2" live edge ash slabs joining help - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 08-04-2018, 04:06 PM Thread Starter
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2" live edge ash slabs joining help

I have two live edge book matched ash slaps that are 2" thick. I cut them as straight as I could and there pretty dead on up the center where they will be joined. I had them run through a joiner plainer as well after cutting them but the edges re still not nag on perfect . I want them to be seamless Please Help... I was told to chamfer them so i may try this with my plainer . HELP NEEDED FROM please see pics.. i also used some dark walnut for the bow tie inlays in to hold the crack together all done by hand no templates.
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post #2 of 12 Old 08-04-2018, 04:29 PM
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I have successfully created two perfectly mater edges by clamping them to a bench (raised slightly) and spaced together so the gap is just slightly smaller than my router bit. I then set up a straight edge along one of the pieces and ran my router through. You will get two perfect edges to join.

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post #3 of 12 Old 08-04-2018, 04:49 PM Thread Starter
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HI
p
Thanks for the reply. o from what I gather I need to clamp the pieces to a bench and space them evenly apart say 1/32nd smaller then the diameter of the router bit and run it through both of them at the same time (long the straight edge of course)

What type of bit should i use. it sound much easier then chamfering thm by hand with plainer (hell)
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post #4 of 12 Old 08-04-2018, 08:45 PM
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I found this detailed description on the Woodworkers Guild of America site that describes the process I used many years ago. The pieces I did for our kitchen table were only 3/4” thick. Since you are dealing with 2” thick stock you will either need a long bit or a short bit to establish a reference surface then follow it up with with a flush trim bit. I’d go for a long bit if possible.

Projects often call for edge-to-edge joints on long boards, but long boards can be difficult to handle on a jointer. If you don’t get a good glue edge, you won’t have a good glue joint. An easier approach for jointing long stock is using a handheld router with a steel stud as a guide.

I prefer a 1/2 in. diameter spiral bit for this operation, but a straight bit would work fine. You’ll need a piece of sacrificial material you can cut into. It should be slightly wider and longer than the boards you want to joint. Spacers are required to lift the sacrificial board off the bench. 2 in. x 2 in. work great. Grab some clamps to secure the work.

The spacer blocks are critical for this process to work correctly. You need two that are slightly thinner than the diameter of the cutter you’re using. We’ll call these bit spacers. Because plywood tends to run undersized, 1/2 in. plywood works well with 1/2 in. bits. You need another set of spacers that are slightly (1/32 in.) wider than the distance from the edge of the cutter to the edge of the router base. We’ll call these base spacers.

Position the material to be jointed by clamping one board to the sacrificial board. Place the bit spacers against the clamped board and snug the second board up against the spacers.

Push the base spacers against the bit spacers (which should still be on edge between the two boards), and the steel stud against the base spacers. Clamp the stud to the sacrificial board, which also secures the second board you’re jointing. You may need to use filler blocks inside the stud in order to clamp it.

Remember that you’ll be climb cutting on one board, so you need to be sure to maintain good control of the router. It’s OK to make the cut in multiple passes with slight increases of depth on each pass. This approach will be especially important if the edges you’re starting with are very irregular. Eventually you need the depth of cut of your router bit to be slightly greater than the thickness of the material you’re working with.

Use a shop vacuum to clean up the dust created by the cut. Remove the clamps and slide the two boards together, checking the fit of the joint. If the edges are really crooked, you may need to make the cut twice, setting everything up again using the bit spacers and base spacers. You should be able to slide the joint closed with hand pressure.

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post #5 of 12 Old 08-04-2018, 09:20 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Aw heck ...

Just use a circular saw and a straight edge. No climb cutting, no fussy spacing, no extra long router bits.... Just butt them together and run your saw down the seam. Done.

