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post #1 of 29 Old 11-23-2017, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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Question Feeling overwhelmed, New member, new to woodworking

HI,

I am from Lake Norman, NC. I am taking advantage of the Christmas sales to buy my first table saw. My husband has little interest in woodworking but I have always had an interest. I decided its okay for a girl (an older girl) to go ahead and go for it. I will be honest and say that I have been learning a lot terminology that until just a few days ago was a foreign language. I also have never, ever, ever run a piece of wood through a table saw. I have used a compound miter saw with great success until hubby broke it. My first goal is to build a shoe closet with floating shelves. I was blessed by a neighbor who had a shoe business with 35 pairs of gorgeous shoes for FREE, but they now need a home. I have a space but it has the useless wire racks. No need to say more.

My Dad knows quite a bit about woodworking but he lives across the country and is elderly so that is a limited source for me. The table saw I have my eye on is the Hitachi C10RJ for 299 at the big L and on A. Its a great deal and gets good reviews. Some of the future projects I have already put on the list are closet organizers for all 5 of my bedrooms, building a bump-out in my laundry room t accommodate hampers and shelves, completing the attic storage rooms with knee walls, insulation and drywall, then bin shelves, and finally a new kitchen. Oh, I forgot to add I want to maximize storage in my garden shed too with bin and tool organizers.

Do you think this saw is workable? Can I get dado blades and use them effectively with this saw? What is the opinion about getting a router and router table. I have my eye on the Bosch. Too new and I really don't know what to buy just yet. I do own a DeWalt cordless drill with all the bits, the orbital sanders, palm sanders, Wiha screwdrivers, Kreg Pocket Jig, etc.

Thanks in advance for the help!

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post #2 of 29 Old 11-23-2017, 01:11 PM
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Until you get very used to running the table saw just be sure to keep the guard on the saw. Sometimes things can go very wrong and if you don't have the training can get hurt before you know what happened.

Most things to do with woodworking are common sense. The easiest method of making the shoe closet is to install some shelf hardware such as KV-80 and then make some shelves with shoe brackets on it to lay on the shelf hardware.

The Hitachi C10RJ may not accept a dado set. It's a jobsite saw and often the shaft the blade fits on isn't long enough to use a dado set. If the store has one on display see if you can measure the shaft and see if the shaft can accept 11/16" more thickness than the single blade it has on it.

A router is a handy tool to have. Just starting out I don't think you need a router table just yet. It's more handy if you are doing large projects with repetitive tasks.
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post #3 of 29 Old 11-23-2017, 02:57 PM
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Welcome - if you hang around long enough and ask enough questions (like me) you're bound to learn quite a bit from the experts here!

They really know their stuff.

One suggestion I would make... Tell hubby "HANDS OFF MY TOOLS" unless he's going to treat them with the care you will

I'm sure you're going to do fine with your new hobby - I started about 1.5 years ago and have a great deal of fun with it during the winter - not so much during the summer (Florida's way to hot for my garage shop with no A/C).
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post #4 of 29 Old 11-23-2017, 03:25 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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a table saw can be"safe"

First off, any tool with a spinning cutter can do significant damage.
Basic tenets of table saw operation.

1. The blade spins downward as you push the work into it, or away from you. For the first several inches this works in your favor, pressing thew work slightly down on the table. Then, as the work starts to pass the rear of the blade it is lifted slightly off the table. Your job is to keep it pressed down, moving forward and in constant contact with the fence. If the work leaves the fence at the rear it will be pushed up and back toward you by the blade and it may come back with considerable force, a kick back. I started with kickbacks because they are more common than flesh cuts and are seldom reported or require a visit to the ER.

2. The larger the table, the better the work is supported, from side to side and front to rear. One of the best safety accessories you can make is a outfeed table support for your table saw. This is like having a second hand or helper to keep the work from dropping away and to keep you from reaching over a spinning blade....NO...NO...

3. You will find that ripping, cutting down the length of the work piece, on the table saw is it's best function. Cross cutting shorter lengths works OK, but longer lengths are best cut using a miter saw. When the work is large , heavy or long move the saw into it. When the work is short and small move it into the blade.

4. When your work piece is warped or twisted and will not lay flat on the table and square against the fence, you should not saw it. This is a kickback waiting to happen. How do you make certain your workpiece is straight, square and flat? For that you need a jointer, a specialized woodworking machine with a wide cutter, unlike a table saw with a narrow blade. The cutter can take small amounts off the workpiece until it's flat.

Another specialized machine is a thickness planer. Once you have a straight, flat surface coming off the jointer you can run it through the thickness planer to make it a constant thickness along it's entire length.

With the 3 machines mentioned above you can process any type of rough sawn wood within their physical limits which opens up a whole new world of woodworking possibilities. :smile3:
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-23-2017 at 03:43 PM.
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post #5 of 29 Old 11-23-2017, 03:27 PM
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Welcome to the site

Woodworking tools are pretty dangerous machines,always practice safe operation of the machines, I have been doing woodworking for about 50 years, I had never drawn much blood other than a chisel attack or two,but last 2nd of July I was cutting some stickers for a flitch of walnut I had gotten careless and let the push stick hit the back side of the saw blade on my table saw and it embedded itself in the heel of my right hand.

