interior shop walls - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 01-12-2018, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
eaglecap
 
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Question interior shop walls

I'm lucky enough to be building a brand new shop, sort of as a retirement gift to myself and my wife. I've been busy planning the layout of tools and benches for the 14' X 30' space, so I will probably have several questions for you veterans. For right now, I'm curious about how best to cover the inside walls after they're insulated. I'd prefer not to use sheetrock and have a chance at some roughcut 1" pine, varying widths from 6" to 12". I now I would have to deal with some shrinkage, even after it's cured, but I have no idea if it would be tolerable or not. do any of you have any experience with something like this? I'd thought about using a table saw to put shiplap edges on it, but think that would be a monumental task, so I'd probably have to go with flat butt seams.

I'd appreciate any insight you might be able to offer.
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post #2 of 17 Old 01-12-2018, 03:47 PM
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Honestly, I'd use sheetrock. The light color makes a room brighter without paint, and it has at least a little sound deadening.

Dave in CT, USA
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post #3 of 17 Old 01-12-2018, 04:15 PM
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I am a BIG pegboard fan. When I remodeled my retail store location and built on a new section I used a "fancy" pegboard throughout. It really is most useful.

When I added 12' to the length of my garage I again used pegboard over the insulation.
That gave me an additional 24 feet of very valuable space to hand garden tools, woodworking tools and just about anything else y ou can think about. There is absolutely no reason to waste all of that valuable space with sheet-rock or pine.

George
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post #4 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 04:14 AM
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Iím not much on pegboard walls but pegboard is available in pre-finished colored paneling.
The pre-finished peg board has a durable slick finish that reflects light well and is available in many colors and designs.
This might save the steps of tape and bed (for sheetrock) and painting of unfinished walls.
My own shop has Sheetrock walls and ceilings.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #5 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 04:46 AM
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I'd throw a vote out for 1/2" plywood or OSB painted white. It's durable and you can screw anything anywhere to the walls.
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post #6 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 07:23 AM
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I like slatwall instead of pegboard myself. Google images "slatwall workshop"... I have a couple of walls in my shop done with slatwall and I love it.
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post #7 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 08:28 AM
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Sheet rock has a habit of getting gouges, dented, scratched. I put up OSB- cheap and one of these days I'm going to paint the shop with a white paint.
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post #8 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 11:06 AM
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I went with OSB in the last shop we built, and painted it white, the first 2 shops were lined with 3 inch foil backed duct wrap, the third was 2 inch foil lined foam board, an one shop with nothing

Just be aware it really sucks up the paint but it makes it a lot brighter inside
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post #9 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 11:50 AM
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I like that you started your post with you're lucky enough to build a brand new shop. Great outlook and I envy you with your project. There are two ways to answer your question about what to use so I will share my thoughts:

1) if you want to use 6-12" wide boards, and they are not well seasoned, you could have 1/4-1/2" shrinkage. Yes, a shiplap would help conceal the back of the openings and if you choose to do that, the easiest way to do it is with a router and a rabbiting bit. Clamp down the board and run your router down the edge. That way you'r not having to manage an long board on a router table, or table saw if you use a dado stack.

2) there are 2 ways to look at the walls in your shop. If you want them to look nice (more like a house), you could use drywall or decorative panelling sheets. If you want them to function as storage, I suggest using wood so you can easily mount things to the wall.

I've chosen to make my shop look nice and functional as well. My solution is to use a white brick design paneling for the lower portion of the wall as it looks nice and it's a light color. The upper portion of the wall is 3/4" maple plywood. On the plywood I've hung french cleats across the wall which allows me to hang tools, shelves, jigs, etc. in a way that's flexible to change as my tool/jig collection changes over time.

This was a little long, but I hope it helps. Let me know if you have questions or want some photos.

