1st Post - Fixing Crack in Chair - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Steve Neul
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 Old 07-20-2017, 05:02 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 2
View Bruce S's Photo Album My Photos
1st Post - Fixing Crack in Chair

Hi! This is my first post and I am a complete newb when it comes to all things wood.

I have these great set of wood bar chairs. Unfortunately the back of one of the chairs has cracked. These chairs are very solid and even the cracked chair in question feels sturdy and held a 300 pound man recently. Because of this I would like to fill the crack with some sort of glue, resin or epoxy and keep going.

Is there a quick fix that anyone could recommend that would provide increased structural support while not being too obvious and wouldn't involve sanding/staining the wood?

Thanks for reading and any tip!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0810.jpg
Views:	88
Size:	85.3 KB
ID:	305393  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0806.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	116.1 KB
ID:	305401  

Bruce S is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 07-20-2017, 06:03 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
The easiest repair will be to force Carpenters glue deeply into the crack and clamp for 4 hours.
Before gluing, Apply painters tape on the sides where the clamp will touch. Insert a scrap of wood (like a short piece of a paint stir stick) or cardboard between the tape and the clamp. This is to prevent the clamp from damaging the wood finish.
Stop those wild parties where furniture is being thrown!

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #3 of 9 Old 07-20-2017, 07:32 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
That's not repairable. What ever fix you would make on it would not be as strong as it was originally and would be dangerous if someone sat in it and the back broke off. It will need a new leg.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 Old 07-20-2017, 07:42 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 2
View Bruce S's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
The easiest repair will be to force Carpenters glue deeply into the crack and clamp for 4 hours.
Before gluing, Apply painters tape on the sides where the clamp will touch. Insert a scrap of wood (like a short piece of a paint stir stick) or cardboard between the tape and the clamp. This is to prevent the clamp from damaging the wood finish.
Stop those wild parties where furniture is being thrown!
Thank you. Is the objective of the clamp to get the crack flush? Given the wood is popped out farthest in a place not easily clamped, would just filling it up with glue and letting it dry over days provide any use? Sorry if this is a dumb question. I guess I could get a bigger clamp that could go over the entire chair.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0812.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	90.0 KB
ID:	305409  

Bruce S is offline  
post #5 of 9 Old 07-20-2017, 09:13 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,147
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
clamping difficulty is about a 9.7

Not only is the break not separable because of "dowels" .... clamping it would be difficult because of the shapes. IF ... you can separate the broken pieces I would then use epoxy rather than glue because it will fill gaps and harden without great clamping pressure.

If you have no experience, which is implicit in your questions, I'd take the chair to an experienced woodworker who will have the clamps and knowledge to repair it. Ask for examples of previous repairs.... or references. This is not a novice project!

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #6 of 9 Old 07-20-2017, 09:19 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
It's very hard to judge the damage on your chair from one small picture on my I-pad.
Steve's opinion is the chair can't be repaired. I value his opinions.
You said in your original post the chair still seems strong even with the break.
If there are any pieces missing from the break, the damage is more severe.
If the piece is broken with a clean break, I would try to glue it back because you have a matched set and you may not be able to find a replacement to match.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #7 of 9 Old 07-21-2017, 07:39 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,340
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Even on my 24" monitor it is difficult to see the extend of the crack.

At best the crack will be difficult to fix. If not fixed properly you could have a guest sitting in that chair and it would break and then you could have a lawsuit on your hands.

I recommend that you take the job to a professional.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #8 of 9 Old 07-23-2017, 04:54 PM
novice wood hacker
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 514
View d_slat's Photo Album My Photos
I agree with Steve, the leg needs to be replaced. Even if your repair brought the leg back to its original strength, it still isn't good enough. The knot in that leg is the reason it broke, it caused a weak spot right where it takes the most stress.

Sent from my SM-G930R6 using Tapatalk
d_slat is offline  
post #9 of 9 Old 07-23-2017, 07:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
The reason I said the chair wasn't repairable is I tried to do just that at least a half dozen times and all of them failed. I started off gluing and clamping it. Then I tried doweling and gluing it. Then I tried mortising the leg out and put a spline in it. The last time I glued and doweled it and let it dry. Then I ran the entire chair over my jointer removing about 3/16" off the outer side of the leg and laminated a piece of wood about 3/16" thick back in it's place and it still broke. All of these additional repairs having to do them over was done as warranty work for free so seeing a break like that rubs me the wrong way. I finally quit attempting to repair a chair like that other than replacing the leg completely. That worked.
Toolman50 likes this.
Steve Neul is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need help fixing a bed post for daughter. shawna General Woodworking Discussion 12 04-29-2017 06:37 PM
Reporting A Post Cricket Getting Started With WoodworkingTalk 0 06-25-2014 08:28 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome