HF Dust Collector on 220v? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 04-06-2018, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
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HF Dust Collector on 220v?

Does anyone know if a 2hp Harbor Freight dust collector can be wired to run on 220v? I'm having a new shop wired and was told 220 would be much more efficient but I do not know if the HF can be wired to run on 220v. Thanks!

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post #2 of 13 Old 04-06-2018, 05:38 PM
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the product decription says no

The only voltage listed is 120 volts:
https://www.harborfreight.com/70-gal...tor-61790.html

also on page 3 of the user manual:
https://manuals.harborfreight.com/ma...1999/61790.pdf

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-06-2018 at 05:40 PM.
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post #3 of 13 Old 04-06-2018, 05:40 PM
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If it was me I would go to the nearest Harbor Freight store and look at their machines.

What do you mean by "much more efficient?"

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post #4 of 13 Old 04-06-2018, 05:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MeasureTwice View Post
Does anyone know if a 2hp Harbor Freight dust collector can be wired to run on 220v? I'm having a new shop wired and was told 220 would be much more efficient but I do not know if the HF can be wired to run on 220v. Thanks!
The model 97869 dust collector is 120v only.
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post #5 of 13 Old 04-06-2018, 06:57 PM
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220 volt will allow it to come up to full speed faster and is easier on the motor. It doesn't really effect "efficiency" (other than the shortened start up time I suppose).
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post #6 of 13 Old 04-07-2018, 09:28 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks to all. I figured as much but needed to check before finalizing the shop wiring. Pardon the misuse of the word "efficient". I was trying to imply that 220 is overall better on a motor.

Thanks again!

"It don't take all kinds, there just are all kinds"
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post #7 of 13 Old 04-07-2018, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MeasureTwice View Post
Thanks to all. I figured as much but needed to check before finalizing the shop wiring. Pardon the misuse of the word "efficient". I was trying to imply that 220 is overall better on a motor.

Thanks again!
The biggest difference is a 120v motor has just one magnetic field and if you use it continuously all day it is more likely to develop heat. With 220v it has two magnetic fields which divides the work load.
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post #8 of 13 Old 04-07-2018, 10:47 AM
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The above may be true ... I donno?

This quote from Fine Woodworking explains it a bit differently:

http://forums.finewoodworking.com/fi...20-v-table-saw

All convertable 120/240 motors run on 120 volts internally. There are two coils each running 120 volts and using 1/2 the 120 volt amperage (The coils act as a resistance and split the amperage). All you do when you re-wire the motor to run on 240 is change the wiring connecting of the coils from parallel to series. When wired for 240 volt operation, one 120 volt leg and its associated amperage is routed to each individual coil rather than a single 120 volt line providing 120 volts to both coils. The same voltage and amperage runs through the individual coils no matter how it it wired. It is amperage that creates heat, and because the amperage in each coil is the same for both wiring configurations, there is no difference in the heat produced by either wiring configuration. The motor is perfectly happy with either voltage and doesn't even know you made the change.

The OP's question has been answered long ago since the HF motor is not voltage convertible from 120 volts to 240 volts.
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post #9 of 13 Old 04-07-2018, 11:14 AM
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Another thought on 110/220... I purchased my new TS as 220 since I only have a 40A subpanel feeding my garage/shop. Since the TS uses about 1/2 the amps as 110 I figure I have less load on the panel along with leaving extra amps for running a DC along with lights and heat. I have considered wiring the DC 220 if I add air-conditioning to the shop/garage. That's my thinking anyways...

Retired VW Tech, performance boats until 9/17 STROKE! Now making sawdust to keep busy!
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post #10 of 13 Old 04-07-2018, 02:25 PM
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PA WOODCHUCK - I highly suggest you consider adding a Thien baffle to the DC. This is an inexpensive way to increase the efficiency of the DC. Most likely at the best you will do with the HF-DC is stopping particles 5 microns or large, you need to be down to the 0.5 microns. Following are some great resources - warning - it will take you a few hours to go through all of the following.
1. The Steampunk Workshop, Jake Von Slatt, http://steampunkworkshop.com/respirator.shtml/
2. Thien Baffle or Cyclone: Efficiency Comparison, YouCanMakeThisToo,
3. Characterizing the cyclone, Matthias Wandel,
and https://woodgears.ca/dust_collector/thien.html
4. Cyclone and Dust Collection Research, Bill Pentz, https://billpentz.com/woodworking/cy....cfm#index.cfm
5. The Thien Cyclone Separator Lid w/ the Thien Cyclone Separator Baffle, Phil Thien, http://www.jpthien.com/cy.htm and forum at http://www.jpthien.com/smf/
6. Search from Lumberjocks on Thien - http://lumberjocks.com/search_result...&sa.x=0&sa.y=0
7. My HF-DC conversion http://lumberjocks.com/topics/100962
8. Clearvue, http://www.clearvuecyclones.com/
The area of DC can take you down numerous rabbit holes, great experience but very time consuming. I was happy with my HF-DC conversion and sold it before my last move across country to conserve space. At this time I will be making another move and depending on the new shop I plan to get a 5HP Clear Vue.
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post #11 of 13 Old 04-07-2018, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA WOODCHUCK View Post
Another thought on 110/220... I purchased my new TS as 220 since I only have a 40A subpanel feeding my garage/shop. Since the TS uses about 1/2 the amps as 110 I figure I have less load on the panel along with leaving extra amps for running a DC along with lights and heat. I have considered wiring the DC 220 if I add air-conditioning to the shop/garage. That's my thinking anyways...


Correction: I have the Jet DC-cyclone with filter and not a HF unit

Retired VW Tech, performance boats until 9/17 STROKE! Now making sawdust to keep busy!
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post #12 of 13 Old 05-13-2018, 01:01 PM
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120 Volt only. If you are closing your walls I would run a 120 volt line & a 240 volt line for possible future use.

Bob making sawdust in SW Louisiana
with a EX-21
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post #13 of 13 Old 05-13-2018, 03:52 PM
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not like a 120 vs 240 wire is bigger or anything
any dedicated 120v receptacle can be rewired to 240v given you have space for the breaker and receptacle

a motor is a motor is a motor: 120v vs 240v is smoke and mirrors
same 2hp motor will produce 2hp on 120v or 480v, the cost difference is mostly in the installation cost

in a home shop:
a 2hp motor on 120v pulls 24 amps and would need #10 wire just to run
same 2hp motor on 240v pulls 12 amps and can use #14 wire

in a commercial shop:
same 2hp on 240v 3 phase pulls 6.8 amps and could be wired with #22 wire
that same 2hp motor on 120v 24 amps on 480 3 phase power would draw 3.4 amps

while this really doesn't matter in home shop wiring, 30 ft of #14 vs #12 vs #10 romex is minimal
in a big industrial plant it can make a world of difference in cost where you can have miles and miles of wires
the smallest wire you can use in a house is #14 for 15 amp circuits, in a plant we can use #14 for 25 amp loads


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