Approach to dissassemble/re-glue loose chairs? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 31 Old 09-12-2011, 11:27 AM
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In a pinch, I have used black electrical tape, just don't leave it on for years.

Harrison, at your service!
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post #22 of 31 Old 09-12-2011, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by josie1952 View Post
I am also in the process of cleaning up old dining room chairs and appreciate all the advice for gluing them. I almost used Gorilla Glue and am glad I did not. It does expand alot. Also for the wood planing/advice. My mom used to use toothpicks. However, I am more perplexed about how to get a good "clamp" in such awkward places. Can anyone help me with this? I want as tight a joint as possible since I have some squirmy kids.
Hi Josie - Gorilla glue is a good choice as it does expand and fill any gaps created by cleaning the old glue off. The example posted previously about the stuff expanding out so much is a great example of over gluing.
For clamping, I found ratchet straps do a good job on odd size/shaped pieces. Sometimes takes some head scratching to figure out how to wrap the thing though

John

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post #23 of 31 Old 09-21-2011, 08:06 PM
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Round joints will eventually work loose again if they do not have a taper. The early chair makers used hide glue so the joints could be periodically taken apart and reassembled.
Using epoxy, urethane or other insoluble glue may make this fix easier but will make the next fix very difficult so be sure you have considered this. You can still get hide or fish glues and add a bit of dust if you want to gap fill.
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post #24 of 31 Old 09-22-2011, 07:56 PM
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Thanks again for everyone's advice. With four chairs (and two arm chairs to go), I tried a little of everything. Most of my joints were tight and some had no apparent glue. I tried wrapping a bit of cheesecloth with the Titebond on the ones that were loose. And I tried using Gorilla Clue in some of the deeper grooves in the chair. I tried looking for hide glue but found none is there a brand name? I used a combination of clamps, and made "strap" braces from strips of tightly woven cloth and screw drivers, etc. So far, so good.. I loved reading all the posts - you have been generous with your comments and helped me alot.
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post #25 of 31 Old 09-23-2011, 06:52 PM
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Lee Valley has product called High tach Fish glue which is a more usable form of hide glue as no hot pot is needed.
They do also have hide glue but it is a bigger commitment.
Have fun.
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post #26 of 31 Old 09-23-2011, 07:37 PM
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Hot hide glue works best on good fitting joints, not ones that were previously glued with another glue or if there are inherent gaps on the fitted parts.








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post #27 of 31 Old 01-14-2012, 09:51 PM
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Back in the 1970's while traveling around the country, we ran into a guy, called, "The Chair Man" He was driving around the Mid West, buying single oak chairs. He bought single chairs, because they were cheaper than sets.
He would knock them apart with a mallot, and pile the parts in his truck.
When he got back to his shop, with a truckload, he would sort the parts, refinish and assemble chair sets, and sell them.
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post #28 of 31 Old 01-15-2012, 06:18 PM
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I am currently in a similar situation and trying to repair a rocking chair for my mother. I have it completely disassembled and am wondering if I should re-glue with WonderLok 'Em (as Ed and the guy at the Rockler store has suggested) or should I be using Titebond III? I want this to be the last time I have to do this and need to make sure it will hold up to the wear and tear it gets every day.

Bill
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post #29 of 31 Old 01-16-2012, 01:31 PM
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Pirate - Thanks for the laugh. I possibly have some of those chairs...in pieces again.
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post #30 of 31 Old 01-17-2012, 12:17 PM
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Sorry that my last reply was unclear.
A Round wood tenon in a hole glued perpendicular to the grain is doomed to work loose if it undergoes seasonal moisture change like in most of our homes. Like a wooden hammer handle in a steel hammer head.
If the fit is tight when the wood is dry, it WILL expand a bit when the humidity is up for long. If the tenon swells much (such as when the tangential grain is oriented in the long axis of the grain around the hole) there can be enough expansion in the non expandable space to cause compression crushing of the tenon.
Now when the tenon be it a chair rung or a axe head dries, the crushed fibres will not elastically expand to keep the hole full and the joint will be loose. It may need to be taken apart and reassembled.
If an insoluble glue was used , the joint cleanup is much more difficult.
Therefore, epoxy, TB II or III or urethane are less desirable.
A hide or fish glue that can be softened with water is more easy to repair.
You can Try to prevent this with tapered or wedged tenons or with blind or open wedges.
Orienting any dowel / tenon so the long grain direction of the hole lines up with the radial direction of the tenon will help.
Overly loose joints can be "filled" with bits of wood such as veneer or just some sawdust in the glue to better gap fill.
It probably will come loose again in a few years or moisture cycles! You don't want to be the one responsible for the horrible cleanup whether it's you or the next repairer.
There is at least one product thar tries to re-expand the crushed fibres to tighten the joints.
I hope I expressed that "more better" .
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post #31 of 31 Old 01-17-2012, 04:58 PM
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Thanks Midlandbob that is the information I was looking for.

Bill
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