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post #1 of 15 Old 02-08-2008, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
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Good morning from Wisconsin

Good Morning from Wisconsin. I've decided to trade hobbies, and am finally setting up my own workshop. I have done several projects at my fathers shop over the years, but sharing a shop is kind of a hassle. With a new baby on the way and several projects i want done around the house, I wanted to get some tools of my own. So I just put my 1979 CJ7 up for sale to make room for my budding workshop. Who wants to talk table saws?
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post #2 of 15 Old 02-08-2008, 06:40 PM
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Welcome to the site giono2!
If you look around this cool forum, there is a ton of threads on table saws. It was a really hot topic for a while.

Did you say tool sale?
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post #3 of 15 Old 02-08-2008, 08:13 PM
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Good evening from Illinois. I had a mid 70's CJ5, V8, it really liked to drink gas...but I pulled more that one stump with it. Come to think of it I had a early 60's Kaiser Jeep, military issue with a factor trencher on the back when I had my plumbing shop. I will have to find a picture. That thing was a workhorse, I cut right across a paved road one time with it. Really neat machine PTO driven hydraulics, it would dig a trench 8" wide and 5' deep about 3MPH. I wish I never sold it now.
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post #4 of 15 Old 02-08-2008, 10:10 PM Thread Starter
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that sounds wild. I'd love to see some pics.
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post #5 of 15 Old 02-09-2008, 11:45 AM
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welcome giono, was the jeep your other hobby you are giving up?
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post #6 of 15 Old 02-09-2008, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by giono2 View Post
that sounds wild. I'd love to see some pics.
It was wild. I still have not found a picture of mine. It was painted bright yellow, after military service it was used by a power company. I bought it auction, $900, ran like a top. I welded a tow bar for the front and hauled it everywhere. I should have never sold it, but the yard was full and a guy offered me twice what I had paid for it. I had not used it for a year, I closed my plumbing shop in 2004 (?).

Here is a link with more info on them. http://www.film.queensu.ca/cj3B/Lite...epATrench.html
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post #7 of 15 Old 02-10-2008, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by giono2 View Post
Good Morning from Wisconsin. I've decided to trade hobbies, and am finally setting up my own workshop. I have done several projects at my fathers shop over the years, but sharing a shop is kind of a hassle. With a new baby on the way and several projects i want done around the house, I wanted to get some tools of my own. So I just put my 1979 CJ7 up for sale to make room for my budding workshop. Who wants to talk table saws?
I am from Wisconsin, as well, and with retirement coming up, am also getting into woodworking. I am investing in Festool equipment from Germany. Just as accurate as a table saw, or more, and way safer. I have a Bosch TS, but am sort of afraid of it. Good luck

Rich from Greenfield, WI
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post #8 of 15 Old 02-10-2008, 01:39 PM
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Maybe some of you pro's can offer some advice. I plan on refinishing the kitchen cupboard doors and drawer fronts. I want to sand and re-finish them in place, but was wondering how vertical surfaces work out. Will the finish sag and cause problems? Do I have to remove them and lay them over saw horses to do a proper job? Please let me know your opinions.

Rich in Greenfield, WI
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post #9 of 15 Old 02-10-2008, 02:11 PM
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. . . I have a Bosch TS, but am sort of afraid of it . . . Maybe some of you pro's can offer some advice.
Yes, send the saw to me.


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Do I have to remove them and lay them over saw horses to do a proper job?
No, you shouldn't apply enough of any type of finish, at one time, that would allow for runs. Epoxy is the exception but that's not relevant here. Most pro finishers, that doesn't include me, shoot their finishes with the doors vertical whether they use hangers or lean them against a jig designed for it. Most use hangers I think.

What type of finish are you planning to use, and how are you going to apply it?
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post #10 of 15 Old 02-10-2008, 06:46 PM
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Yes, send the saw to me.




No, you shouldn't apply enough of any type of finish, at one time, that would allow for runs. Epoxy is the exception but that's not relevant here. Most pro finishers, that doesn't include me, shoot their finishes with the doors vertical whether they use hangers or lean them against a jig designed for it. Most use hangers I think.

What type of finish are you planning to use, and how are you going to apply it?
I plan on using just a water based finish, and want to apply it with a foam applicator, the same finish used to finish hardwood floors. I work for a flooring distributor, and they told me I might have problems finishing my cabinet doors if I leave them on. Maybe I can't use a hardwood floor finish and have to go with something else.