I am not trying to scare you off,just want to make sure you are aware of the dangers

You might want to check out Woodworking Guild of America, the guy that does most of the videos, George Vondrisca gives you some real good instruction on how to use and be safe with the various machines, I think a Gold membership is $35 well spent money if you are a novice

As far as machinery, it would be a good idea to check into different machines so you can buy what will suit your needs best. Although I sound like one I am not a salesman for Grizzly tools, but in my opinion they will give you the best bang for the buck, I have quite a few of their machines and can't say a bad word about any of them, but there are many good machines from different companies too

Stick around for a while, we will do our best to help you out any way we can
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post #6 of 29 Old 11-23-2017, 03:59 PM
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Welcome to the forum, Jean! These are very good points the guys have given you and we do hope you stick around to ask more questions and also to show photos of your new shoe closet. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Just go slowly with learning new power tools; when they're used properly they are very safe but used incorrectly they are dangerous.

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post #7 of 29 Old 11-23-2017, 04:02 PM
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The majority of closet shelving and shoe racks can be made without dados.
Dados are certainly great for shelving, but for closets they arenít necessarily needed.
You can build a very strong shoe rack using only screws. Many closet shelves and racks are built with only finish nails. So you have several choices in how to construct your new project.
I recommend buying a speed square to use with your projects.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #8 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 02:45 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. I have actually been watching his videos. And the videos for the Kreg and other tools. Very informative. I am interested in the gripper tool that you use to push material through and a feather attachment to hold the material tight. Would these help with the safety factor?
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post #9 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
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I now have a locking shed that was soley for my veggie garden but I rearranged and have included a set of my own tools. Hubby wants to do well but he just puts things anywhere and everywhere, its like Easter morning whenever you need to tighten a screw. On my compound miter saw he took the safety bolt out bc it did not let him saw to the depth he wanted. He then proceeded to cut hardiplank with the wrong blade without the safety bolt. Its a miracle we didn't have to go to the hospital but after that job my saw was done. He lost the bolt, the new blade I bought would not sit right. I cut the cord, made a few irreparable repairs and junked the saw I was not taking any chances.
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post #10 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 02:50 PM Thread Starter
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I was looking to line the closet walls with bead board, then use 2x2s to make floating shelf skeletons and top with 1/2 mdf on top and 1/4 plywood on bottom? And, trim with 1x3 popular.
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post #11 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 02:52 PM Thread Starter
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The arbor (is that the shaft?) is 5/8" on the C10RJ. I have not taken the saw out of the box so it is returnable at this point. Will that length allow me to use a dado set?
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post #12 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 02:58 PM
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Welcome to the forum. Be safe is the first rule- eye protection, ear plugs, good shoes. Don't be afraid to ask questions. My father always said the only dumb question was the one not asked.
Almost bought a cottage on LN in 1973. Wonder what the land alone would be worth.

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post #13 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 02:59 PM
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re: Gripper and feather attachment

Short answer - yes.

Longer answer - a push stick of some sort is essential for stock narrower than 8" or so and a feather board really helps keep the stock against the fence. But neither of these overcome the need to learn how to use the tablesaw safely and efficiently. Neither takes the place of good ol' common sense and safety.

In other words, just using a push stick doesn't mean the saw can't get you if you go against proper feeding techniques with the board you're cutting, for its type and density, grain direction, whether it's twisted or bowed, thin or thick, blade choice, etc.

So yes, use them. Just don't rely on them to replace learning how to feed stock, your new saw properties and its particular set of adjustments, power range, and safety features. You don't need to be afraid of the saw but you do need to have respect for what it can do and can't do. Once you get to that point, that you'll likely reach in a short period of time, you'll be on your way to safely creating projects.

Hope this helps!
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post #14 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 03:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeannag View Post
The arbor (is that the shaft?) is 5/8" on the C10RJ. I have not taken the saw out of the box so it is returnable at this point. Will that length allow me to use a dado set?
That's the diameter of the shaft, not the length. Most 10" blades have a 5/8" hole for mounting.

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post #15 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
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off to Lowes I go to look at the floor model. I don't want to open the box in case I want to return it. I will check out the others too.
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post #16 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 04:02 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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I mentioned kickback above

You can watch this video several times to see exactly why a kickback occurs. He does it safely using alight weight piece of styrofoam for the workpiece:

While shopping look for the largest table you can find. Side extensions are a great addition also. Bigger is safer in this case. If portability is a priority them you will need to make a compromise between size and weight. Light weight saws can move too easily unless they have a very secure stand.... Bosch makes an excellent saw and stand combo. Get one with a safety key so hubby can't screw it up. :frown2:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-24-2017 at 04:33 PM.
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post #17 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 04:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeannag View Post
Thanks. I have actually been watching his videos. And the videos for the Kreg and other tools. Very informative. I am interested in the gripper tool that you use to push material through and a feather attachment to hold the material tight. Would these help with the safety factor?
The most useful tool for safe operation on a table saw is a push stick.
As far as Iím concerned, thatís your #1 safety item for the TS.
Much of the other stuff is expensive fluff that a conscience woodworker may not need.
Also I always recommend standing just slightly left of the blade. Not enough to throw off your balance, just very slightly.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #18 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 04:25 PM
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Jeannag,
For Christmas I suggest you buy two new toolboxes for hand tools. One for you and one for him. Keep your assortment of hand tools in your box (you could even lock it).
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If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #19 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 04:29 PM Thread Starter
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The salesperson at Lowes measured and it is almost 3/4 of an inch long. Will that work or what table saw will work?
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post #20 of 29 Old 11-24-2017, 04:36 PM Thread Starter
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I have a tall Kobalt cabinet that locks! LOL I told him it was my paint supply cabinet, he is afraid of paint. Got to love it, he is a good sport. Never complains about all the tools or such. He does try it just isn't his thing.
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