How to Sharpen Small Tools - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 10-04-2018, 12:51 AM Thread Starter
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How to Sharpen Small Tools

Hi Everybody,

I recently purchased a bunch of tools that were used to make gun stocks. I was going to clean them up and sharpen them. How would you recomend sharpening the smaller tools pictured below?
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post #2 of 8 Old 10-04-2018, 04:25 AM
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Similar to turning tools. search the forum using the search box.
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post #3 of 8 Old 10-04-2018, 12:25 PM
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Aside from the spoon, the others look like specialized carving tool to me. They would require a highly refined keen edge, and would recommend you do more research before assuming that you know how to sharpen them. Once you know how they are used, you could then learn how they are to be sharpened.

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post #4 of 8 Old 10-04-2018, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you! I will do some more research on the tools
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post #5 of 8 Old 11-04-2018, 03:52 PM
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I've been carving wood for quite a while. Different styles of tools, too.

Those look like stock inletting tools, maybe a Vee tool for chequering, hard to say.
First, you have got to identify the bevel edge shapes. Maybe some specialty methods.


Then there are maybe half a dozen different sharpening techniques.
Huge differences in the price of the needed materials.

Not one is any much better than the rest to get what is called "carving sharp".
Shaving sharp is for whiskers. Useless for hard woods.

They all take time to learn, they all make the very same result. It's a learned skill.


I have no machinery for sharpening. I was taught freehand for 6(?) different bevel angles.
A few straight edges but mostly sweeping curves.
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post #6 of 8 Old 11-05-2018, 11:48 AM
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I did stock work many years ago but never seen these. I bet they are real oldtimers. My checkering tool is much different than that small V tool. If that is for checkering, it would make a wide groove. Sharpening should have something on this forum or the Internet.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #7 of 8 Old 11-05-2018, 03:23 PM
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Sharpening small tools is just difficult. If the curve of the chisel is so much you can't get a slip stone in then you end up having to hone for twice as long on one side to get rid of the burrs. The nice thing is you don't use those near as much so you don't have to sharpen them as often.

Get yourself a selection of Arkansas stones and keep them in water 24/7. Never use honing oil. Honing is kind of like sanding. You start with coarse and work your way to fine removing the burrs from the edge from grinding. You can run the end of your fingernail over larger chisels to tell if you have got the burrs off. You can feel every one of them. It's a matter of polishing. You polish an edge on a chisel and when you think you have it honed sufficient then strop it on a piece of leather loaded down with jewelers rouge just like the old time barbers did with straight razors. The sharper you get the chisel the better it will work and more enjoyable it will be to use. The softer wood you use requires sharper chisels because soft wood tends to tear.
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post #8 of 8 Old 11-06-2018, 12:48 PM
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Sharpening wood carving tools is a learned skill like any other. Takes practice.
First, you have to know exactly what the edge profile is for each tool.


For example, the top one could, in fact, be either a fluteroni or a macaroni.
Probably the little one, 6mm, they are made in 3 sizes: 6mm, 11mm & 13mm widths.
The fluteroni has rounded shoulders, the macaroni is flat square.
Which one is it? Let an experienced carver figure it out and do the first sharpening.


The process can be done economically with 3M fine automotive wet&dry sandpapers on a hard surface.
When it comes to the final honing, use box card or file folder, leather is too soft.
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