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post #1 of 10 Old 04-19-2014, 10:50 PM Thread Starter
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Best joint to use

I am looking for a recommendation on what joint to use. I am looking at joining three boards, ends together in a 'T' formation.

What would be the strongest joint to use? No screws, nails, brads, staples.

This is for stringers between table legs, rectangle table that has six legs. I am mortise and tenon the legs and stringers but the middle legs will have a mortise and tenon as well as a through m&t.

I am not sure what forces will end up acting on the joint as the table will be stationary, but I want to make it as strong as possible.

Thank you for what help/suggestions are offered.
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post #2 of 10 Old 04-20-2014, 11:28 PM
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A lot would depend on the thickness of the material you are using. If 3/4" I would probably use a half lap joint. If you are using wood 1 1/2" thick or more I think a through mortise joint would be better.
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post #3 of 10 Old 04-21-2014, 10:47 AM
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Joining THREE boards that way? What's the orientation? Is it an upright capital T, with two boards joining supported by the third at the joint, or is it a T lying down? Basically, what's the orientation of the stress on the joint?

Also, how big are the boards?
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post #4 of 10 Old 04-21-2014, 10:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amckenzie4 View Post
Joining THREE boards that way? What's the orientation? Is it an upright capital T, with two boards joining supported by the third at the joint, or is it a T lying down? Basically, what's the orientation of the stress on the joint?

Also, how big are the boards?
+1. Definitely needs clarification as to the layout.






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post #5 of 10 Old 04-21-2014, 08:51 PM
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1/3 lap joint?

If the top cross piece of the "T" is up under the table top and the leg of the"T" points down, consider this.

If the pieces are all 3/4" thick: On the two upper cross pieces cut a lap joint 1/4" thick from the outside edge on one piece and the inside edge of the other. The leg piece gets a tenon 1/4" thick in the center to fit in between the two cross pieces.

If all the pieces are 2" x 4"'s, the tenons/ tongues would be 1/2" thick.

Maybe someone with Sketch up can sketch this up for the OP.

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post #6 of 10 Old 04-21-2014, 11:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baldfatguy View Post
I am looking for a recommendation on what joint to use. I am looking at joining three boards, ends together in a 'T' formation.

What would be the strongest joint to use? No screws, nails, brads, staples.

This is for stringers between table legs, rectangle table that has six legs. I am mortise and tenon the legs and stringers but the middle legs will have a mortise and tenon as well as a through m&t.

I am not sure what forces will end up acting on the joint as the table will be stationary, but I want to make it as strong as possible.

Thank you for what help/suggestions are offered.
It will help if you post a photo or two of the style of table you intend to make
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post #7 of 10 Old 04-22-2014, 09:11 AM Thread Starter
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Sorry I thought the description was clear, no problem.

The material that I am using for this part of the project is 2X6 oriented as if they are a normal floor joist, so the length of the boards is horizontal with the width of the boards vertical. The three meet at a single junction, each of these boards are tenon down to one inch.

A way to help visualize the junction each "leg" of an uppercase T is a separate board. This whole joint is then being incased in another piece of wood that is perpendicular to the other three.

The three 2X6 are in the XY plane with the fourth is in the Z plane. The three 2X6 XY are tenon and the Z is mortise with one being through and the other going part way but connected to the through mortise.

The overall project is for a work bench, I would show pictures but I am embarrassed with my wood work skills. When I am done I will post pictures that are taken from great distance away so that minimal detail can be seen.

Thank you for the help.
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post #8 of 10 Old 04-22-2014, 09:13 AM
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typical stretcher joinery is mortise and tenon.
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post #9 of 10 Old 04-22-2014, 09:34 AM
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post #10 of 10 Old 04-22-2014, 11:06 AM
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Orienting the members for the joint the three 2x6's in the XY plane and the fourth in the Z plane, would be a potential layout. The three XY's would be the tenon members, and the Z member is mortised with one being through and the other going part way, but joined to the through mortise.

I may have made this sound confusing, so, if you could do a drawing and post it to show the exact layout would be more helpful with this rendition.





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