6" jointer - 12" wide board - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 32 Old 02-15-2013, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bzguy View Post
Planers only surface, not flatten wood.
If you run a bowed piece through a planer it will still be bowed.
The roller in the planer will temporarily hold it straight while it is surfaced.
That being said, there is no guarantee that a piece flattened on a jointer will not bow slightly once wood/tension has been removed from the opposite side with planer.
The poster has never indicated that he has any problem with the wood not being flat nor bowed.

Reads to me that all he is trying to do is get a smooth surface.

G
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post #22 of 32 Old 02-15-2013, 08:42 AM
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face 12" stock, flatten, remove defects, allow to acclimate ....

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Originally Posted by Schramm View Post
Ok I can see that I am an idiot the way I explained that. I am actually looking to face 12" stock. I want to do wider stock then I have a jointer for. I have searched all over youtube and saw a number of videos but I think that I may be better off just buying the 12" Grizzly jointer. Right now I can only do 6" which is nice but for me its not wide enough.
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Yes I do understand about EMC, I have tested a way to handle that to keep the boards from cupping and bowing and that is to joint the face and 1 side, then stack the boards again for 3 days to allow to slowing release moisture and to re-acclimate. On the 4th day is when I plane the wood and then stack it again to go to a buddy of mine that owns a mill near me to kiln dry out the rest of the moisture but to also to raise the temp of the wood to 150-170 degrees for no less then 12 hours which will kill bacteria as well as any bugs.
There is a lot to know to work with re-claimed wood as your initial investment is only the start, its your time that will kill you. I do like the idea of taking them apart then spline them back together however I will have to try it a few times as that may be a little bit more difficult then just buying a 12" jointer as I would have to keep track of the 2 pieces that go back together. I am going to try that this up coming week. Leaving now to go and pick up 1500 board feet of beautiful 12"w x 5/4 barn siding in worn red and no paint grey 150 year old pine. Should make for some nice frames.

Rob
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Originally Posted by Schramm View Post
Planers are just fine for getting your project to final thickness, but in order to take out the defects and truing 1 side you need to flatten 1 side and then 1 edge on a jointer. If the board is warped or has a twist you can cut them down to a board more straight. I do not have my mill in on my property yet as I got it about 1 week ago and I am waiting on my carport to get there before I bring it over. The mill will give me excellent results but even that is far from perfect as the wood has to air dry and then kiln dry prior to getting used. While there are advantages to going to the home center and just buying wood, the number of advantages far outweigh the disadvantages in milling your own wood. I am going to break down and buy Grizzly's 12" jointer with the spiral head, they are a little costly but honestly I will make it up in about 5 molding jobs so it is worth it. I work with a number of builders that do restorations on period homes and make moldings for them and sometimes the easiest way to match a finish is to use wood from that period with the same age.
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Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
The poster has never indicated that he has any problem with the wood not being flat nor bowed.

Reads to me that all he is trying to do is get a smooth surface.

G
What I understand is that there are issues with many or all of the boards, there are too many to rip and reglue, there are defects in some or all, the boards may be warped or not straight, and other issues. A wide jointer is what is needed and is the best solution. He has decided to get the 12" Grizzly with a spiral head, it's a done deal.
I think he was just asking for other processes, or ideas and to further clinch the decision to get the wider jointer. Regardless, he's made his decision. That horse has left the barn.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #23 of 32 Old 02-15-2013, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schramm View Post
Ok I can see that I am an idiot the way I explained that. I am actually looking to face 12" stock. I want to do wider stock then I have a jointer for. I have searched all over youtube and saw a number of videos but I think that I may be better off just buying the 12" Grizzly jointer. Right now I can only do 6" which is nice but for me its not wide enough.
If the boards will physically fit through your planer I would attach them to a 2x12 and shim the hollow spaces under it and run them through the planer to face them.
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post #24 of 32 Old 02-16-2013, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
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I have read a lot about planer sleds, the only issue I have with it is it is even in a sled the rollers still put pressure down on the board and the board does 2 things in a planer that it does not do on a jointer:

1: The down pressure means that the machine is forcing it untrue and skimming it but when the pressure is released from the down pressure and goes back to untrue.

2. If you run a piece through a jointer your pressure while pushing it through is on the outfeed side of the wood, but with a planer the rollers push it down hard on both sides to hold it down and move it.

If you are just shooting for thickness, then a planer is all you need, but if you are wanting to work with rough sawn lumber then there is steps to take that cannot be bypassed. I work with both, but when dealing with barn wood.

Now with all that said, I do work with 1 side flattened wood but in this case I am only shooting for thickness as with barn wood when making a rustic barn frame (shown below). The problem with while I have tricks to adjust for everything, boards that are a little out of square are NOT easy to get a true 45 corners.
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post #25 of 32 Old 02-16-2013, 11:13 PM
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Nice sled

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Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
That should be an awesome jointer. I just remembered that I made a planer sled from some gluing frames, when the board was wider than my 6" jointer. This worked better than I thought, taking lighter cuts to flatten one side.
From a previous post: Planer Sled on Rails
Planer sled
My version came from my "gluing frames" and thinking about a 2 rail system which simply screwed into the edges of the board to be planed.
Heck, I already had a gluing frame, why not try it? The following photos are the results. It worked like a charm!
The reason for a planer sled is your workpiece is too wide for your jointer:
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The rails were a little short for this board as they should have extended 4 or 5 inches beyond the ends, but even so it worked fine. There was a little snipe as a result but it planed out afterwards.

More photos showing the board surfaced one side then removed from the sled and final surfaced. The pile of "chips" was collected by the single stage collector hooked directly to the planer hood.
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This is really a good idea! I remember doing the same theory on a very large timber that I needed to straighten out for a mantle. I ended up screwing sled rails to both sides of the timber to do this. There was a very large twist in it and I needed to keep one corner up almost a full 3/4" and do multiple passes before getting that final true straight edge. Your sled would not have worked in my case for that but I can see its benefits for smaller boards. I will make one next time it comes up.
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post #26 of 32 Old 02-17-2013, 07:19 AM
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A good sled won't allow this

Quote:
I have read a lot about planer sleds, the only issue I have with it is it is even in a sled the rollers still put pressure down on the board and the board does 2 things in a planer that it does not do on a jointer:

1: The down pressure means that the machine is forcing it untrue and skimming it but when the pressure is released from the down pressure and goes back to untrue.


A good sled will not allow the board to move downward when feed rollers apply pressure. Shims or screwing it to the sides/edges will be OK. My simple sled can allow for non-parallel edges, and shims can be inserted under the board and rest on the rabbeted edges. Also a light cut will not significantly distort the whole setup when starting out.

If you have a prized board and don't have access to a wide jointer, then a sled is the easiest and least laborious way to get a flat surface. JMO.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #27 of 32 Old 02-17-2013, 10:46 AM Thread Starter
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WoodnThings,

I totally agree with you, wasnt disagreeing just explaining what I was doing, that would be hard to use on a 9' length piece of material and for me would not work but a great idea just the same.

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post #28 of 32 Old 02-17-2013, 11:18 PM
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Hey Woodnthings that's an awesome sled! I've been thinking about a solid design for a planer sled for a bit now, but never thought of using carriage bolts/all thread to hold it all together. Thanks for sharing that!
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post #29 of 32 Old 02-27-2013, 01:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BKBuilds View Post
My Dewalt 735 planer does 13" wide boards and its small enough to sit in the back of my shop and not take up much space.
your planer doesnt flatten boards.... its a planer not a joiner.....
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post #30 of 32 Old 02-27-2013, 01:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyjames

your planer doesnt flatten boards.... its a planer not a joiner.....
Tell that to my flat stock :)

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sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

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post #31 of 32 Old 02-27-2013, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by jimmyjames View Post
your planer doesnt flatten boards.... its a planer not a joiner.....
Did you read the posts above about sleds?

George
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post #32 of 32 Old 02-28-2013, 09:07 AM Thread Starter
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I have read about sleds but at the end of the day I do not see how it really makes a difference. Even in a sled the pinch rollers push the wood flat so if there is cupping on the other side it will spring back cupped when it comes out. If the cupping is on the side being planed it too gets pressed flat and while it is true that some skimming would happen where it would be flat. If a planer was all you needed in your shop to handle these issues then there would be no need for a jointer would there? Even if you can get it flat, the idea of the jointer is to flatten 1 side and then 1 edge so you have a square edge for cutting on a table saw. So now if you run it through a sled how do you square your edge to the back? Do you run that through your planer as well?

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