Rich in Greenfield, WI
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post #11 of 15 Old 02-10-2008, 10:33 PM
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. . . I work for a flooring distributor, and they told me I might have problems finishing my cabinet doors if I leave them on. . .
Those flooring guys live in a completely horizontal world. They are same type that still thinks the world is shaped like a plate. You got to take what those flooring types say, with a grain of salt.

i jest but there is some truth to it probably. Flooring finishers are so wrapped up in applying a finish all they have to worry about is not applying enough finish for it to pool. That's a far cry from finishing from any other aspect. Think about it, the vast majority of finish work is applied to vertical surfaces. This includes antique refinishing, remodeling, new construction, cabinets are always finsihed after installation. Light coats is always the order of the day when you read any book on finishing. The only finish (not stains of course) I know of that is allowed to be applied heavy is epoxy. There may be another but I am unfamiliar with it if so.

Just forget about shortcuts when yoi are finishing. It talkes time, sanding between coats for many types (read the label) and staying within the temp and humidity ranges on the can. Violate any of the rules and you ask for trouble.

1. Surface must be dry and free of . . . . .
2. Sand to obtain a smooth, uniform surface. Remove all dust . . . .
3. Stir well before and occasionally during use . . .
4. Apply a thin coat using a high quality bristle (or whatever it says) brush or appropriate pnuematic applicator . . .
5. Allow at least x hours between coats, and do not apply finish below 48F or above 110F or above 50% relative humidity.
6. Sand between coats with a fine grit (we suggest 220) to ensure a smooth surface and proper adhesion . . .
7. If furniture looks magnificent, send it to Texas Timbers . . . .

A generic label but it applies to 95% of all types of finishes.
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post #12 of 15 Old 02-11-2008, 01:44 PM Thread Starter
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welcome giono, was the jeep your other hobby you are giving up?
It was. It was in the family for years, but left sitting. Getting back to be a daily driver was just a little more work than I was into. I'd rather have my own shop than share one, so now seemed like a good time to move on.
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post #13 of 15 Old 02-12-2008, 09:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTimbers View Post
Those flooring guys live in a completely horizontal world. They are same type that still thinks the world is shaped like a plate. You got to take what those flooring types say, with a grain of salt.

i jest but there is some truth to it probably. Flooring finishers are so wrapped up in applying a finish all they have to worry about is not applying enough finish for it to pool. That's a far cry from finishing from any other aspect. Think about it, the vast majority of finish work is applied to vertical surfaces. This includes antique refinishing, remodeling, new construction, cabinets are always finsihed after installation. Light coats is always the order of the day when you read any book on finishing. The only finish (not stains of course) I know of that is allowed to be applied heavy is epoxy. There may be another but I am unfamiliar with it if so.





Just forget about shortcuts when yoi are finishing. It talkes time, sanding between coats for many types (read the label) and staying within the temp and humidity ranges on the can. Violate any of the rules and you ask for trouble.

1. Surface must be dry and free of . . . . .
2. Sand to obtain a smooth, uniform surface. Remove all dust . . . .
3. Stir well before and occasionally during use . . .
4. Apply a thin coat using a high quality bristle (or whatever it says) brush or appropriate pnuematic applicator . . .
5. Allow at least x hours between coats, and do not apply finish below 48F or above 110F or above 50% relative humidity.
6. Sand between coats with a fine grit (we suggest 220) to ensure a smooth surface and proper adhesion . . .
7. If furniture looks magnificent, send it to Texas Timbers . . . .

A generic label but it applies to 95% of all types of finishes.

You've got a great sense of humor. Thanks for your input. Makes a lot of sense. My kitchen cupboards project will have to wait till Spring. All my spare time now seems to be dealing with snow. Worst Winter I can remember in many years. I am chomping at the bit to get started in woodworking. My wife has many things for me to build, and I am eager to oblige. Take care, and thanks again.

Rich in Greenfield, WI
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post #14 of 15 Old 02-12-2008, 11:18 PM
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Hey Yall from Arkansas

Hey every one Hi from Arkansas been wood working all my life was a builder most of it, got lots of experiance even got a short finger to prove it, Moved to Arkansas on some wooded land and have access to lots of trees, looking for a sawmil even though everyone around me has one HA! Just cut some red cedar the other day, really glad I found this site.
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post #15 of 15 Old 02-20-2008, 08:32 PM
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Welcome giono2! I'm from Green Bay. Just started woodworking myself.

Oh and I drive a Jeep too!
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