Must Have Jigs - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 32 Old 04-04-2017, 11:51 PM Thread Starter
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Must Have Jigs

Hi All,

I'm a newbie getting my feet wet in the wonderful world of woodworking. I just ordered a Grizzly G1023RLWX (be here Thursday ). Today I purchased a Laguna 14/12 Band Saw and I've got a router which will be mounted to my Grizzly. My question is what are some jigs that are must have's that I can make? If certain jigs are better off purchased please note the jig and recommended model. If you are aware of any good sites where I can get plans for any of the jigs that would be greatly appreciated as well.

Projects of interest: boxes, picture frames, kids toys etc. Smaller crafts, nothing big as of now.

Thank You,

Chad

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post #2 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:10 AM
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I suppose the answer to that is what do you want to make? Or, every jig imaginable or none at all.

I expect a good place to start is a table saw cross cut sled.
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post #3 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:26 AM
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I second the table saw cross cut sled for a lot of purposes, but as subroc said. We can't really make suggestions without knowing which direction with woodworking you want to go. If you're new to it, try a few different things and see what feels "right". Some people love turning, but I haven't even tried it and I can already tell I won't have the patience for it.

I thought I was always going to make larger furniture type stuff like my microwave stand, bathroom cabinets, toy boxes, etc., but I'm discovering I have a knack for little craft type things and they're actually a lot of fun. Made a little wine rack, a key holder, a kitchen utensil holder (in progress), and I'm gonna be making a sort of small shoe rack here starting tomorrow. The little things are great for my work schedule. work a few hours in the morning on them, knock them out, and go to work and show off what I did that day and get 50 questions about how I can work that hard before coming to do an 8 hour shift.
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post #4 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:26 AM Thread Starter
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Hi subroc,

I plan on making some boxes, picture frames etc. No real clear path. Just getting into the hobby and plan on going with the flow. I'm just looking for some jigs that are commonly used with a table saw, band saw and router.
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post #5 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
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renraw9002- Items you've mentioned you enjoy building is in line with some of my ideas and plans.
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post #6 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clschaffer View Post
Hi subroc,

I plan on making some boxes, picture frames etc. No real clear path. Just getting into the hobby and plan on going with the flow. I'm just looking for some jigs that are commonly used with a table saw, band saw and router.
A sled is the perfect first jig then. YouTube has several great videos that show all sorts of methods on how to make them. I expect if you watch a handful of them you will be well armed and have a clearer idea of the features you might want on a sled. That said, for a first effort keep it reasonably basic that way you will gain experience and some success from that effort.

Good luck, whatever you decide.
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post #7 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:41 AM
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Originally Posted by clschaffer View Post
renraw9002- Items you've mentioned you enjoy building is in line with some of my ideas and plans.
On that note, then assuming you don't have the money to drop on a miter saw for crosscutting. I would make a jig for your circular saw (assuming you have one) to make quick and accurate cross cuts instead of having to set up some sort of guide every time you need to make a cut. Here's mine and it's saved me a buttload of time.

Another jig I made because I definitely don't have the money for a jointer is a jig for my router to flatten rough surfaces. Obviously mine isn't nearly as accurate as a jointer would be, but so far for the projects i've done it's served me well enough.
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post #8 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:57 AM Thread Starter
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subroc and renraw9002, Thank You both for the input. Gives me something to get started on. renraw9002 I like the looks of your router jig. That's a great idea, and I'm in the same boat as you. My pockets aren't deep enough as of now for a jointer.
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post #9 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 05:45 AM
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I wouldn't be too concerned with jigs. When you make a project and see the need for a jig for something go ahead and make one. I don't keep most of the jigs I make. It's so long between the use of a particular jig it takes too much space to save them all.
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post #10 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 09:26 AM
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As already mentioned a cross-cut sled is really useful especially for long stock. If you're going to get into box making (something I'm looking at) you need to make jigs like a 45 degree cross-cut sled, angle mitre sled, keyed mitre sled, etc. A good book is "Box Making" by Doug Stowe plus there is a lot of info on You Tube.
Cheers
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post #11 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 09:26 AM
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I agree with Steve. Start building things and make a jig when you find a need. Many jigs are one-off anyway. Besides my crosscut sled I only have two jigs I keep.
One is a circle cutting jig for a router, and the other is a jig for the router table for trueing wood wheels.


