1/16" countersink for dowel - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 04-21-2017, 01:27 PM Thread Starter
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1/16" countersink for dowel

I read in the article below that it helps to countersink the drill hole for a dowel using a 1/16" countersink bit. This is the first time I am using dowels and haven't been able to find that drill bit anywhere. Thoughts?


http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwork.../joinery/dowel

Thanks

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post #2 of 10 Old 04-21-2017, 07:57 PM
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Just a slight touch with a large countersink will do the job. If you don't have a countersink, you could touch it with a larger twist drill. Maybe use a 3/8" bit over a 1/4" hole or 1/2" bit on 3/8" hole.
I've never done this step. Old furniture used smooth dowels. I don't think Fluted factory made dowels were available until the '70's.
Dowels have improved and glue has improved.
There are so many ways to join lumber, it becomes a personal favorite for choice.
Dowels, Kreg system, domino, mortise and tenon, biscuits, etc, etc.
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If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #3 of 10 Old 04-21-2017, 08:58 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Just a slight touch with a large countersink will do the job. If you don't have a countersink, you could touch it with a larger twist drill. Maybe use a 3/8" bit over a 1/4" hole or 1/2" bit on 3/8" hole.
I've never done this step. Old furniture used smooth dowels. I don't think Fluted factory made dowels were available until the '70's.
Dowels have improved and glue has improved.
There are so many ways to join lumber, it becomes a personal favorite for choice.
Dowels, Kreg system, domino, mortise and tenon, biscuits, etc, etc.
That makes sense, thanks!

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post #4 of 10 Old 04-21-2017, 10:07 PM
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There is no such countersink bit ...

The reference to 1/16" is the amount or depth or bevel, not the diameter. Any countersink bit that is larger than the hole will make that bevel on the inside of the hole.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #5 of 10 Old 04-22-2017, 02:41 AM
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Countersinking the dowel holy just makes it slightly easier to get the dowels in their proper holes during assembly. It pretty much makes a larger hole for a tiny bit of length for the dowel to slip into before the taper of the countersink forces the dowel into the hole proper. It makes a funnel pretty much.

Its helpful to be sure, but personally i wouldnt say its 100% necessary, not in wood at least. I dont think ive ever countersunk the holes for dowels, too much time for too little benefit in my opinion. I only ever countersink for screw heads. If you want to countersink for your dowels though, splurge and get a 0 flute or weldon style countersink:
https://www.amazon.com/KEO-53512-Sin...on+countersink

Theyre a little pricier than a 'standard' fluted countersink, but cut a lot smoother. If you cant find a weldon, single flutes are the next best thing. Id stay away from the 5 flute countersins for wood, they dont cut well and leave a really nasty end result. They do okay in metal though
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post #6 of 10 Old 04-22-2017, 08:11 AM
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Countersink would be OK is it cannot be seen in the final assembly. However, if it can be seen it will detract from the look.

Unless you are doing a mass assembly where time is important I see no need of it regardless. Even then it would take longer to drill the countersink than to insert the dowel.

George
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post #7 of 10 Old 04-22-2017, 08:25 AM
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bevel the dowels end

Just run the end of the dowels on a belt sander rotating them quickly to form a bevel. The bevel will make them easier to insert and drive in.This will make a cleaner joint than a countersink on the surface. Saw the dowels off and sand them flush.... done.
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post #8 of 10 Old 04-22-2017, 11:55 PM
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The reason to bevel/chamfer the edge of a dowel hole in side or face grain is because when drilled out you have exposed the inside of the hole which has end grain that can wick up anything moist. Add glue (which is moist) and it can make the edge of a raw hole swell enough to keep a joint from closing tight. No need to bother chamfering holes cut into end grain unless you haven't chamfered the other side which is face/side grain. A chamfer in one side will allow room for any swelling that may come from the other side.

4D
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post #9 of 10 Old 04-26-2017, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4DThinker View Post
The reason to bevel/chamfer the edge of a dowel hole in side or face grain is because when drilled out you have exposed the inside of the hole which has end grain that can wick up anything moist. Add glue (which is moist) and it can make the edge of a raw hole swell enough to keep a joint from closing tight. No need to bother chamfering holes cut into end grain unless you haven't chamfered the other side which is face/side grain. A chamfer in one side will allow room for any swelling that may come from the other side.

4D
Great explanation, and totally logistical, never really had the time to put it into practice, always just used some good clamps and hoped for the best.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #10 of 10 Old 05-04-2017, 06:17 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for everyone's help! I just laid the 3rd coat of Poly on my project.... just have to let it dry and put it to use. 😄
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