best way to attach tabletop to center base - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 11-23-2018, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
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best way to attach tabletop to center base

I hope this is the correct forum. I have an antique table where the top has become separated from the base. It attaches using a single point in the center, where the top of the base has a round 1" extension about the diameter of a broom-handle, that slips into a similar sized 'hole' in the top. This joint is no longer tight, and simply wood gluing it will not make for a good lasting connection. Is there a circular bracket or some other method that would make for a solid, permanent attachment?
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post #2 of 12 Old 11-23-2018, 07:11 PM Thread Starter
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Just a photo to show the base and top.
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post #3 of 12 Old 11-23-2018, 07:53 PM
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Assuming this is not a "valuable" antique, I'd probably make a ring of matching wood species with a center diameter the size of base top and the same thickness of the straight section at the top. You can make the outer diameter as large as you want and maybe even rout a shape to it to disguise part. Now you have a much larger gluing area to affix the base to the top. I'd glue the base and top with a good gap filling glue and then peg the cured join with wooden pins glued into drilled holes fixing the new part, the base, and the top all together.

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post #4 of 12 Old 11-23-2018, 10:26 PM
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I assume that the original table was strong and stable before the glue let loose, right?

If so, then you might consider using epoxy to glue the post (tenon) to the top. The epoxy would fill the gaps and give good structural strength.

@Jim Frye's suggestion is a good one, because it would give the tabletop much better support, but it would take more effort, and might be tricky to get it right.

Whatever you do, take the time to clean off the old, dried glue first.
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post #5 of 12 Old 11-23-2018, 11:08 PM Thread Starter
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Cool. I like the idea of epoxy over wood glue. And unfortunately I am not at my Casa so I do not have the proper tools to do a proper Peg hole solution. That would probably make the whole thing far more stable. So as such I am a bit limited in my options.
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post #6 of 12 Old 11-24-2018, 03:53 PM
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Is there enough thickness left in the table top where the post hole is to accept a hanger bolt? If not, then how about filling all or some of the hole with epoxy and cutting off the post as needed, then use a hanger bolt to supplement regluing the base to the top? Wouldn't need a lot of tools, epoxy/glue, small saw, drill, drill bits, and hanger bolt.

Last edited by JIMMIEM; 11-24-2018 at 03:55 PM. Reason: add info
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post #7 of 12 Old 11-24-2018, 04:45 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah, that would do it and would be pretty easy, except I cannot find a simple drill here. in fact it was a miracle I found a rusty old handsaw! If I can borrow one from a neighbor I will go with this approach. Thanks for the suggestion. Can't tell you how frustrating to be in a house with a thousand 'projects' and no tools!
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post #8 of 12 Old 11-24-2018, 04:51 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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The epoxy would work OK, but ...

Use the epoxy then make a more structural "fix". One idea is to thread a large ID pipe flange onto the OD of the post. Then, screw the flange to the bottom of the table. These things are pricey, but here's the basic idea:
https://www.supplyhouse.com/Ward-FBF...xoCF_MQAvD_BwE


or this;
https://www.amazon.com/GF-Piping-Sys...n%3A3052056011

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-24-2018 at 04:55 PM.
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post #9 of 12 Old 11-25-2018, 10:20 AM
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Once the wood peg and hole are cleaned of glue the hole will be a bit oversized. I would consider cutting a slot in the peg (with the grain) and inserting a thin wedge so that when you hammer the post home the wedge spreads the peg for a tight fit.

An expanding glue like Gorilla glue might be a good idea too.
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Last edited by Maylar; 11-25-2018 at 10:25 AM.
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post #10 of 12 Old 11-25-2018, 10:36 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Depending on the difference...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maylar View Post
Once the wood peg and hole are cleaned of glue the hole will be a bit oversized. I would consider cutting a slot in the peg (with the grain) and inserting a thin wedge so that when you hammer the post home the wedge spreads the peg for a tight fit.

An expanding glue like Gorilla glue might be a good idea too.
You could also wrap a thin piece of veneer around the tenon to decrease the gap IF the difference is too large to fill with epoxy. This will make the joint as strong as the original, but apparently that was not strong enough. I would add some sort of reinforcement to distribute the forces farther out on the bottom of the table top ... a wood ring could be hole sawn, scroll sawn or jig sawn from a plywood scrap. Leave it better than you found it and it will hold up longer.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 12 Old 11-25-2018, 12:51 PM
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The original method obviously worked for many years before failing so there is no need to reinvent the wheel.

This is a very informative page on how to repair furniture joints:

http://antiquerestorers.com/Articles...ure_joints.htm

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #12 of 12 Old 11-25-2018, 01:20 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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maybe, maybe not

Since it has failed, it is no longer the original in strength. "Reinventing the wheel" is a sarcastic phrase at best. Since we are making a repair why not use a reinforcement to insure the best possible outcome? It's obvious to me that the tenon is way too small to offer much strength. If this repair came to my shop, I would spend a few more minutes making the best repair I could at the time. Here's an example of "repairs" I made on an antique dresser:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/a...-repair-11477/

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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