dovetail .....on a house.... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By joesbucketorust
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 Old 10-11-2011, 10:42 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
jaxonquad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: alabama
Posts: 281
View jaxonquad's Photo Album My Photos
dovetail .....on a house....

I saw this today on route. There was no one home so I didn't snoop too much. Forgive the quality its my phone.
This may be common practice, but I've never seen it. Impressive to say the least.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ForumRunner_20111011_213604.jpg
Views:	890
Size:	49.3 KB
ID:	30181  

Click image for larger version

Name:	ForumRunner_20111011_213621.jpg
Views:	974
Size:	51.3 KB
ID:	30182  

jaxonquad is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to jaxonquad For This Useful Post:
jharris2 (02-06-2013)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 Old 10-11-2011, 10:46 PM
HALL OF FAMER
 
Kenbo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 8,365
View Kenbo's Photo Album My Photos
Don't know if it's common practice or not, but it sure is cool. Thanks for sharing.

There is a very fine line between a "hobby" and a "mental illness"
Kenbo is offline  
post #3 of 20 Old 10-12-2011, 03:39 AM
Senior Member
 
Longknife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Umeå, Sweden
Posts: 1,035
View Longknife's Photo Album My Photos
Log houses has been the dominant type of building in Sweden for around 1,000 years and still is popular. Different techniques has been used and there are some 250 - 300 different types of end joints. The dominant type is this

Name:  kn_knut2.jpg
Views: 2692
Size:  52.3 KB

At the end of the 1800's this type of joint became popular, similar to the one in your picture. In swedish it's called "laxknut" in direct translation meaning salmon tail joint.

Name:  kn_laxknut1.jpg
Views: 2310
Size:  48.8 KB
Longknife is offline  
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Longknife For This Useful Post:
dayid (01-26-2012), Gene Howe (10-12-2011), gideon (12-16-2012), jharris2 (02-06-2013), Kenbo (10-12-2011)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 20 Old 10-12-2011, 09:56 AM
Thumb Nailer
 
dbhost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: League City, Texas. A.K.A. Hurricane Alley
Posts: 2,454
View dbhost's Photo Album My Photos
Now that is something worth noting... I have never seen a dovetailed house before... Very cool...

Interested in my woodworking, workshop and whatnot? See http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, want to see my other interests such as hunting, fishing, off roading, and camping? See http://wildersport-outdoors.blogspot.com
dbhost is offline  
post #5 of 20 Old 10-12-2011, 10:41 AM
Forgotten but not gone
 
TexasTimbers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,677
View TexasTimbers's Photo Album My Photos
Been a long time since my nose was in one of my TF books so I can't give the history/origin of the through-dovetail used in cabin wall construction but I can tell you that is was not only common across NA & Europe but at one time, in many regions it was the most popular way to construct a cabin wall especially where only smaller timbers were available.

I stand to be corrected but where larger logs were used I think saddle notch, Swedish cope etc. would have been chosen.

If you lived in the NE or in Canada I wouldn't be much surprised to see that picture but for Alabama that's quite a find. It doesn't look very weathered to me do you think it was built recently say within the past 20 years? Perhaps a restoration of something built in the teens to 30's?




.
TexasTimbers is offline  
post #6 of 20 Old 10-12-2011, 01:22 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
jaxonquad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: alabama
Posts: 281
View jaxonquad's Photo Album My Photos
This one is right over the state line in GA. Being right between Birmingham and Atlanta, you wont see many houses over 140 years. Most were burned in the civil war.
I would guess less than 20 years old with my untrained eye. I really wish someone would have been home so I could have got a little history.
jaxonquad is offline  
post #7 of 20 Old 10-12-2011, 11:48 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 266
View AlWood's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxonquad View Post
This one is right over the state line in GA. Being right between Birmingham and Atlanta, you wont see many houses over 140 years. Most were burned in the civil war.
I would guess less than 20 years old with my untrained eye. I really wish someone would have been home so I could have got a little history.

jaxonquad, wow, for GA it must be really amazing... Besides, I've never seen one made using such thin logs, boards actually... No wonder, it was done using dovetails; a traditional (saddle) wouldn't hold...

Seeing it lightened my heart: while there are some people here who have seen those logcabins with similar joints, I doubt anybody have BUILT them; but I had... Going 55 years back, in my old country, on the south edges of Sibiria, I, with three other fellow carpenters, bult up two full-blown houses (5 walls), using logs up to 2 feet thick, saddle-like manner (you've got to make a groove all the way in the bottom side of a log, by which it will be riding on the lower log -- using your ax only!). This style houses ("izba") used to be a standard way all over Russia for a few centures, and came there, no doubt, from the West -- Sweden being the most probable original source... Nobody does it there anymore, I guess; but they used to be pretty warm in the winter...
AlWood is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to AlWood For This Useful Post:
jharris2 (02-06-2013)
post #8 of 20 Old 10-13-2011, 12:00 AM
Senior Member
 
firehawkmph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Near Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 5,026
View firehawkmph's Photo Album My Photos
Jax,
I have seen a number of dovetailed log cabins like the one in your pic here in Ohio. The funny part of your pic is the electric meter. That looks out of place there.
Mike Hawkins
firehawkmph is offline  
post #9 of 20 Old 10-13-2011, 09:22 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Georgetown, MA
Posts: 61
View Jim_Rogers's Photo Album My Photos
Send a message via Skype™ to Jim_Rogers
There are probably lots more of these houses around, it's just that you can't see the logs and dovetails as the tails were cut off flush and they put siding over the outside of the building to stop the wind from blowing in between the chinking.
When we toured Ohio years ago we did tour some log cabins built this way. And the tour guide told us that there were lots of houses that had been sided over.
You'll never know until you need to do a "re-model"....

Jim Rogers

Keep your chisels sharp.
Jim_Rogers is offline  
post #10 of 20 Old 01-24-2012, 01:00 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 14
View RandyL's Photo Album My Photos
Tons of dovetail structures up this way in Ontario. Most older buildings are smaller structures like barns and such. Many older buildings were once a main home for a family but are converted to someones cottage/cabin. Many dovetail logs that have a profile sticking out a couple inches or so sometimes fail and rot over time because the roof overhang didn't extend outwards enough to cover the corners, therefore allowed water to sit on the ledge and rot. (not sure if I explained that correctly) Plus, I'm not sure if they had any type of wood preservative to seal the logs with. Anyone know if there was any type of sealant used back then?
RandyL is offline  
post #11 of 20 Old 01-24-2012, 09:39 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
jaxonquad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: alabama
Posts: 281
View jaxonquad's Photo Album My Photos
Since I have been to this house, Ive seen 3 more within 20 miles of each other...Who knows how many Ive driven past and never gave a glance.
jaxonquad is offline  
post #12 of 20 Old 01-26-2012, 12:39 PM
I run with chisels.
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: AZ
Posts: 913
View joesbucketorust's Photo Album My Photos
Meh - dovetailed corners on a log house are nothing. You wanna impress me? Show me the second story connected to the first with a sliding dovetail.
I do like that style on the corners better than the plain stack, it gives it a bit of a flair.
Rodrat likes this.

Insert witty signature line here.
joesbucketorust is offline  
post #13 of 20 Old 09-13-2012, 01:26 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 166
View johnmark's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTimbers View Post
Been a long time since my nose was in one of my TF books so I can't give the history/origin of the through-dovetail used in cabin wall construction but I can tell you that is was not only common across NA & Europe but at one time, in many regions it was the most popular way to construct a cabin wall especially where only smaller timbers were available.

I stand to be corrected but where larger logs were used I think saddle notch, Swedish cope etc. would have been chosen.

If you lived in the NE or in Canada I wouldn't be much surprised to see that picture but for Alabama that's quite a find. It doesn't look very weathered to me do you think it was built recently say within the past 20 years? Perhaps a restoration of something built in the teens to 30's?




.

the dovetail construction helps with the weathering, and of course the roof helps, but the way the water comes off the dovetail plays its part.
johnmark is offline  
post #14 of 20 Old 01-09-2013, 03:54 PM
red
Papa Red
 
red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Denver NC
Posts: 1,165
View red's Photo Album My Photos
The dovetail corners are common place around here in the NC mountains. I'm having one built as I write this. It makes a beautiful corner detail and its strong.

Red

Red
red is offline  
post #15 of 20 Old 02-05-2013, 10:22 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 11
View cibb911's Photo Album My Photos
I haven't seen many in the south but they are semi common up north. I've made some self centering dovetail jigs for making that joint before.
cibb911 is offline  
post #16 of 20 Old 02-06-2013, 12:08 AM
Senior Member
 
Brian T.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: McBride, BC
Posts: 2,648
View Brian T.'s Photo Album My Photos
No biggie where I live at 53N.
McBride has its Centennial bash this coming summer so even the homesteads aren't very old.
I've been told that the dovetail style in the corners of houses and barns
is often a give-away of the immigrant's origins.
Brian T. is offline  
post #17 of 20 Old 02-06-2013, 12:26 AM
Senior Member
 
jharris2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,339
View jharris2's Photo Album My Photos
This is a very interesting thread.

I found this:


http://logdovetailjig.com/cutting_dovetail_notches.html

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did — in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
jharris2 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to jharris2 For This Useful Post:
AlWood (02-06-2013)
post #18 of 20 Old 02-06-2013, 02:03 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 620
View jigs-n-fixtures's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyL
Tons of dovetail structures up this way in Ontario. Most older buildings are smaller structures like barns and such. Many older buildings were once a main home for a family but are converted to someones cottage/cabin. Many dovetail logs that have a profile sticking out a couple inches or so sometimes fail and rot over time because the roof overhang didn't extend outwards enough to cover the corners, therefore allowed water to sit on the ledge and rot. (not sure if I explained that correctly) Plus, I'm not sure if they had any type of wood preservative to seal the logs with. Anyone know if there was any type of sealant used back then?
If you were rich you used linseed oil mixed with clay pigments. As the chemistry got better oil based paint evolved.
jigs-n-fixtures is offline  
post #19 of 20 Old 03-11-2013, 09:17 PM
In History is the Future
 
firemedic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: South Louisiana - Gonzales
Posts: 6,423
View firemedic's Photo Album My Photos
It was common along the gulf coast. Here are a few links that touch on the design if you are interested to read them.

These are mainly geared towards Louisiana however it is applicable to the gulf coast from La to almost Fl.

These are from the LSU museum I work with: http://www.louisiana101.com/5-2-03_lsu_rural_life.html (pay attention to the dogtrot house)

http://www.louisianafolklife.org/lt/...te/newton.html

http://www.oldhouseweb.com/architect...840-1920.shtml
firemedic is offline  
post #20 of 20 Old 12-23-2013, 09:00 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Lake Gaston, NC
Posts: 328
View Tom King's Photo Album My Photos
Notice the difference in the ones in the first post, and the one with the red "paint"? One is simpler than the other, and may allow a log to twist. The other locks them together more securely.

The first is called a "half-dovetail", and the other "full dovetail" or simply "dovetail".

Last edited by Tom King; 12-23-2013 at 10:23 PM.
Tom King is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dog House... kyle526 Project Showcase 7 07-27-2011 01:09 AM
Need help with Dog house Cheese Design & Plans 6 04-25-2010 08:17 PM
Through Dovetail verses Blind dovetail ? MuzzleMike General Woodworking Discussion 7 02-02-2010 01:12 PM
$400.00 Cat House nailgunner7 Project Showcase 12 04-03-2008 09:45 AM
Bat House Fundabug General Woodworking Discussion 14 03-17-2008 10:16 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome