Top 3 safty tips - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 35 Old 02-06-2010, 03:13 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Charleston, WV
Posts: 29
View caseysbuilding's Photo Album My Photos
Top 3 safty tips

What are 3 tips you could give to your colleagues to help keep us all safe in the shop? What are some things maybe you learned the hard way? http://www.caseysbuilding.com
caseysbuilding is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 35 Old 02-08-2010, 01:07 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,858
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
first thought was: common sense, common sense, common sense.

second thought: common sense, use tools as their designed usage, don't operate machinery when you're tired. any close calls i've had was when i chose to ignore one of these.
TimPa is offline  
post #3 of 35 Old 02-08-2010, 01:37 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,605
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Safety tips = rules

1. Pay attention and stay focused on the task at hand, no distractions, including radios, telephones, TVs or attractive nuisances or good lookin' women.

2. Murphy's Law says if something can go wrong, IE fall, slip, twist, bind, catch, stop, lift, break off, etc...it will. Prepare for that to happen and you lessen the chances. Turn off the machine before reaching for loose pieces. The bandsaw is an exception if you knock the loose piece from the back of the blade clear to the front with a scrap stick, my exception (low risk operation) only, you're on your own.

3. The Law of Gravity, states that an object in free fall accelerates at the rate of 32 ft per sec per sec. or maybe that was Newton's law I donno, but once gravity takes over there's not much left to do but wait, cover your face, prepare for the coming crash/fall etc. Example:Do not attempt catch a loose piece over a running blade.
Better to be hit by it than lose any fingers, the lesser of 2 evils here.
This has gotten me through 67 years of life relatively safely
"Common sense" is an interesting term but hard to define specifically.
The above rules are all common sense to some, but not others. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 02-08-2010 at 03:57 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 35 Old 02-10-2010, 04:37 AM
ACP
Senior Member
 
ACP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Sioux Falls, SD
Posts: 3,391
View ACP's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
1. This has gotten me through 67 years of life relatively safely
"Common sense" is an interesting term but hard to define specifically.
The above rules are all common sense to some, but not others. bill
This is so true. It is unfortunate that common sense is so uncommon.
ACP is offline  
post #5 of 35 Old 02-10-2010, 05:03 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,605
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I didn't want to post this 'cause

I didn't want to look like I'm "stickin' my chest out" but I don't get many chances these days. When I worked at GM one of my tours of duty, was as a research assistant to the Safety and Human Performance Group headed by a Dr. Kyropoulos, PHD in Thermodynamics. A brilliant and wonderful man, who was respected worldwide. He had a dry sense of humor, that if you could follow the conversation after laughing at the first sentence he would have you laughing the whole time while explaining something very complex.

So one day I said, "DR K, I was thinking about the signs on the interstate highways..and here's what I came up with. The NORTH I-75 sign and the SOUTH I-75 sign both say I-75. The word NORTH and SOUTH have the letters O,T, and H in common, only N and R and S and U differentiate them. Why not just say N or S in much larger letters, since at 70 mph, or greater, you don't have enough time to read it and both the words are the same length and have 3 common letters? " Same for EAST and WEST, both have E, S, and T in common, only E and W differentiate them. Just use E and W on the signs."

His simple response was " Bill, you have uncommon common sense",
a compliment I treasure to this day. bill



The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 02-10-2010 at 07:10 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
post #6 of 35 Old 02-10-2010, 05:36 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 16
View BIGVIN's Photo Album My Photos
NEVER NEVER stand or walk behind a table saw. When using a table saw stand to the side of the blade.
BIGVIN is offline  
post #7 of 35 Old 02-10-2010, 05:42 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,605
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Why not?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGVIN View Post
NEVER NEVER stand or walk behind a table saw. When using a table saw stand to the side of the blade.
Nothing flies off the back of the saw unless you push the workpiece off on your buddy's toes. Kickbacks come at you, at least all mine have. So unless I'm missing something here an explanation would help. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #8 of 35 Old 02-10-2010, 07:25 AM
SS user
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Snowflake, AZ
Posts: 2,690
View Gene Howe's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseysbuilding View Post
What are 3 tips you could give to your colleagues to help keep us all safe in the shop? What are some things maybe you learned the hard way? http://www.caseysbuilding.com
No jewelry AT ALL! No flipflops. No loose long sleeves.
Design and USE push sticks and finger boards for the TS and router table.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #9 of 35 Old 02-10-2010, 06:46 PM
Old Methane Gas Cloud
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 3,500
View rrich's Photo Album My Photos
I have one ABSOLUTE rule in my shop.

NO Alcohol, period.

If I think that a beer would be nice, it's time to close the shop for the day regardless if I have the beer or not. If I'm not thinking about what I'm doing in the shop, close it up for the day.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
Huntington Beach, California
Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
rrich is offline  
post #10 of 35 Old 02-10-2010, 07:52 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,605
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
You do any finishing with shellac?

You use denatured alcohol? bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #11 of 35 Old 02-11-2010, 03:18 PM
Old Methane Gas Cloud
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 3,500
View rrich's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
You use denatured alcohol? bill
Only with shellac or as anti-freeze. (Goodness, that;s going back isn't it?)

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
Huntington Beach, California
Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
rrich is offline  
post #12 of 35 Old 02-12-2010, 01:09 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: 60 mile SW of Chcago
Posts: 46
View paintr56's Photo Album My Photos
Wear a mask rated for the finish you are using those fumes will eventually get you.


Jim Bunton
painter by trade.

