What do I look for in new Laptop for Sketchup? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 36 Old 04-21-2017, 12:46 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
I do not know why the original question has taken so long to answer.

Sketchup is not a power program. I would believe that any major brand laptop sold on the market would handle any possible sketchup designs with ease.

For that matter they will handle any normal persons(not a gamer or user of power programs) needs also with ease.

George
Sketchup does not work at all on my old laptop with WIN 7 and it appears that there is a significant performance difference between my brand new laptop and my older 64bit desktop with Win 10.

JohnnyB
"I do what I do well, but I still like to dabble in what I dont do well"
I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.
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post #22 of 36 Old 04-21-2017, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Techsniffer View Post
You talk about workshop space with your new laptop, the smart thing to do if this is going to be used in an active working area (lots of dust and debris) is to put the laptop itself in an enclosed area and have cheap keyboard, mouse, and additional monitor possibly mounted to a wall.
Actually I just ordered a wireless keyboard and mouse mainly because it was taking up too much space on my work bench, but I also developed a bad case of tendonitis while using Sketchup due to the height of my workbench.

I've decided to build a small fold up table or shelf just for the keyboard and mouse on the side of my workbench to combat the tendonitis.

I do have an old LED Monito that I can use, but I'm still trying to find a place for it and I may have to hang it from the ceiling

JohnnyB
"I do what I do well, but I still like to dabble in what I dont do well"
I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.
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post #23 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 08:13 AM
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Sorry George, but a 200 buck laptop is **** ant won't run sketchup with any ease. And sketchup is a small basic program but every line and panel you add demands more power and memory. And once you start to add textures or use the styles it's another world. And when the computer starts to struggle then it's so bloody frustrating. they will however print off an email with ease.

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post #24 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
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I could barely draw a pencil with my old laptop and it would impossible to draw a deck or set of kitchen cabinets. :smile3:

JohnnyB
"I do what I do well, but I still like to dabble in what I dont do well"
I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.
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post #25 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 11:54 AM
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Hi Sleeper,

First feel free to direct email me if you wish to...

I only scanned parts of your OP conversation, as some of the advice just didn't seem germane, or accurate. Apologies to any and all...not meaning to offend anyone...It just didn't seem like some of the comments fit..

Good Luck if you have gotten a laptop already...!!?

As you have noted, not all computers can operated under the load created by a CAD program (including SketchUp)...

I will validate, I both teach occasionally (part time and substitute) from 3rd grade to Collegiate level several subjects...including basic Sketchup application...I run Pro Sketchup myself. I use it professionally for my blueprinting, and design work accross the gamut of projects...The main reason I went with SketchUp (some professionals hate it) is ease of use, pretty great support, it's Open Sourced Software, and the ubiquitous nature of the program. Students, clients, and anybody can get a basic version free...Most CAD (high end) is not that user friendly, supper expensive, nor easy to get up and running on...Hope the following you find helpful...

My short advice:


1......I always ask whether they are going with "free SketchUP"...or..."Professional Sketchup." IT MATTERS, as you probably know already...Even a few of the 8th graders I known are heavy CAD users...


2......If you don't want to "Geek Out" and learn all kinds of "techy stuff" just go to a vendor you trust (Big Box, Mom and Pop PC Store, or Online) and ask for a high end Gaming laptop. I don't believe you would be disappointed. These are meant for hard number crunching graphics, and can eat CAD for lunch (most of them) at the level a high end amature user is going to demand from SketchUp...


3......If you want to "Geek Out" get whatever has the most current CAD and Graphics specific targeted CPU, extra RAM, 1TB SSD (go with one external as well for your safety back up...!!!...Do this at least monthly if not weekly and PROTECT...!!!..Lost photos and work is heartbreaking !!!)...Note again, heavy use graphics cards usually... ...brings us back to something very, very close to a gaming machine oddly enough...

Hope this was of some use...

Regards,

j

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Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
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post #26 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 11:55 AM
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(apologies..??..not sure why this double posted)

Hi Sleeper,

First feel free to direct email me if you wish to...