Scott Bennett - Sharing the enjoyment of woodworking via Woodshop Therapy.
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post #10 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 12:00 PM
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My shop building is divided into three sections, woodshop, automotive shop, and motorcycle and tool storage. In my woodshop, I used tongue and groove pine run horizontally on the walls with a drywall ceiling. In the auto shop, the walls are drywall and the ceiling is T & G pine. The motorcycle section is unfinished.
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post #11 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 01:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawkmph View Post
My shop building is divided into three sections, woodshop, automotive shop, and motorcycle and tool storage. In my woodshop, I used tongue and groove pine run horizontally on the walls with a drywall ceiling. In the auto shop, the walls are drywall and the ceiling is T & G pine. The motorcycle section is unfinished.
Mike Hawkins
I like your hand tools collection there!
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post #12 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 04:26 PM
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Mine has OSB on the bottom half of most of the walls and pegboard (silver and brown depending on when it was added) on the top half.
One thing to be sure to do is wrap the exterior before putting up the siding. If you go with any interior finish that has any gaps then the wind will find it's way into your shop. Speaking from experience. I am residing my shop one side at a time and wrapping as I go. What a difference.
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post #13 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 06:04 PM
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A designated woodshop generates lots of dust even with a dust collector. Any type of wall texture on the walls other than a smooth, slick wall will catch and hold dust over time.
The smooth flat wall is also the best a reflecting light which is important in a workshop.
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If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #14 of 17 Old 01-13-2018, 06:08 PM
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Quote:
I'd prefer not to use sheetrock...
Nasty stuff in my experience and view of it...but I'm rather old fashioned on such matters...ha, ha...

Quote:
...and have a chance at some roughcut 1" pine, varying widths from 6" to 12". I now I would have to deal with some shrinkage, even after it's cured, but I have no idea if it would be tolerable or not. do any of you have any experience with something like this? I'd thought about using a table saw to put shiplap edges on it, but think that would be a monumental task, so I'd probably have to go with flat butt seams.
The current shop is a timber frame (40'x60'...clear span 30'x60') with all wood plank walls (1"x12") and floor (2"X10") as it is now...made of splined board...Only one board misbehaved but we just slipped the spline over in the slot. All wood, including window frame material was green wood and/or not off the mill longer than 4 months. White Pine.

Wood boarding/planking can be painted if desired, and attachment points placed anywhere quite securely. I was not clear if you have built your shop yet?

Good Luck,

j

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post #15 of 17 Old 02-03-2018, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks to all of you for the guidance. I'm thinking I will go with a combination of different surfaces. The shop will be 14'X30' with one of the sides and one of the ends being exterior walls. Those walls will both have windows. For the end wall, I think I'll take a router to the pine boards to make it a coarse t&g floor to ceiling (12' ceiling). For the side wall with windows, I'm thinking about 4'X8' OSB horizontally placed sort of like a wainscotting, then t&g above to the ceiling (I'm going to have to buy the t&g router bits, might as well get the use out of them, right?). The long interior wall without windows will be OSB painted white, the short interior wall without windows will be slot board. Now, for the ceiling: I'll probably sheetrock it, but I've wondered about a metal ceiling. Rolled flashing would reflect a lot of light downward, but as nearly as I can figure, it would cost me about $350 just for materials, not to mention the scaffold time fastening it up. I even thought about corrugated roofing. Thoughts? Should I just stay simple and sheetrock it?
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post #16 of 17 Old 02-03-2018, 05:40 PM
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My thoughts exactly!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
A designated woodshop generates lots of dust even with a dust collector. Any type of wall texture on the walls other than a smooth, slick wall will catch and hold dust over time.
The smooth flat wall is also the best a reflecting light which is important in a workshop.
Both my shops have drywall on the walls and ceilings. It reflects the light and is smooth which doesn't attract dust. It was a BEAR to hang 4' X 10' sheets on the sloped ceilings and on the 11 ft flat ceiling downstairs. It was a 3 person job and even that didn't always go smoothly. I remember laying on my back on a raised scaffold pushing the sheets up with my legs while another person started the screws with an impact driver.

Mark the stud and joist locations for future hanging of shelves and other items.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #17 of 17 Old 02-03-2018, 06:49 PM
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I can tell you one thing you don't want for a shop wall, poured concrete with a brick pattern. The horizontal "mortar" joints catch dust like you wouldn't believe. I have one 22' wall of this and I have to sweep it when I sweep the floor. The top 4' of the opposite wall is white pegboard for hand tool storage.

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