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post #12 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 09:35 AM
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Good advice from previous posts. Consider adding some push sticks (various widths) and some feather boards which always are handy on projects. Add a TS sled - in straight cuts and another in 45 degree cuts. Some books on jigs/fixtures are available, and magazines (like Woodsmith & Fine woodworking) offer special issues. Also look through some WW catalogs for jigs & other items for each of your "toys", which you can probably make for a lot less $. As Steve has stated "some projects may need a jig", only if that operation on another project will be repeated. Be safe.
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post #13 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 12:11 PM Thread Starter
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Thank You All for your input. I appreciate it!!! By the way, you all make a newbie feel welcome to the hobby. This forum and it's participants have been very helpful and welcoming.
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post #14 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 03:10 PM
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If you manage to get a decent table saw spend $65 for a MiterSet jig.. You definitely won't regret it especially if you're making picture frames..
www.miterset.com
It definitely beats those fabulous 45.1853 45 angles..
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post #15 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 08:57 PM
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Build an exact width dado jig for your router.

And while we are at it, consider the Bosch 1617EVSPK router combo. The fixed base will clamp to your cast iron table on the right side of the new saw. Note: You can't relocate that wing to the left side because the motor housing is in the way, but you will find that out soon enough.

The plunge base can be used for hand held operations. I have two of those kits and at times, the bits stay in the router so I don't have to change 'em out. And I have a Triton mounted under a table. :-)

Good luck. Attached is my drawing for the dado jig. It is based on the jig The Wood Whisperer built and demonstrates in his YouTube video with the exception being the knobs are on top for easy access. It works great. All you need is a 1/2 inch pattern bit to make dados for 3/4 inch material (including 3/4 plywood that is not actually 3/4 inches thick). That is why the jig works so well. You don't have to change blades to a dado stack and try to figure out what shims to add to get the desired width of the dado. With the jig, simply stick you material in the slot, tighten the knobs, and you are ready to route.
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post #16 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 09:28 PM
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My favorite jig

This straight line rip jig save time over using a jointer to straighten edges:



I needed to straight line many, actually dozens of pieces, so I made a "jig" rather than scab on strips each time, which is way too time consuming for me.... "snap on" then rip and "snap off'"...next piece...
I made two sizes,one long enough for 8 footers and a 54" for shorter boards. I used 1/4" hardboard for the bottom and a 1 X 3" piece of Oak for the toggles to mount on. It looks like this:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #17 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 10:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Stringer View Post
Build an exact width dado jig for your router.

And while we are at it, consider the Bosch 1617EVSPK router combo. The fixed base will clamp to your cast iron table on the right side of the new saw. Note: You can't relocate that wing to the left side because the motor housing is in the way, but you will find that out soon enough.

The plunge base can be used for hand held operations. I have two of those kits and at times, the bits stay in the router so I don't have to change 'em out. And I have a Triton mounted under a table. :-)

Good luck. Attached is my drawing for the dado jig. It is based on the jig The Wood Whisperer built and demonstrates in his YouTube video with the exception being the knobs are on top for easy access. It works great. All you need is a 1/2 inch pattern bit to make dados for 3/4 inch material (including 3/4 plywood that is not actually 3/4 inches thick). That is why the jig works so well. You don't have to change blades to a dado stack and try to figure out what shims to add to get the desired width of the dado. With the jig, simply stick you material in the slot, tighten the knobs, and you are ready to route.
Great info! Thank You for your help.
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post #18 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
This straight line rip jig save time over using a jointer to straighten edges:



I needed to straight line many, actually dozens of pieces, so I made a "jig" rather than scab on strips each time, which is way too time consuming for me.... "snap on" then rip and "snap off'"...next piece...
I made two sizes,one long enough for 8 footers and a 54" for shorter boards. I used 1/4" hardboard for the bottom and a 1 X 3" piece of Oak for the toggles to mount on. It looks like this:
Very nice, Thank You. This is a jig I can see being very helpful since I don't own a jointer.
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post #19 of 32 Old 04-05-2017, 11:12 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by allpurpose View Post
If you manage to get a decent table saw spend $65 for a MiterSet jig.. You definitely won't regret it especially if you're making picture frames..
www.miterset.com
It definitely beats those fabulous 45.1853 45 angles..
That's a cool jig. Just ordered it. Thank You for pointing me in that direction.
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post #20 of 32 Old 04-06-2017, 01:27 AM
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Originally Posted by clschaffer View Post
subroc and renraw9002, Thank You both for the input. Gives me something to get started on. renraw9002 I like the looks of your router jig. That's a great idea, and I'm in the same boat as you. My pockets aren't deep enough as of now for a jointer.
Oh that photo is of my circular saw jig lol. Just line up my pencil line with the notch and cut.
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