I only scanned parts of your OP conversation, as some of the advice just didn't seem germane, or accurate. Apologies to any and all...not meaning to offend anyone...It just didn't seem like some of the comments fit..

Good Luck if you have gotten a laptop already...!!?

As you have noted, not all computers can operated under the load created by a CAD program (including SketchUp)...

I will validate, I both teach occasionally (part time and substitute) from 3rd grade to Collegiate level several subjects...including basic Sketchup application...I run Pro Sketchup myself. I use it professionally for my blueprinting, and design work accross the gamut of projects...The main reason I went with SketchUp (some professionals hate it) is ease of use, pretty great support, it's Open Sourced Software, and the ubiquitous nature of the program. Students, clients, and anybody can get a basic version free...Most CAD (high end) is not that user friendly, supper expensive, nor easy to get up and running on...Hope the following you find helpful...

My short advice:

1......I always ask whether they are going with "free SketchUP"...or..."Professional Sketchup." IT MATTERS, as you probably know already...Even a few of the 8th graders I known are heavy CAD users...


2......If you don't want to "Geek Out" and learn all kinds of "techy stuff" just go to a vendor you trust (Big Box, Mom and Pop PC Store, or Online) and ask for a high end Gaming laptop. I don't believe you would be disappointed. These are meant for hard number crunching graphics, and can eat CAD for lunch (most of them) at the level a high end amature user is going to demand from SketchUp...


3......If you want to "Geek Out" get whatever has the most current CAD and Graphics specific targeted CPU, extra RAM, 1TB SSD (go with one external as well for your safety back up...!!!...Do this at least monthly if not weekly and PROTECT...!!!..Lost photos and work is heartbreaking !!!)...Note again, heavy use graphics cards usually... ...brings us back to something very, very close to a gaming machine oddly enough...

Hope this was of some use...

Regards,

j

Tosa Tomo Designs
Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
Stephen Covey:"Seek to understand, before seeking to be understood..."

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post #27 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 06:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tobyshanks View Post
Sorry George, but a 200 buck laptop is **** ant won't run sketchup with any ease. And sketchup is a small basic program but every line and panel you add demands more power and memory. And once you start to add textures or use the styles it's another world. And when the computer starts to struggle then it's so bloody frustrating. they will however print off an email with ease.
Some people have budgets, price restraints, or don't feel like dumping a lot of money into a shop laptop. I think you are greatly exaggerating the system requirements required for Sketchup, the requirements are as follows:

64bit OS
Windows 10, 8.1, and 7
2+ GHz processor.
8+ GB RAM.
700MB of available hard-disk space.
3D class video card with 1GB of memory or higher and supports hardware acceleration. Please ensure that the video card driver supports OpenGL version 3.0 or higher and is up to date. ...
3-button, scroll-wheel mouse.

This is pretty easily found in most newer laptops in all price ranges

Maybe next time instead of telling someone that what they bought is sh!t either keep it to yourself or maybe offer advice on how they might be able to boost what they have to run better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay C. White Cloud View Post
My short advice:


1......I always ask whether they are going with "free SketchUP"...or..."Professional Sketchup." IT MATTERS, as you probably know already...Even a few of the 8th graders I known are heavy CAD users...


2......If you don't want to "Geek Out" and learn all kinds of "techy stuff" just go to a vendor you trust (Big Box, Mom and Pop PC Store, or Online) and ask for a high end Gaming laptop. I don't believe you would be disappointed. These are meant for hard number crunching graphics, and can eat CAD for lunch (most of them) at the level a high end amature user is going to demand from SketchUp...


3......If you want to "Geek Out" get whatever has the most current CAD and Graphics specific targeted CPU, extra RAM, 1TB SSD (go with one external as well for your safety back up...!!!...Do this at least monthly if not weekly and PROTECT...!!!..Lost photos and work is heartbreaking !!!)...Note again, heavy use graphics cards usually... ...brings us back to something very, very close to a gaming machine oddly enough...

Hope this was of some use...

Regards,

j
1. Free vs Pro really has no different system requirements as far hardware or OS, at best the increased features available in Pro might see higher RAM usage, but extremely unlikely to use 8G+ of ram.

2. At no point would anyone need a 'high end gaming laptop' for sketchup, thats basically telling someone they need to spend @ $2000 to run sketchup, which is stupid and silly. I think your understanding of 'gaming grade' graphics cards are incorrect and what I think you're trying to imply is that they match or exceed actual 3D Cad / Rendering video cards that are special built for the task. While gaming cards are powerful, they should not be confused with actual CAD and Design graphics cards. At either point there is no need to have a $600+ graphics card for Sketchup be it for laptop or desktop.

3. Again your advice for laptop hardware is insanely over exaggerated, really the only part of this statement that could hold true is higher RAM amounts can assist in processing things faster. Buying a SSD drive will do exactly nothing for Sketchup, as there is not a lot of read/write to the HD in a CAD program, its all processing/caching is done in RAM and CPU, and a little in GPU.

And, since you qualified your response I will follow suit, but mainly because I think it stresses my knowledge of this subject matter:
Microsoft A+ Cert
Cisco CCNA
Bachelors Degree in System Admin & Network Security
4 Years software development
3 Years Software QA Automation Engineer

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post #28 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 07:27 PM
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Techsniffer,

Your acumen in computers and programing as presented seems most sound...

It would more than exceeds my own...as the best I have been able to do is build a computer from mother board up back in the day, when my want exceeded my bank account...

I'm currently banging away on a old field deployed Samsung Intel Core i3 laptop with your suggested minimums, and I can barely open and maneuver through just a simple Timber Frame restoration project using the most current version of SketchUp Pro. I don't want a more expensive machine in the shop and the dust while working on the project site here in Texas...so it will have to do and is a barely functional minimum...

My advice here was (and is not) strictly my own, yet that of SketchUp (et al) programmers, users, as well as other professional architects/designers/PE in the field...

Sleepless (our OP) also suggested an interest in photography so per my own experience and advices from several professional photoghers I am affiliated with, I suggested the SSD drive...as it was offered to me when they became fiscally viable. There fast, dependable, and a great way to back up massive file needs found in Blueprinting, CAD, and Photo/Video editing and storage...

If you do work in CAD and Photography yourself on a regularly basis, while producing professional blueprints, PE reports, along with photo storage and editing, please do share with us the overall system formats you own or operate to do this type of work.. It would be most helpful to see, and understand.

As it is now, I hold by the friendly suggestions offered...

Tosa Tomo Designs
Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
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post #29 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 08:56 PM
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Well, it's unlikely that most people will want to spend the $4000 I invested in my system, but here you go... Custom built by me

Windows 10 Pro
CPU - $340 - Intel Core i7 6700K (Water Cooled)
RAM - GSkill DDR4 1066Mhz 32g Ram (4 x 8GB)
Motherboard - Asus Maximus IX Hero
Video Card - Asus STRIX GeForce GTX 1080 OC
Sound Card - Asus Xonar DX 7.1

Storage:
Samsung 960 Pro 512GB M2 SSD
Samsung 840 Pro SSD 256GB
And 3 WD 7200RPM 2TB drives
Just shy of 7TB total storage

3 Asus 25 In LED and 1 Acer 27in LED in a 1 and 3 config:
X
***
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post #30 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 09:21 PM
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WOW!!! Techsniffer...

Brother, things aren't quite making sense to me...??

You kinda made it plain that my suggestions were not really good ones, ill advised, and out of place, yet you are pushing a $4K machine...??

That machine of yours, by the way, would be considered the minimum to do good professional SketchUp projects...

So...as such...I can say that as a user of SketchUp, CAD and Photography professionally I still think that my advice was pretty good...

