere. Could be as simple as a bit of rust in the wrong place. I once had an old Delta jointer that had the lead edge of the outfeed worn down and cupped. That made adjusting very problematic.
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post #7 of 9 Old 04-08-2015, 11:21 PM Thread Starter
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The tables don't appear to be perfectly parallel, but adjusting the outfeed table very carefully did result in some dead-on edges after only a few light passes. Worst case maybe I'll have to shim the outfeed table a bit?
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post #8 of 9 Old 04-09-2015, 12:18 AM
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Sounds like the tables aren't coplanar. Sounds like the ends are higher then the middle, at least on either the in or outfeed. Are they adjustable?

Took me about 6 tries before I got mine perfect. Over 3 years that is.

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post #9 of 9 Old 04-20-2015, 08:00 AM
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It appears to me as well that you need to better tune your jointer.

I'd like to recommend a book that really does a great job of describing in detail how to do this, as well as other equipment in your shop. http://www.amazon.com/Care-Repair-Sh...repair+of+shop .This book is authored by John White & I can't emphasise enough how good this book really is.

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