The "plane" or surface area of the blade on a circular saw is about 8" wide. The router bit is 1/2" Any variation or wobble in your router against the guide will show as a "blip" in the joint. A slight variation in the circular saw will not show in the joint, but do your best to hold registration. Butt them together to see how it work. If not good enough try it again.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 12 Old 08-05-2018, 09:28 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Woodnthings

That is how I cut them with a skill saw. I used a long stainless straight edge and she went great. I want my the slabs to appear seamless but when I put the two slabs together I get that small eye sore. Maybe I wasn't asking the question the right way. Any advie I can end more pics if you needs better idea let me know and thanks again
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post #7 of 12 Old 08-05-2018, 09:48 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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cutting VS jointing ...

Did you butt them together and run the saw down the intersection?

That's how you "joint" them with a circular saw. The saw kerf takes a small amount off each plank, leaving a kerf that's blade width between them. That's way different than cutting them using a straight edge on each piece.

Then you butt them together again and check your progress. If it's not perfect do it one more time. It's natural for the wood to move just slightly until you clamp them together, so joint them and glue them up as quickly as possible. The glue will hold them securely and let it dry overnight before removing the clamps. BTW, you will need some long clamps.

Some "purists" will just use dowels or a spline and no glue, which allows for wood to move, but that's not my preferred choice.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-05-2018 at 09:54 AM.
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post #8 of 12 Old 08-05-2018, 10:00 AM
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The circular saw and straight edge would work. But the straight edge needs to be rigid with no flexing. And the slabs need to be perfectly flat with no cupping or twist else the saw blade will not cut perfect right angles.

Edit: If you cut them at the same time as Woodenthings suggests, whatever error there is would be mirrored.

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Last edited by Maylar; 08-05-2018 at 10:02 AM.
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post #9 of 12 Old 08-06-2018, 09:03 AM Thread Starter
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HI Maylar

Yes I think that is the problem. The boards are a raw live edge mo millwork was done to them. They Are not flat at all and do have some twisting in them. I did cut them with a skill saw and solid clamp straight edge but no luck . I wanted to build a router box and mill the tops but the whole board is slightly twisted. I also think they are not dried as much as the seller mentioned. She said they were dried for two years. Not sure I ma at a loss for words now. I had put in many house cutting out walnut bow tie inlays and routeing/chiseling out the ash t fit them in. I just recently put the board together for a test fit and the gap is even bigger. They touch a thte ends but no longer in the center. I think I may cut them or plin them with a jointer again and join them right away
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post #10 of 12 Old 08-06-2018, 09:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Just use a circular saw and a straight edge. No climb cutting, no fussy spacing, no extra long router bits.... Just butt them together and run your saw down the seam. Done.

The "plane" or surface area of the blade on a circular saw is about 8" wide. The router bit is 1/2" Any variation or wobble in your router against the guide will show as a "blip" in the joint. A slight variation in the circular saw will not show in the joint, but do your best to hold registration. Butt them together to see how it work. If not good enough try it again.

If you want to be sure that there are no "blips" then put a straight edge on both sides of the saw. Do a practice run first with the blade up so that you can determine if the saw will not bind. Place the second straight edge so that it is just a hair width outside the saw width.


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post #11 of 12 Old 08-06-2018, 09:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyLoyer View Post
HI Maylar

Yes I think that is the problem. The boards are a raw live edge mo millwork was done to them. They Are not flat at all and do have some twisting in them. I did cut them with a skill saw and solid clamp straight edge but no luck . I wanted to build a router box and mill the tops but the whole board is slightly twisted. I also think they are not dried as much as the seller mentioned. She said they were dried for two years. Not sure I ma at a loss for words now. I had put in many house cutting out walnut bow tie inlays and routeing/chiseling out the ash t fit them in. I just recently put the board together for a test fit and the gap is even bigger. They touch a thte ends but no longer in the center. I think I may cut them or plin them with a jointer again and join them right away

Ah, the new information makes a very big difference. If it was me I would back off and wait until I was sure the boards are dry. If not you will continue to have problems.


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post #12 of 12 Old 08-07-2018, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
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The supplier said they were two years air dried. plus i bought a moisture meter and it gave e a good reading as per what i read online. so i m not sure.
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