Angled Mitered table legs - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 02:28 AM Thread Starter
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Angled Mitered table legs

Hi,

First post.. I would like to build an outdoor dining table based on the attached picture. I am planning to use Western red cedar, and the desired dimensions are 8' long, 42" wide and 30" high. Based on the picture, I believe my plan is 40% longer...

Questions:
1. How can I make sure the miter joints are strong enough? will splines do the trick or need something else?

2. I really like the design detail that the legs double as breadboard ends, but concerned table length will not hold and I need to add some support. any suggestions / advise?

Thanks in advance!

Gadi
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post #2 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 02:52 AM
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I really like the look of the table and benches but it does look like a poor design structurally.I'm very curious as to what is holding the seat to the mitered legs and stretcher and how the miters are fixed.No center support on the long benches.
I have to admit it has me baffled and I have been building custom furniture for people for many years.
Even with splines or M&T I don't see how it's structurally sound.
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post #3 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 07:22 AM
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it appears the long boards are mortised into the perpendicular end boards (with much room to move being outside).

with the minimal bearing surface for the miter joint shown, with no visible splines etc., it would almost have to be supported with steel inside.

the design may have been intended for small skinny people. a challenging design for sure - Japanese influence?
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post #4 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 08:02 AM
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I think if you used heavy enough stock - like start with 10/4 and finish just north of 2" - the design would work on tables/benches 6' or less. 8' is too long a span for that design, IMO.
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post #5 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 11:45 AM
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Patio Set

Gadi,
This is a beautiful patio set. I've never seen one like this before. It almost has a Danish design.
I can certainly see why you would be concerned about leg strength over the long term. I would make a slight change to assure leg strength by adding a cross-brace to both table legs (inserted 12" below the table top) and the benches (inserted about 7" below the seat).
I know this completely alters the open design and you may not like the idea at all, but it would be structurally stronger and some patio sets are exposed to the weather unless always covered. Even covered, they get more moisture than furniture in the home.
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post #6 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 11:48 AM
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Patio Set

Gadi,
This is a beautiful patio set. I've never seen one like this before. It almost has a Danish design.
I can certainly see why you would be concerned about leg strength over the long term. I would make a slight change to assure leg strength by adding a cross-brace to both table legs (inserted 12" below the table top) and the benches (inserted about 7" below the seat).
I know this completely alters the open design and you may not like the idea at all, but it would be structurally stronger and some patio sets are exposed to the weather unless always covered. Even covered, they get more moisture than furniture in the home.
The furniture in the picture looks like oak. Oak is stronger than cedar and will also effect the strength of your joints in this design.
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post #7 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 01:32 PM Thread Starter
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thanks everyone for the responses.
I might give it a shot with the cross brace, just need to make sure an adult can still sit comfortably with it....
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post #8 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 02:47 PM
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the mitered joints ....

When you add weight, like sitting on the bench, the forces tend to spread the legs open because of the angles, structurally not sound.

IF the only joinery is a miter with glue, no splines, no brackets, no welded metal, I don't see how it will endure.... I am also baffled. It makes no sense to use that joint in that application, BUT it sure looks great.

IF the pieces are metal and finished to look like wood, that's a different story. Just look at the thick support used to hold the backrest board, about 1/2" to me. The whole story is not being told here or is not visible. JMO

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 10 Old 07-02-2015, 10:37 PM
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Looks perdy...But is it functional?

Looks can be deceiving. If metal wasn't incorporated into the legs I would pass.
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post #10 of 10 Old 07-13-2015, 04:28 PM
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I'm not really experienced in woodworking but for a stool I am thinking to make it has the same type of design for the legs. All I found was to make a mitered tenon or to mortise an angled metal bracket into the underside to provide structural support.
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