A Leg Up - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 08-14-2011, 12:20 AM Thread Starter
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post #2 of 7 Old 08-14-2011, 12:48 AM
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Well for crying out loud, I have that same set up on a set of horses so I don't have to lift plywood sheets. That is the first time I have seen them commercial made. That is a neat way for a table saw but if I could lift a sheet of plywood I wouldn't need one of them.

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post #3 of 7 Old 08-14-2011, 06:29 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
Well for crying out loud, I have that same set up on a set of horses so I don't have to lift plywood sheets. That is the first time I have seen them commercial made. That is a neat way for a table saw but if I could lift a sheet of plywood I wouldn't need one of them.
I know exactly what you mean. I can remember just tossing 1 1/8" particle board on the saw all day long. Then 3/4" plywood felt light enough you would think you could do it with one hand.

I've always had a good size table on the left side of the saw. I would just have one hand on the bottom edge of the 96" edge, and then carry it to the table and rock it over and on. With a bad (tricky) back, I found it easier to use a shopmade transporter for a sheet, like this one. Sure beats carrying it.
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Then to get the sheet up on the table, the best five bucks I've ever spent at HF, a panel carrier like this:
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post #4 of 7 Old 08-14-2011, 10:14 AM
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Buddy, if you could handle 1 1/8 inch particle board by yourself you were no wimp, that is for sure. At one time we were dealing with nursing home knock down furniture, which you know is garbage but that was their specs, not ours. Handling the 3/4X5X12 fibercore paper covered sheets was all two men could handle.

I also made a plywood hauler but it is a little different from yours, but on the same principle. I didn't know HF had the carriers, I haven't been there in a good while.

The way I worked my plywood was to store it on edge so all I had to do is pick up one end and roll the hauler under it. I had it so it would free stand if I needed to do something while moving the plywood. On two of my horses I have the swing up arms just like in the video, except made out of wood and door hinges. I would put one end of the plywood in one of the arms and swing the other end off the hauler onto the other arm, lay it over on the horses and cut the plywood down to a size I could handle.

C-Man while posting this I got to thinking back when we were making the nursing home furniture, if anyone could call it that. We were to cut out the knock down furniture ship it out and they would assemble it. It was really garbage and all they wanted it to do is last one year and that is about all it would last. They told me if it didn't tear up they couldn't get the money next year so they wanted it to tear up. Guess who paid for that... I best stop right there or I will really get carried away. Sorry to hi jack your thread Mike.

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Last edited by BigJim; 08-14-2011 at 10:17 AM. Reason: old age
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post #5 of 7 Old 08-14-2011, 04:51 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry to hi jack your thread Mike.
Not a hijack, but a rather interesting story. Anyone using that 1 1/8" PB would appreciate any way in the world to help manage it. I can't count how many toilet partitions I installed with that stuff. Add the glue and mica both sides it gets even heavier.

There was one client some years back that opened a stock brokerage office and needed ASAP, simple desks to fit cubicles. They were 4' long, 2' wide, and desk height. The ends and top were an inverted "U", and in the front of the desk between the ends was a modesty panel (not to the floor). On one side was a simple box with two file drawers.

I had one week to make 28 desks. The money was great. But, when I had the unit of PB delivered, and down behind the table saw, I got thinking how much weight was there that I would be moving around. Then would have been a perfect time for a "Leg Up".

But the story brings back memories of pain. I laid out all the parts and pieces, so that I would maximize material, and get it all out of what I ordered. The process called for cutting all the tops at one saw setting, all the ends at one setting, and likewise for the modesty panel. That entailed handling all the sheets for each cut. It's not as easy as starting with a full sheet, and just cutting all the parts from that one, and then pull up another sheet. So, I can't say how many times sheets got moved around, but by the end of the job, I earned every penny. I think I took a day off after delivery and installation.








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post #6 of 7 Old 08-15-2011, 02:22 AM
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Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
Not a hijack, but a rather interesting story. Anyone using that 1 1/8" PB would appreciate any way in the world to help manage it. I can't count how many toilet partitions I installed with that stuff. Add the glue and mica both sides it gets even heavier.

There was one client some years back that opened a stock brokerage office and needed ASAP, simple desks to fit cubicles. They were 4' long, 2' wide, and desk height. The ends and top were an inverted "U", and in the front of the desk between the ends was a modesty panel (not to the floor). On one side was a simple box with two file drawers.

I had one week to make 28 desks. The money was great. But, when I had the unit of PB delivered, and down behind the table saw, I got thinking how much weight was there that I would be moving around. Then would have been a perfect time for a "Leg Up".

But the story brings back memories of pain. I laid out all the parts and pieces, so that I would maximize material, and get it all out of what I ordered. The process called for cutting all the tops at one saw setting, all the ends at one setting, and likewise for the modesty panel. That entailed handling all the sheets for each cut. It's not as easy as starting with a full sheet, and just cutting all the parts from that one, and then pull up another sheet. So, I can't say how many times sheets got moved around, but by the end of the job, I earned every penny. I think I took a day off after delivery and installation.








.
Good gravy, talk about being under pressure, 28 desks in one week. Handling all that heavy sheet goods and building all the desk to boot. I bet you pulled some mighty long hours that week and wore out wouldn't even come close. I bet you don't miss those days like that.

I did commercial work for a while and never did like it. Mostly building hospital nursing stations and doctor offices and furniture, patient room furniture etc, too much pressure on dead lines. We didn't like all the HPL work either. They would wait until the last minute and tell us they had to have them now. Good money but too much pressure for me. I loved restoring the old antique homes, stair work and wood working. Got my fill of building homes too.

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post #7 of 7 Old 08-15-2011, 05:03 AM
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Simple and functional. Looks easy to make, too.

Harrison, at your service!
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