Best joinery method for toy chest? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 01-05-2014, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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Question Best joinery method for toy chest?

I have basic wood work ability. Just got a router and am hoping to use for the joinery of a toy box / bench I want to build. What is the best method for joining to form the box? The types I am considering: butt biscuit joints, edge mitre joint with spline, lock mitre joint, or rabbit joint ? Looking for simplicity with enough strength for a decent sized toy chest... Thanks so much! Just not sure..rabbit joint looks easiest but wasn't sure if that was appropriate for a large toy chest. What you think?
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post #2 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 02:40 PM Thread Starter
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No one with any idea?
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post #3 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 02:49 PM
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Box/finger joints are very strong.

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post #4 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 03:18 PM
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I'm just a novice but I use rabbit joints for my boxes. Then use #8 screws also. Look up rabbit/dado joints, I think they might be "better".

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post #5 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 03:34 PM
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A locking rabbet joint is another option, but it will leave some end grain exposed.

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post #6 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 05:40 PM
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I've always used box joints. Strong, with lots of glue surface.

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post #7 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 06:04 PM
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I like dovetails myself but if I was limited on the joints you mention I would use 45's and splines to join them. With enough splines you should have a chest to withstand the abuse of children.

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post #8 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 10:42 PM
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Add one to the votes for box joints. That is what I used on the toy/blanket chest I just built for my granddaughter. Mitered corners with sufficient splined could be pretty strong too, but would be harder to produce, in my opinion. You can make a box joint jig for use on either a router table or table saw fairly easily.
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post #9 of 14 Old 01-08-2014, 11:44 PM
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What sorts of loads do you expect those box joints to take?
Do you plan to let your kids kick the crapola out of the box and everything else?
I doubt that.

Of course, you can make them elegant and durable enough for a trip past Jupiter and back.

Look. Before you know it, you sit in the audience and watch your (little) D1 get her PhD in Experimental Human Medicine (Nov.26.13). We all survived. Even the flat-faced glue & screw joints in the toy box.
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post #10 of 14 Old 01-09-2014, 06:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpeluso8 View Post
I have basic wood work ability. Just got a router and am hoping to use for the joinery of a toy box / bench I want to build. What is the best method for joining to form the box? The types I am considering: butt biscuit joints, edge mitre joint with spline, lock mitre joint, or rabbit joint ? Looking for simplicity with enough strength for a decent sized toy chest... Thanks so much! Just not sure..rabbit joint looks easiest but wasn't sure if that was appropriate for a large toy chest. What you think?
IMO the joinery would depend on what is used for materials. Will the corners be plywood (type) or solid wood (species)?





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post #11 of 14 Old 01-09-2014, 10:15 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
IMO the joinery would depend on what is used for materials. Will the corners be plywood (type) or solid wood (species)?





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This is something I want to paint some child colors..it will be for a newborn. SO I was thinking maybe some kind of plywood? MDF possibly? In other words, it doesn't have to be some expensive hardwood..
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post #12 of 14 Old 01-09-2014, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpeluso8 View Post
This is something I want to paint some child colors..it will be for a newborn. SO I was thinking maybe some kind of plywood? MDF possibly? In other words, it doesn't have to be some expensive hardwood..
If you are painting, you could use simple rabbets, glue and fasteners. Fill holes...and paint. I would go with a paintable plywood, like Maple. MDF may or may not hold up over time. If you decide to use MDF, you could edge glue solid wood on the edges to be joined. I've had that work out well on many occasions. Works for plywood too. Makes for a good joint and a more durable exterior corner.






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post #13 of 14 Old 01-13-2014, 11:20 PM
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If you're a nivice and want a simple and quick method, then pocket screws come to mind. They are becoming more increasingly popular. MDF is not good for joinery. It has little joint strength, and its heavy. Go wood all the way.
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post #14 of 14 Old 01-20-2014, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman
If you are painting, you could use simple rabbets, glue and fasteners. Fill holes...and paint. I would go with a paintable plywood, like Maple. MDF may or may not hold up over time. If you decide to use MDF, you could edge glue solid wood on the edges to be joined. I've had that work out well on many occasions. Works for plywood too. Makes for a good joint and a more durable exterior corner. .
Do you suggest 3/4 inch maple or is 1/2 inch fine? I also want to use the wood to make a bench style top with armrests and want to be sure the 1/2 inch is thick enough for using the router to make rounded edges for those armrests
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