Tips for glueing a table top? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 Old 03-13-2013, 07:14 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 189
View lateralus819's Photo Album My Photos
Tips for glueing a table top?

Hello all. I'm going to be making a new kitchen table for my home. Multiple pieces of sapele for the top. Roughly 8" wide each board.

Is there anything i should be aware of as far as my glue up? Any tips on how to make it go as smooth as possible with little problems.

Best way to minimize warping/cupping?

Im going to join 2 at a time with a total of 5 boards.
lateralus819 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 03-13-2013, 08:40 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
cabinetman is offline  
post #3 of 12 Old 03-13-2013, 12:01 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Sapele should glue very well. I normally like to run a spline in wood I use for a table top. The spline doesn't have to go all the way to the end. You could stop it 5 or 6 inches from the ends so it doesn't show.

All you can do to make the top smooth when gluing it is to align the boards together as you are gluing them. I normally snug the wood up in the clamps and take a 8 lb. sledge hammer with a block of wood and knock them down flat.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 Old 03-13-2013, 08:36 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 189
View lateralus819's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Sapele should glue very well. I normally like to run a spline in wood I use for a table top. The spline doesn't have to go all the way to the end. You could stop it 5 or 6 inches from the ends so it doesn't show.

All you can do to make the top smooth when gluing it is to align the boards together as you are gluing them. I normally snug the wood up in the clamps and take a 8 lb. sledge hammer with a block of wood and knock them down flat.
Whats the reasoning for the splines?

Visibility isn't an issue as i will trim out the edges with some maple.
lateralus819 is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 03-13-2013, 09:47 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,368
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
splines help alignment

here's a good link: http://sandal-woodsblog.com/2009/01/...ng-up-the-top/

You must reference off the good face when creating a groove however, so the good face is flush when you finish. You don't "need" them but they can be helpful if the boards have any curve to them and may walk/move when the clamp are tightened. I just glued a large panel today with a 3" QSWO border on the edges.
I used biscuits... to help align the good surface and referenced off the good face flat on the bench. This was a glue up that was my buddies, and it had warped, so I had to clamp it to the bench using a caul to get it flat. The biscuits are the same dimension up from the table that way and will auto-align when they are glued together. It went very well with the 2 of us gluing and aligning, even though he was down to one good arm from a previous surgery.
Now this my 3rd try at biscuits and I'm gettin' the hang of it more each time and liking them for alignment only, since they do not add any strength. The 4 separate trim pieces on this top were one dimension and the top was slightly thicker. So, to get them all flush on the good side, I laid that side down and ran the biscuit cutter in using the bench top as the reference.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	100_2426.jpg
Views:	224
Size:	93.9 KB
ID:	65603  

Click image for larger version

Name:	100_2427.jpg
Views:	203
Size:	89.5 KB
ID:	65604  

Click image for larger version

Name:	100_2428.jpg
Views:	208
Size:	99.5 KB
ID:	65605  


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-14-2013 at 12:21 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 03-13-2013, 10:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 103
View ATL Jack's Photo Album My Photos
If you have a membership to fine woodworking there is a good video series on making a hayrake table. One of the videos is dedicated to glueing the table top and is very good. http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/...-hayrake-table
ATL Jack is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old 03-14-2013, 01:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by lateralus819 View Post
Whats the reasoning for the splines?

Visibility isn't an issue as i will trim out the edges with some maple.
When you make a long glueup each board is trying to expand and contract different than the board next to it. This puts a lot of stress on the joint and the spline helps keep the joint from comming apart.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old 03-14-2013, 09:29 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
IMO, and experience, biscuits don't insure alignment. If there's room for glue, and the biscuit just slides in, there's room for misalignment. For a planked glue up, using cauls is a good way for getting good alignment. To further align boards that get a bit off, wedges can be tapped under the caul.

If the wood is going to exert some movement due to E&C, splines may help, but the natural forces will likely overcome the restraint provided by the spline. Something will likely crack, and it could be the spline, as it will likely be long grain (unless plywood is used).





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #9 of 12 Old 03-14-2013, 06:40 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 189
View lateralus819's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
IMO, and experience, biscuits don't insure alignment. If there's room for glue, and the biscuit just slides in, there's room for misalignment. For a planked glue up, using cauls is a good way for getting good alignment. To further align boards that get a bit off, wedges can be tapped under the caul.

If the wood is going to exert some movement due to E&C, splines may help, but the natural forces will likely overcome the restraint provided by the spline. Something will likely crack, and it could be the spline, as it will likely be long grain (unless plywood is used).





.
Is there a way i should oreient the boards..I.E. rings up/rings down/rings up etc? or it doesnt matter?
lateralus819 is offline  
post #10 of 12 Old 03-14-2013, 07:54 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by lateralus819 View Post
Is there a way i should oreient the boards..I.E. rings up/rings down/rings up etc? or it doesnt matter?
I alternate them. I don't use biscuits.





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #11 of 12 Old 03-15-2013, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 189
View lateralus819's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
I alternate them. I don't use biscuits.





.
So alternating up/down is the way to go?

Id hate to spend $200+ in lumber and have something go wrong! haha.
lateralus819 is offline  
post #12 of 12 Old 03-31-2013, 12:05 PM
Senior Member
 
RetiredLE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Eastern WA State
Posts: 308
View RetiredLE's Photo Album My Photos
I am in the process of building a dining room table for our home using 2X3's laid on edge with biscuits. As was said here, the biscuits don't insure a flat surface but they do help to keep things more or less in line when applying the clamps.

It's also important when clamping to alternate the clamps top and bottom to prevent the clamps from bowing the surface. The more clamps you have the better in my opinion - and you want to use enough glue to ensure some squeezes out.

--
When you think about it, God has to be the best inventor of all time. He took a rib from Adam and made a loudspeaker.
RetiredLE is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Any Tips on Lifting a Table Saw? Toolmaann Tips, Tricks, & Homemade Jigs 14 01-28-2013 02:43 PM
Tips For Cleaning My Table Saw Top? Seth General Woodworking Discussion 2 03-29-2011 07:52 AM
Router table tips needed wsommariva Power Tools & Machinery 10 01-17-2011 06:30 PM
Edge glueing table top 411 rkwjunior General Woodworking Discussion 5 04-19-2010 12:02 AM
Requesting tips on joining boards for table top Terry McManus General Woodworking Discussion 38 04-28-2008 11:54 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome