Saw/split cherry... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 01-26-2019, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
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Saw/split cherry...

Ideas for hand carving this thing?
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post #2 of 17 Old 01-26-2019, 06:04 PM
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What do you see in the wood? That's the only way I can carve = I have to see it.
I'd have to look at those pieces for maybe 10 minutes, maybe a year or more.
I can see a matched pair (maybe) but I'll keep them to myself.



I think its going to be a lot of saw work for the rough out then mallet and gouges.
Any appetite for power carving?


Save all the chips, shavings and sawdust = cherry is OK in the smoker.
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post #3 of 17 Old 01-26-2019, 06:49 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Brian. I have new grinder and a chain disc. I tried small spoons from another piece. Awaiting an appropriate knife, using a Stanley fixed razor and learning as I go. Getting better and control and curls.
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post #4 of 17 Old 01-29-2019, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
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This is a bit of my progression on my first spoon.
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post #5 of 17 Old 01-31-2019, 07:37 PM Thread Starter
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My North Bay Forge blade arrived. While it's a nice blade, it can't touch the smooth control I get with a Stanley razor blade. Am I crazy? I'm going to strop the NBF and see if its in need of a tuneup. Your input is appreciated.

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post #6 of 17 Old 02-01-2019, 11:44 PM
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Is that cherry wood really dry?
What bend did you buy from North Bay?
I like the J-bent profiles better than tight sweeps.
Many of the knives that I enjoy using the most are reworked from used farrier's hoof knives, $5.00 each.


No reason to go higher than 1,500 grit, somewhere between 12 and 15 degrees, total included bevel angle
Then hone with CrOx/AlOx on some sort of a dowel mandrel.
I've seen amazing video of the late Mungo Martin tuning up his favorite crooked knife with a rock and a bucket of water!


See if I can show you my tool box. Some adzes and a dozen knives are missing = old picture.
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post #7 of 17 Old 02-04-2019, 06:35 PM Thread Starter
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It's been laying on the ground for about a year.....rock hard. I picked up a straight knife, waiting in line for a Pinewood Forge bent now. Your tool chest is impressive!
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post #8 of 17 Old 02-05-2019, 04:03 PM
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Thanks. There's a pair of Mora 171 over on the left. You can see my D adze in my avatar.

I make all the other handles. The stripes are rosewood and mahogany glue-ups.
All whipping is #18 nylon cord. Yes, it does stretch a little. Yes, it must stretch to be useful.
Sharpening crooked knives and adze sweeps takes some time to learn. I buy all the blades.


Some east coast bladesmiths admit that they copy Kestrel designs. I'd rather go to the source.



The elbow adze features the "Kestrel Constant" for the handle diameter (the black part.)
The upper break from yellow to black is the "Holm Constant", the hand hold position for endurance.
That's a Kestrel "Baby Sitka" blade with maybe 2 oz extra wood from the original pattern.
I have a full Sitka gutter blade on the bench now.


If you go this way, you have to listen to your heart.

Never chop faster than your heart rate.
Sounds silly but you get to go all day if you have to.



Whatever you do, NO prying cuts just finer shaving slices. Bevel for hard dry woods maybe 15 degrees.
Some knives are surprisingly brittle but they hold a great edge for a long time.
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post #9 of 17 Old 02-09-2019, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
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Pretty enough for me. My first attempt at a cherry spoon. Learned a lot about thin curls, blade control, "listening" to the wood, patience......you name it. Had some homemade wood butter from my cutting boards....feels smooth
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post #10 of 17 Old 02-09-2019, 08:26 PM Thread Starter
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post #11 of 17 Old 02-09-2019, 08:30 PM Thread Starter
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I'll have a bent knife before my next spoon or bowl.

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post #12 of 17 Old 02-10-2019, 01:22 AM
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Your spoon looks fine. You can thin the bowl a lot more than you did. Hard wood, huh?
Then you "fake it" and thin the rim of the bowl to make the whole thing look more delicate.



The Pacific Northwest 'J' blade shape is the very best for all-purpose carving. Kestrel 'C' design. I use one of them.
I surface haft all my blades at 15 degrees and the Kestrel Constant size for me is 7/8" inch.
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post #13 of 17 Old 02-10-2019, 08:28 PM Thread Starter
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I need a good bent knife...no doubt. Yup, hard as a rock but I found that once I lightened up on pressure and angle, it responds with the snap of peeling a vegetable. I some what I thought were cracks so I stopped. Turned out they're in the grain and not throughout. Going thinner, deeper once I get a curvy blade.

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post #14 of 17 Old 02-11-2019, 02:20 AM
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True enough.
You have to learn each and every wood and learn the blade. I read that in your posts = that's good.
I learned enough about western red cedar in the first 5 years to be comfortable carving in it.


I like to make wood carving crooked (curved) knives from both new and used farrier's hoof trimming knives.
A new Hall is $50.00 here. A worn out used Hall from the farrier is $5.00. Mora, Diamond and Ukal are OK.
Mora #188 make fantastic planer knives to use with both hands on a 16" dogleg handle.


Go check out your local farrier. Here, he tosses the old knives in a box. $5.00 each is just beer money for his junk..



I bash off the factory handles (which are really OK) and make up my own to suit the size and length that I want for me.
If and when I buy blades, I still make up and haft all of them to suit myself.


Because of changing wood grain directions when you carve spoons, do your best to score both right and left handed blades.
Otherwise, a real Pacific Northwest 2-edged knive blade is the way to go.

They already come pointed so you don't need to mess with a Dremel and cutoff wheels to make your own points.
I never minded, it was just another part to learn.
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post #15 of 17 Old 02-11-2019, 05:41 PM Thread Starter
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Will do! Thank you for the advice, it does help me a lot.
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post #16 of 17 Old 02-12-2019, 02:49 PM
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I will show you examples of my knife conversions if you want.


In my avatar, you can see the big 7/75 Stubai wood carving adze (blue blade).
The blades for the D adze and the elbow adze were made by Kestrel Tool.
The adze handles and all the whipping is my handiwork.

Holm Constant and Kestrel Constant built into the designs.
I added a snail to the nose of the D adze to mark how slowly I carve!!!
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post #17 of 17 Old 02-12-2019, 03:28 PM
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There was a chiropractors office around the corner where I used to live. One day, a tree popped up carved into a spine.
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