Best way to attach/join breadboards?? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 06:09 PM Thread Starter
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Best way to attach/join breadboards??

I know there are a handful of ways to attach a breadboard to a glued-up table top, some even use pocket screws underneath and I am just wondering as a noob, what the best way to attach breadboards is that will ensure no cracks and stability. Thanks!

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post #2 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 06:33 PM
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Slot the entry holes in the bottom of the bread board and attach to tabletop with a panhead screw and washer. This way the screw can move laterally as the wood top expands and contracts.
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post #3 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 07:12 PM Thread Starter
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Slot the entry holes in the bottom of the bread board and attach to tabletop with a panhead screw and washer. This way the screw can move laterally as the wood top expands and contracts.
Ok, so by this you mean the screws going from the outside of the breadboard (end of table outside) into the apron? Screw it in like a lag or a nut and washer with a bolt? Thanks!
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post #4 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 08:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlenosebob View Post

Ok, so by this you mean the screws going from the outside of the breadboard (end of table outside) into the apron? Screw it in like a lag or a nut and washer with a bolt? Thanks!
From the bottom of the bread board up into the planks of the table top. This way they aren't seen unless you get up under the table.
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post #5 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 08:21 PM
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This is a great tutorial by Firemedic on breadboard joinery. He uses all hand tools but the principles are exactly the same regardless of the tools you are using. http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/b...d-tools-32653/

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
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post #6 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 09:18 PM Thread Starter
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Ok thansk but I don't have all them fancy to do tools available. Does this work or would you not recommend it?

http://image.ana-white.com/sites/def...plans%2011.png

I think 2 big size bolts with nuts and washers would keep the breadboards held in place pretty tight. Thoughts?
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post #7 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 09:56 PM
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What is shown in the picture does not function as a traditional breadboard. What is shown is just bolting on a board on the end that looks like one.

Breadboard ends are put together with a long mortise and tenon and serve the function of preventing cupping. To allow for expansion/contraction, all methods of attachment need slotted holes in the tenon, except the center which should be permanently attached.

Lots of different ways to cut the mortise and tenon, everything from hand tools to many different combinations of power tools.

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post #8 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 10:17 PM Thread Starter
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Ok that helps, so theoretically, I could drill out holes in both the breadboard and the apron and use rounded wood dowels to attach it, would that be helpful... or work well?
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post #9 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 10:36 PM
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Just to make sure we are both understanding each other, here is a diagram I found on Google from Wood Magazine showing a diagram of a "typical" breadboard end:



The tongue or tenon can be formed using a router and a straight edge clamped to the table top. Mortise can also be made with a router.

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post #10 of 14 Old 04-18-2014, 10:49 PM
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I use 5/16 or 3/8 dowels either from the bottom as mentioned or from the top as a decorative element.
The holes are drilled with the breadboard held tightly to the table with clamps.
A thirty inch wide table needs about a 1/2 an inch or so of movement so the lateral holes are widened by a quarter inch on each side of the pilot hole. Take care to consider if the wood is in a state that it will expand or contract from the width you start with.
It is a bit debatable but you can determine which part you want to be the widest in the higher humidity summer. It may look better to have them flush in summer and the table narrower ( more narrow?) in the dry winter. I try to avoid having the table wider than the breadboard at any time of the year.
A stopped mortice in the breadboard looks the best. You can make the mortice easily by bandsawing of the top and bottom, removing the mortice wood and gluing it back together. The glue lines barely show is flat sawn boards.
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post #11 of 14 Old 04-19-2014, 02:50 AM Thread Starter
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how bout this? is this a good method? http://cdn1.thewoodwhisperer.com/wp-...breadboard.jpg
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post #12 of 14 Old 05-12-2014, 06:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trc65 View Post
Just to make sure we are both understanding each other, here is a diagram I found on Google from Wood Magazine showing a diagram of a "typical" breadboard end:



The tongue or tenon can be formed using a router and a straight edge clamped to the table top. Mortise can also be made with a router.


I'm interested in doing a joint like this for a plank table using boards that are 2 3/8" thick and 7 1/4" wide. What router bit would you recommend? I'm new to wood working and my router is being shipped as we speak. I appreciate any help I can get!
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post #13 of 14 Old 05-13-2014, 08:37 PM
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Kyle, I use mostly hand tools, but if I was going to use a router for the tenon I'd probably use a large straight bit taking small bites. A straight bit would work for the mortise, but it tends to clog up easily. I think a spiral bit might work better.

As I said though, I'm not really an experienced power tool user, so if no one else chimes in here with recommendations, pose your question in the Power Tool sub-forum and you'll get lots of great info.

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post #14 of 14 Old 05-14-2014, 01:18 AM
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Thanks Tim!
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