You have a awesome machine for Sketchup, so we might have to disagree on who is offering better guidance to the OP...?? A true computer professional (which clearly you are) or the professional that actually uses the software in its capacity to do work the software is actully targeted for...I would suggest I'm pretty close since the last 5th grade class I taught SketchUp to help the school's Computer Technology Teacher get better (aka more efficient) computers into the computer lab...Those actually being skinned down Gaming Computers...

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Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
Stephen Covey:"Seek to understand, before seeking to be understood..."
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post #31 of 36 Old 04-22-2017, 10:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay C. White Cloud View Post
WOW!!! Techsniffer...

Brother, things aren't quite making sense to me...??

You kinda made it plain that my suggestions were not really good ones, ill advised, and out of place, yet you are pushing a $4K machine...??

That machine of yours, by the way, would be considered the minimum to do good professional SketchUp projects...

So...as such...I can say that as a user of SketchUp, CAD and Photography professionally I still think that my advice was pretty good...

You have a awesome machine for Sketchup, so we might have to disagree on who is offering better guidance to the OP...?? A true computer professional (which clearly you are) or the professional that actually uses the software in its capacity to do work the software is actully targeted for...I would suggest I'm pretty close since the last 5th grade class I taught SketchUp to help the school's Computer Technology Teacher get better (aka more efficient) computers into the computer lab...Those actually being skinned down Gaming Computers...
Just because I have a nice computer means I can't give advice on a budget system? I've been building my own PC's for well over 20 years and I am an IT professional by trade. I have built dozens of low end and budget systems both for myself as well as family and friends. I understand Sketchup very well as well as how it interacts with the different components on a computer. And I never pushed the OP toward an expensive PC, nor did I mention they would need one like mine.

You are trying to suggest a minimum of @$2000 for a laptop for someone to use a relatively low overhead 3D design software, when in reality you can operate it smoothly without issues on systems much less expensive. Its not about having insane amounts of ram, cpu, gpu, storage etc, its about knowing what hardware specs will allow you to run specific software without issue. In Sketchup the GPU does very little in the processing of basic Sketchup items and really is only used at a higher capacity when dealing with large detailed files or ones that use animation or other effects. In the scope of using for woodworking projects a lower end system should be more than capable of meeting their needs, in a professional environment then yes, I would suggest better hardware to not impede productivity.

And as for the comment that my PC would be a minimum spec computer, that just tells me that you don't know Sketchup or computers as well as you think you do. I run many 3D Modeling applications when I create art, textures, models, animations etc for games, as well as the entire Adobe Suite of products, often simultaneously without a hiccup, and all of them are more resource intensive than Sketchup will ever be. Don't get me wrong, Sketchup is nice software, but its not nearly as powerful as many other software applications, and it surely isn't the defacto 3D software high end companies use when they are building things that cost millions or billions of dollars.

In the end from a technical standpoint, you are incorrect about the suggestions you made for the OP both related to the software requirements and your justifications for the components. I offered factual information as a counterpoint to the misinformation you stated. But I can see how this thread is turning, I've said my piece and I'm over it.

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post #32 of 36 Old 04-23-2017, 11:03 AM Thread Starter
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This reminds me of the mid 80s when I bought my first Tandy 1000 with 8088 processor. I also bought the first copy of MS Windows which was supposed to work on my computer according to the specs. The program came up, but then quickly came to a screeching halt as soon as I tried to do anything.

This is exactly what happened to me last year with my Asus Laptop and sketchup while riding a train across country. I thought I could work on some simple sketchup projects during my trip when I got bored like a new work bench, but each line I drew took about 5 min until it completely stopped.
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JohnnyB
"I do what I do well, but I still like to dabble in what I dont do well"
I just like to build with wood and a means to save money by doing it myself.
I've been building things out of wood for 40 years and I'm still just an amateur.
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post #33 of 36 Old 04-23-2017, 11:55 AM
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Agree to Disagree then...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Techsniffer
Just because I have a nice computer means I can't give advice on a budget system?...I understand Sketchup very well as well as how it interacts with the different components on a computer.
Not at all Sir...your voice here (I am sure) is just as welcomed as others, and gives a contrast to the conversation from a different perspective. Nevertheless, I am suggesting that a "perspective" of understanding, "...SketchUp very well..." is quite a bit different than actually working with it professionally and teaching it...

Again, clearly our experiences with "trying" to operate SketchUp software on lesser machines is very different?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Techsniffer
...You are trying to suggest a minimum of @$2000...
I don't believe once did I make mention of a price of any kind or inferred one?

I will now, as I just helped a student doing really detailed structural drawings for a Timber Frame project get into a well refurbished (and checked out) gaming machine for under $800...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Techsniffer
when in reality you can operate it smoothly without issues on systems... much less expensive.
Perhaps you can..??..because you are tech savvy, or perhaps for some other reason I can't speak to?

I am sharing from over 15 years working with the program professionally that this is not my experience at all...It seems the OP has had similar challenge as reflected in his posts here, as have other collegues that I work with. None of which are tech savvy at your level (it seems) but do work with the program professionally. All giving similar advice to my owne...

Quote:
...In Sketchup the GPU does very little in the processing of basic Sketchup items and really is only used at a higher capacity when dealing with large detailed files or ones that use animation or other effects. In the scope of using for woodworking projects a lower end system should be more than capable of meeting their needs...
??...This seems to talk in a circle...It doesn't employ the GPU...??...but for detailed files it does...!!!

"Should be more than capable" is vastly different than...IS capable. Case in point a simple Woodworking Shop Teacher is struggling with the school's computer bogging down with sketchup and his students projects...Yet when they upgrade to something like I suggest in my first post, everything goes to optimal...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Techsniffer
...that just tells me that you don't know Sketchup or computers as well as you think you do...In the end from a technical standpoint, you are incorrect about the suggestions you made for the OP both related to the software requirements and your justifications for the components.
That's a perspective...but then again...which one of us actually makes their living with this software (et al) in the realm of woodworking, architectural design and teaching it?

If my "technical standpoint" was actually incorrect (not just different from your perspective) then it would not be so similar to other professionals/teachers I work with that have had similar challenges...Including those of the OP.

We will have to agree to disagree...We have different perspectives on the subject and can leave it to the OP (and other readers) what works best for them...

Tosa Tomo Designs
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post #34 of 36 Old 04-23-2017, 03:51 PM
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This got serious. Fact, The bigger the design and detail the more processing and graphics power is needed. Fact, money buys more. Fact, gaming pcs are made for exactly what sketchup needs. Fact, cheap laptops are crap. The original question was for a spec that would cope with reasonably sized and detailed products and the point has become mout. Arguing about the technical specs of graphics cards and motherboards and processors and your experience is not helping anyone with basic computer knowledge to know the answer. Sketchup is a 3D design program, a simple program but with no limits as to how far you go, the question is what do you need to do what you want.

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post #35 of 36 Old 04-23-2017, 04:27 PM
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Thanks Toby...I agree...good post, to the point, and back on track...

Tosa Tomo Designs
Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
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post #36 of 36 Old 04-24-2017, 03:00 PM
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As others have stated, Sketchup is pretty lightweight and pretty much any laptop you buy today should run it well enough to be productive. Remember that 3D games have been around for decades and ran on common hardware then, which was orders of magnitude slower than anything you would buy today. We're not talking about photorealistic professional design software here...


If your computer is having trouble, the problem isn't the hardware specs...something else is going on. Bad graphics drivers could be a culprit.

For me, I have a five year old laptop I bought used off Craigslist two years ago for $300. I can smoothly use Sketchup, pan around models, all that stuff...no lag whatsoever. The most important thing IMO is a good keyboard and mouse. You'll spend more time fighting poor examples of these than you would waiting on a slow computer. Nothing worse than the crappy touchpads and keyboards on many laptops these days!

Last edited by desertsp; 04-24-2017 at 03:06 PM.
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