Help with hand planer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 05-16-2018, 07:43 AM Thread Starter
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Help with hand planer

Hello! How are you doing?
The guys decided to make musical instruments (guitars basically) and I need to buy a manual glider. I was told that the electric hand planers are good now, but I have not dealt with them yet. I watched the video here on Youtube
and hand planer reviews. Can you say something?

As I understand it, I need to pick up gliders of different sizes, that is, that would be two or three at once.

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post #2 of 8 Old 05-16-2018, 08:09 AM
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If your just getting started I would think you need a lot of tools before you need an electric hand plane. Never heard them called a glider. If you could tell us what you are going to make and why you need an electric hand plane we could come closer to helping you out.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #3 of 8 Old 05-16-2018, 08:34 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
If your just getting started I would think you need a lot of tools before you need an electric hand plane. Never heard them called a glider. If you could tell us what you are going to make and why you need an electric hand plane we could come closer to helping you out.
To be honest, I just heard it myself too.) The carpenter told me about this in a neighboring village to which I went for advice.
The carpenter did not make music tools before, but he said that I would need a planer to perfectly polish the top and bottom decks. It's a carpenter by the way and will solve my problem with the rest of the tools (if not, I think you tell me). Just now his hand planer broke (there the blade cracked). He is already old and asked as a tuition fee "know-how"( under the name "how to make guitars") to buy him such an electric planer. That's only in a fit of happiness, I forgot to ask what exactly he needs ... This is what I turned to you.

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post #4 of 8 Old 05-16-2018, 01:22 PM
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Not sure about the application for a guitar however the hand planers are nice for some jobs.

I have the Milwaukee cordless 18 volt, I got it to adjust doors on an older home that were not standard, worked like a dream. So would have a normal hand plane, I more or less just wanted a new toy for the job.

while it has a great deal of adjustment at 32'nds of an inch, I would really struggle to work on material as thin as a guitar panel.

To make that clear, it is a lot easier to make an error with than a hand plane and that error will be several times worse with it than a hand plane.

Nothing wrong with either you have shown, would buy either but done think I would buy any for the application you are talking about.

your call
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post #5 of 8 Old 05-17-2018, 04:16 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard L View Post
Not sure about the application for a guitar however the hand planers are nice for some jobs.

I have the Milwaukee cordless 18 volt, I got it to adjust doors on an older home that were not standard, worked like a dream. So would have a normal hand plane, I more or less just wanted a new toy for the job.

while it has a great deal of adjustment at 32'nds of an inch, I would really struggle to work on material as thin as a guitar panel.

To make that clear, it is a lot easier to make an error with than a hand plane and that error will be several times worse with it than a hand plane.

Nothing wrong with either you have shown, would buy either but done think I would buy any for the application you are talking about.

your call
Thank Richard! I'll think about it. In any case, you correctly said that the subject is useful. Or maybe my mentor (the old man) has a good sense of humor and just engaged in extortion and in fact, the hand planer is not needed for him :) anyway, tnx u guys!

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post #6 of 8 Old 05-25-2018, 04:46 PM
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When I retired, I was gifted a Stanley Bailey No. 5 hand plane. Not a planer. I can hear it sing in the wood like a spoke shave does.
I need to take off a few shavings and look at the progress. Maybe some here, some there.
I'm shaping handles for Pacific Northwest First Nations elbow and D adzes. I shape all my crooked knife handles with that hand plane, too.

If I ever got any serious spruce tone wood, I think I could do a book-match glue up and plane a guitar top with that #5.
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post #7 of 8 Old 05-25-2018, 07:22 PM
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Just because the blade broke doesn't mean he needs a new planer, get new blades for it and get on with it, personally i think he's using you, get your advice from a different source.
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post #8 of 8 Old 05-26-2018, 11:22 AM
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I wonder whether there is confusion between traditional hand planes vs. a handheld electric power planer.

A hand plane has a flat bottom (usually metal) that holds a single sharp blade at an angle. The woodworker pushes the hand plane on top of the wood, using built-in knobs and handles. The hand plane takes very thin slices of the wood, and can easily achieve smoothness that is better than sandpaper. It takes skill and practice to use a hand plane. There are many different types of hand plane. See:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plane_(tool)

A handheld electric power planer does a similar job. It uses multiple blades rotated by an electric motor. I think of them more for handyman use, such as a homeowner who needs to plane the edge of a door that sticks in its frame. Perhaps they are suitable for woodworking as well.
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