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post #1 of 11 Old 01-12-2019, 03:55 PM Thread Starter
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boat seats

Hello all, first post here. Been looking at a variety of sites and thought this one would a great place to potentially get some help with my project.


I have a 1956 boat that needs the seats replaced which were originally nomina1l 1 x 12 clear redwood. I wanted to stay close to original look instead of using oak, pine or readily available cedar. I ran across some rough cut cedar measuring 6 x 6 with a really tight grain (maybe 1/16" between grains). The grain runs as shown in the first drawing. If I cut as shown in the second drawing I can get 2 pieces which when joined will get me the necessary width. The seats are a max of 48" long and will be supported only at the ends. The seats rest on but are not attached to flotation tanks. My questions are:
1. Would this method of cutting out the seats with the resultant grain orientation be the best option? Bear in mind that my thoughts are to join the two pieces of wood together.
2. Assuming that 1 is okay, what is the best method to splice the two pieces together? I'd like to stay around 3/4" thick but could take it up to 1" if that would help significantly with options.



Thanks
Kirk
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-12-2019, 06:52 PM
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Here is a great article on the best way to cut a board. It looks like rift sawn would be the most dimensionally stable way to cut up that 6x6.

What kind of tool were you going to use to cut it down the middle?

http://www.v3-usa.com/learn/comparin...sawn-flooring/

I use gorilla glue to join boards together. It doesnt dry right away and is a very strong bond. It also expands and foams up which fills in any cracks or voids in the wood.
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-12-2019, 08:11 PM Thread Starter
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Broseph, I appreciate your reply as well as the link. My thought was to build a jig of sorts that would support the wood as shown in this picture. Don't worry, I won't be tackling this by myself. I have a friend who has all the necessary equipment to get this done.My original thinking would have resulted in plain sawn boards. Rotating the wood will allow me to get boards closely approximating rift sawn boards. I figure I'll only be able to get two boards if I want to get the 11.5" finished width.


If I understand correctly, you are a advocate of just gluing the joints? I've read that a properly glued joint can be stronger than the adjacent wood.



Kirk
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-12-2019, 08:42 PM
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Nice, I was curious because I would love to be able to make my own rift sawn boards. Seems like you would need a band saw mill.

Ive done about 30 or so panels with just glue and I have never seen one break at the glue joint. I have had boards break apart from a crack or the pith but never at the glue joint. I make wood signs and they are usually 24x24" consisting of multiple boards. Nevery use any kind of joinery on them.
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post #5 of 11 Old 01-13-2019, 10:23 AM
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Kirk - I too would love to see photos of the boat !!!
especially the existing seats and where they go.
what part of the country are you in ?

.

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
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post #6 of 11 Old 01-13-2019, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
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Morning John. I live in western Iowa where it's a balmy 27 deg with a fresh 8" snowfall. May be a while before I get into the boat. Here's a link to a page showing what boat I have. They don't have a plan view of my model but if you look at the lower plan view, it's similar to this but with a shorter front deck and a bow seat. If the weather warms up (was in the 50s last week) I may get it uncovered and I'll post some pics.
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-13-2019, 11:52 AM Thread Starter
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Not sure what I was thinking but I remembered that I have some pics. One of those hit yourself in the forehead moments. In looking at them I realized that I needed to amend my first post. I noticed that the flotation tanks actually are bolted to the seat at each end. Also noticed that it appears to me that the wood is plain sawn. This would make sense since I can't imagine they would go to the expense of using rift sawn lumber.



Any thoughts you might have on joining the boards would be appreciated.

Kirk
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-13-2019, 12:08 PM Thread Starter
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Now that I got to thinking about how to cut the wood, it brought up a couple questions. I now understand that rift sawn wood is the most dimensionally stable. One big plus would be that you don't have to deal with cupping. Will wood that is about 50 years old cup? Also wondering which cut would give the strongest joint. These seats will be flexing and it would seem to me that plain sawn might give a stronger joint but what do I know. Would dowels or a spline be beneficial?

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post #9 of 11 Old 01-13-2019, 04:57 PM
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Kirk - the seats don't have to be glued together unless
you want a solid board seat. to me, the slat style seats
are more "vintage nautical" looking.
also - how long have you had this boat ??
oak or cedar is not original to your boat. the original seats for the
Crestliner and other aluminum boats in the '50s were 3/4" mahogany
marine plywood - not lumber boards. so like many boats of
that era, many things got replaced as they wear out.
transom panels, seats and dashboards are commonly replaced.

here are some photos of my 1959 CRESTLINER . . .
the original bench seats disappeared decades ago as my
two younger brothers and I took turns of possession of it.
my father bought it new in 1959 so it is a family heirloom.
I closed off part of the bow under the deck and filled it with
foam to make it airtight to compensate for the air tanks that
were removed from under the bench seats.
have you visited the site for aluminum boats ? www.tinboats.net
as well as www.retrocrestliner.com
the original bow handle and two stern transom handles
are available if you don't have the originals.
looking forward to following your project.

when it comes to making wood items for a boat,
there are certain regimens that you must follow
in order to achieve satisfactory results.
I have written several articles on how to make wooden
boat seats and transoms that will last for many years.
people that make kitchen cabinets and dining room furniture
should not give advice on projects that will go in an open boat.

I am in the process of making all new seats and floor boards
for my boat out of Bald Cypress that will be clear varnished
and not painted. the whole boat is getting a much needed
renovation. the back bench seat will be 4 slats - not one board.
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there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.

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post #10 of 11 Old 01-13-2019, 06:27 PM
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John, you are dead on about the seats for this boat best being slats. My 1976 Bayliner Admiralty had a lot of wood and I learned a lot working on that boat.



In a later boat I found out about Iroco. It is a good substitute for Teak.




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post #11 of 11 Old 01-13-2019, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
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Once again, thanks to everyone for their input.


John, yes I'm over on Retro Crestliner probably 4 years or so (since I got my boat). how about you? Only been on tinboats a couple times.


The topic on original wood for seats gets batted around quite a bit. Don't believe I've heard that the original wood might have been ply. I believe that it's in the 1955 Crestliner brochure where they state seats are redwood. I believe they also talk about this in another brochure but could be mistaken.


I was leaning toward a solid board just to try and make it more original. Granted cedar isn't original but I thought it would be closer to redwood as opposed to mahogany or oak that some have been using. I have a generic bow handle from that era and do have the transom handles.



That's a nice looking boat you have there. It means a lot being able to keep a family heirloom. If possibly, I'd be interested in getting a copy of your articles. If you take a look at my transom, the PO did a really lousy job. I plan on replacing it with a white oak/plywood combination.

My apologies to all of you that aren't boat people.


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