strips too small to safely rip? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 27 Old 08-25-2015, 08:03 PM Thread Starter
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strips too small to safely rip?

I have a lot of Honduran Rosewood scraps that are too small to safely rip on the table saw. I discovered that hot glue, from Harbor Freight, will very securely hold them to a longer scrap which I can run against the fence to safely cut off thin strips:
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Last edited by woodnthings; 08-25-2015 at 08:07 PM.
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post #2 of 27 Old 08-25-2015, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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above post continued

The Rockler thin rip jig was used to determine a constant thickness strip:
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 27 Old 08-25-2015, 08:10 PM
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Thanks for sharing your very wise move and clever idea! Be safe.
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post #4 of 27 Old 08-26-2015, 05:18 AM
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Hot glue, is there anything it isn't handy for?

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #5 of 27 Old 08-26-2015, 08:47 AM
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Thanks for sharing your very wise move and clever idea! Be safe.
Totally agree. Thanks.

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post #6 of 27 Old 08-26-2015, 09:09 PM
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That's one way to do it. Good idea.
I prefer to set the fence to desired thickness and use my pusher, with a thin push foot on it.
When doing it, I hold a piece of wood lightly against the side of the wood (before the blade) being cut to keep it against the fence.
The t track isn't used with the pusher, and the big knob, is just for pushing.
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post #7 of 27 Old 08-26-2015, 09:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirate View Post
That's one way to do it. Good idea.
I prefer to set the fence to desired thickness and use my pusher, with a thin push foot on it.
When doing it, I hold a piece of wood lightly against the side of the wood (before the blade) being cut to keep it against the fence.
The t track isn't used with the pusher, and the big knob, is just for pushing.

I do very similar to that but when they get SUPER small like in your picture - I will use another push stick with the left hand to keep the small piece tight up against the fence as the push stick from behind sends it through.

Awesome picture.
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post #8 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 12:48 AM Thread Starter
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the off fall on the left of the blade

By using a rip jig or a bump stop clamped to the table on the left of the blade the small pieces just fall safely to the left of the blade and are not trapped between the blade and the fence and don't require any special push shoe or jig to move them along.

It will take a few minutes to hot glue them to a good parallel edged scrap, but as complicated as it gets. The hot glue sticks so well I have to chisel them off or rip down the glue joint. I couldn't believe it myself.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 01:31 AM
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I have an 18" Delta scroll saw, not fancy. I clamp a fence to the plate and rip both mahogany and rosewood strips as I please. Much of it has gone into handles for wood carving tools.
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post #10 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
By using a rip jig or a bump stop clamped to the table on the left of the blade the small pieces just fall safely to the left of the blade and are not trapped between the blade and the fence and don't require any special push shoe or jig to move them along.

It will take a few minutes to hot glue them to a good parallel edged scrap, but as complicated as it gets. The hot glue sticks so well I have to chisel them off or rip down the glue joint. I couldn't believe it myself.
By far the safer way to cut thin strips, a narrow shoe will work if you know what you are doing, but I would advise anyone that is not that familiar with using a table saw to use a rip jig and have the chips fall where they may.

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post #11 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 02:28 PM Thread Starter
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just to be clear ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
By far the safer way to cut thin strips, ........is ????


a narrow shoe will work if you know what you are doing,
If you know what you are doing and know what that narrow strip that's between the blade and fence is going to do.
...


but I would advise anyone that is not that familiar with using a table saw to use a rip jig and have the chips fall where they may.
Because it's not all that safe to use a thin push shoe?


The thin rip jig is what I'm advocating here, as well as the hot glue method and a scrap. So, if you are not familiar with the table saw, it's the safer way.
Does that make more sense?

That is a pretty sophisticated thin push shoe (Pirate's) in my book. Probably worth making one if you do a lot of thin strips ...I donno?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-27-2015 at 02:32 PM.
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post #12 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 03:52 PM
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Here is another pic showing how I use a scrap of wood to hold the work against the fence. The scrap and hand holding it, don't move during the cut.
It works great, and allows cutting a 1/8" strip from a 3/16 wide piece.
The pusher holds the work down as well as pushes.
This picture shows a different foot, that is reversible, with a wider foot on the other edge.
I never had a problem with it, and can't see how a kick back could happen, with the strip being cut, constantly being pushed, until clear of the blade.
The white foot in the other picture was HTPE and warped. The one shown in this picture is about 3/16" thick, wood, and gets thinner as I cut thinner strips.
I never liked having to move the fence for each strip cut.
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post #13 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Does that make more sense?

That is a pretty sophisticated thin push shoe (Pirate's) in my book. Probably worth making one if you do a lot of thin strips ...I donno?
Bill, I was not arguing with your method I like it, most will agree it is the safer way to cut thin strips.

Guys like Pirate that know what they are doing will get along just fine with the push shoe, a rookie maybe not.

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post #14 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirate View Post
Here is another pic showing how I use a scrap of wood to hold the work against the fence. The scrap and hand holding it, don't move during the cut.
It works great, and allows cutting a 1/8" strip from a 3/16 wide piece.
The pusher holds the work down as well as pushes.
This picture shows a different foot, that is reversible, with a wider foot on the other edge.
I never had a problem with it, and can't see how a kick back could happen, with the strip being cut, constantly being pushed, until clear of the blade.
The white foot in the other picture was HTPE and warped. The one shown in this picture is about 3/16" thick, wood, and gets thinner as I cut thinner strips.
I never liked having to move the fence for each strip cut.
I have a similiar set up when I cut thin strips. I am just curious about one thing. It looks like you are useing a blade (80T?) instead of a ripping blade. Is there a reason why or do you just like to use one blade for everything?
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post #15 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirate View Post

SNIP...

I never liked having to move the fence for each strip cut.

Same here. As long as my fence stays in the same spot - I KNOW all my pieces will be the same size. Not to mention things get done faster as well...
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post #16 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 09:12 PM Thread Starter
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let's see your setup

Quote:
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Same here. As long as my fence stays in the same spot - I KNOW all my pieces will be the same size. Not to mention things get done faster as well...
You gotta a slick setup for riopping thin strips? Post it up here.
Maybe we can all learn somethin' .....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-27-2015 at 10:07 PM.
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post #17 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by mengtian View Post
I have a similiar set up when I cut thin strips. I am just curious about one thing. It looks like you are useing a blade (80T?) instead of a ripping blade. Is there a reason why or do you just like to use one blade for everything?
It's actually a 90 tooth Ridgid blade, which I really like. If I'm ripping, not real hard wood, 3/4 or less, and want a real nice cut I use it. Thicker or harder I use a rip blade.
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post #18 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 10:03 PM
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It's actually a 90 tooth Ridgid blade, which I really like. If I'm ripping, not real hard wood, 3/4 or less, and want a real nice cut I use it. Thicker or harder I use a rip blade.
I am the opposite. I keep a gluline rip blade in my saw most of the time unless I am cross cutting a lot or something thicker than 4/4.
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post #19 of 27 Old 08-27-2015, 11:40 PM
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Last time I needed strips that thin I used my bandsaw then ran them through my drum sander. This method would be way faster.
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post #20 of 27 Old 10-15-2015, 11:17 PM
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I want to rip 1/8 x 1/8 strips for inlays. I can rip the 3/4 or larger strips to 1/8" just fine, but looking for ideas how to then rip that thin strip to 1/8". I saw a home done system that looked good but now can't find it. Any ideas?
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