The Ten Commandments contain 297 words. The Bill of Rights is stated in 463 words. Lincoln's Gettysburg Address contains 266 words. A recent federal directive to regulate the price of cabbage contains 26,911 words. - Atlanta Journal
paintr56 is offline  
post #13 of 35 Old 03-21-2010, 05:35 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denver area
Posts: 236
View Burt's Photo Album My Photos
Dust collection, Air filtration, proper mask, eye protection, ear protection. AND good math skills, since I just listed 5 items.
Burt is offline  
post #14 of 35 Old 03-22-2010, 03:18 AM
Just makin chips fly
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: FL an NC
Posts: 642
View The woodsman's Photo Album My Photos
Top 3 safty tips

NEVER turn on a power tool when your angry or upset about anything.Take the time to just go and set down a bit,then when your settled down go back to work.I almost lost a few fingers on a table saw several yrs ago doin that.Also if you do turnings make sure you where a good FULL face shield.Saved my ugly mug more than once.Dust collector a must.

God Bless all
Ken Ward
The woodsman is offline  
post #15 of 35 Old 03-22-2010, 07:25 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Jesup, Iowa
Posts: 375
View kjhart0133's Photo Album My Photos
1. Always use your PPE (Personal Protection Equipment). I never enter my shop without putting on my safety glasses - and leaving them on all the time. Get a comfortable pair so you don't have an excuse to take them off. I prefer a pair of "cheaters" from Duluth Trading Co. They are wraparound and can be purchased with bifocals for those of us with presbyopia (look that one up!). There are also many sources of safety glasses for those that need prescription wear all the time. Also, steel toe, non-slip work shoes.

2. No loose clothing, long hair or dangling objects around your neck. I was in grad school in the seventies at MIT and a fellow grad student was killed when his long hair was caught in a lathe.

3. Take care of your lungs. Face masks are your first line of defense. Then use Dust Collection, and finally a filter that circulates and filters the air in your shop.

The list could go on and on, but these three are a good foundation for a safe working environment in your shop.

Kevin H.
kjhart0133 is offline  
post #16 of 35 Old 03-23-2010, 11:29 PM
Senior Member
 
Itchy Brother's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Looneyville,California
Posts: 2,357
View Itchy Brother's Photo Album My Photos
I used to do maintinence on aircraft-for 28 years.It was before most of the safety rules were enforced.I've breath one hell of a lot of chemicals on a daily basis.Methylethel Keytone,naptha.Alchohol,Triclrorethylene,Freon,Dus ts from sanding boron,fiberglass,carbon,asbestes,wood,Magnesium.Pl us 40 years of smoking ciggarettes.I'm really surprised I'm still kicking at 62.Six months ago I was having chest pains and went to Kaiser.Among a lot of other tests they did a chest exray and said everything looks good.Who knows.I wear a respirator most of the time LOL!Itchy Brother
Itchy Brother is offline  
post #17 of 35 Old 03-24-2010, 09:41 AM
Junior Member
 
Woodcrafter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Northeast Texas
Posts: 17
View Woodcrafter's Photo Album My Photos
Shop Safety

My main rule......If I'm about to make a cut that doesn't really feel safe, I STOP and try to figure another way to accomplish the task. I think that most of us have been working with tools long enough to recognize that "uncomfortable feeling" when an inherent danger looms.

"Good judgment comes from Experience.....Unfortunately, most Experience is a result of bad judgment". Will Rogers

Avatar : DeWalt Nail-Gun
Woodcrafter is offline  
post #18 of 35 Old 03-25-2010, 01:51 AM
Chester's Gorilla
 
Streamwinner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oceania
Posts: 1,275
View Streamwinner's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodcrafter View Post
My main rule......If I'm about to make a cut that doesn't really feel safe, I STOP and try to figure another way to accomplish the task. I think that most of us have been working with tools long enough to recognize that "uncomfortable feeling" when an inherent danger looms.
I agree, though I sometimes have difficulty differentiating between discomfort from something I feel is unsafe and discomfort from a lack of experience using particular equipment or techniques.
Streamwinner is offline  
post #19 of 35 Old 04-01-2010, 02:55 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1
View Dominic Marzullo's Photo Album My Photos
a guy i know who builds pool tables who has been building them for almost 40 years cut all of his fingers off wearing a glove on his table saw. he has done it thousands and thousands of times, but a few months ago it sucked his glove in and cut his fingers off.
Dominic Marzullo is offline  
post #20 of 35 Old 04-01-2010, 03:32 PM
Senior Member
 
TS3660's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Mill, SC
Posts: 1,465
View TS3660's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Marzullo View Post
a guy i know who builds pool tables who has been building them for almost 40 years cut all of his fingers off wearing a glove on his table saw. he has done it thousands and thousands of times, but a few months ago it sucked his glove in and cut his fingers off.
Oh boy. Yes, sometimes wearing safety equipment is more dangerous than not wearing it. I used to work in a place that required everyone to wear hair nets, no excuses. 3 guys in the toolroom had their head smashed against a drill press when the net got twisted up in a drill bit. Still, the rule stood. Then an old German toolmaker at that place told me "It's MY body, it should be MY decision, as long as I don't sue anyone if I get hurt." I totally agree. Sometimes it's safer to take my safety glasses off so I can actually see what I am doing than to leave them on. Yes, I might get something in my eye, but if I leave them on, I might lose a finger or hand since I can't see what I'm doing. It all comes down to your decision.

Bud

"Veggie burgers aren't bad if you put enough meat on them"
TS3660 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sketch Tips mics_54 SketchUp Help Forum 7 11-13-2009 06:22 AM
sanding tips Ella Menneau P. Wood Finishing 2 06-17-2009 07:01 PM
Any tips for a used Radial Saw Sleeper Power Tools & Machinery 21 05-01-2009 01:53 PM
New here, need some tips on how to proceed. J S Machine General Woodworking Discussion 2 11-30-2008 05:51 AM
i need spraying tips [email protected] Wood Finishing 6 06-10-2007 10:31 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome