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post #1 of 19 Old 12-09-2019, 05:46 AM Thread Starter
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Yield?

I've run across some straight cherry logs next to a tree trimmer's burn pile that I'm considering hauling to a sawmill. They are small, under 6' in length and around 16" dia at both ends. The 5 logs range from 40 - 60 BF each. Not a lot. I have limited equipment so the hauling part will be a bit of work for me. So I'm trying to figure what size/amount of 4/4 boards I could reasonable expect.

All is approximate, but could I expect 6-8 boards out of each log?

P.S. What percentage of BF on the average actually ends up as clear usable boards from small dia. logs?
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post #2 of 19 Old 12-11-2019, 10:25 AM
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You would be lucky to get 6, the logs would have to be super straight and the cut would have to line up just right.
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post #3 of 19 Old 12-11-2019, 02:23 PM
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if you own a chainsaw, try cutting them on site


<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8qz64ELkxdA" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
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post #4 of 19 Old 12-11-2019, 06:42 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Water View Post
You would be lucky to get 6, the logs would have to be super straight and the cut would have to line up just right.
Not quite sure you're referring to, but I was thinking more like this:

Yes, this would be more applicable for larger logs than I have, but a simpler pattern is what I'm looking for.
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Last edited by djg; 12-11-2019 at 06:57 PM.
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post #5 of 19 Old 12-11-2019, 06:59 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Ogre View Post
if you own a chainsaw, try cutting them on site

https://youtu.be/8qz64ELkxdA

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8qz64ELkxdA" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
I've tried free-hand sawing and it's not as easy as the guy makes it look. Plus hard to get 4/4 boards.
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post #6 of 19 Old 12-11-2019, 07:24 PM
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well look at it this way. Any board foot of cherry you get out of it is still alot of money saved compare to if you purchase same board foot from a lumber supply.

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post #7 of 19 Old 12-11-2019, 09:09 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mjadams61 View Post
well look at it this way. Any board foot of cherry you get out of it is still alot of money saved compare to if you purchase same board foot from a lumber supply.
That was my same thoughts when I saw these logs on the burn pile.


But then there's the sawyer's cost. I just like to know what to expect. Don't want to end up with $5BF green lumber.
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post #8 of 19 Old 12-12-2019, 09:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djg View Post
I've run across some straight cherry logs next to a tree trimmer's burn pile that I'm considering hauling to a sawmill. They are small, under 6' in length and around 16" dia at both ends. The 5 logs range from 40 - 60 BF each. Not a lot. I have limited equipment so the hauling part will be a bit of work for me. So I'm trying to figure what size/amount of 4/4 boards I could reasonable expect.

All is approximate, but could I expect 6-8 boards out of each log?

P.S. What percentage of BF on the average actually ends up as clear usable boards from small dia. logs?
Quote:
Originally Posted by djg View Post
Not quite sure you're referring to, but I was thinking more like this:

Yes, this would be more applicable for larger logs than I have, but a simpler pattern is what I'm looking for.

I thought the original question was how many 4x4 boards, I misunderstood the question. (4/4 not 4x4, seems obvious now)

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post #9 of 19 Old 12-12-2019, 10:21 AM
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I'll make another attempt at answering. If it were my log, I'd just straight cut as many 4/4 slabs as I could. The only reason I would consider doing anything different is if I was looking for certain grain patterns, like quartersawn or riftsawn. The outermost boards will be narrow and want to deform the most while drying, but otherwise you should be able to get a decent yield ( I don't know what the percentages work out to). Of course the default answer is - it just depends on what you want to do with it. As far as the sawyer's price goes, if you're charged by the hour then straight cutting logs that small should go quick, should be able to get it done in 1 day best case scenario if the sawyer doesn't have to spend a bunch of time moving logs around and stacking boards. I wouldn't charge by the bf in a situation like this but off the top of my head 1-2 $/bf sounds reasonable to me. Just my 2 cents.
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post #10 of 19 Old 12-12-2019, 01:09 PM
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The sawyer will determine the best way to cut.


Two that I deal with will not accept logs from a yard or property due to possible imbedded metal.

Another one makes you agree to pay for a blade if needed.
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post #11 of 19 Old 12-12-2019, 09:39 PM
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If the guy that has the cherry logs is very knowledgeable about trees he would have them cut up already.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #12 of 19 Old 12-12-2019, 10:35 PM
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Keep in mind that a 4/4 is cut a little more than an inch and there is the blade kerf to deal with. Talk with a sawyer about the logs and they will know or suggest how to cut the logs. Some charge by the board foot and some will charge by hour. Rates will depend on your area too. Cherry is bad to split on the pith. This may cull the center board that contains the pith, I assume they would cut with the split parallel to the kerf. As stated earlier if they were yard trees and have metal it could cost you an extra $25 or so if they hit metal and mess up a band.
Once cut you'll need to stack and put stickers between the layers so they can air dry. The sawyer may sell them or cut some from your edge boards, though it is better if they are already cut and dried so this may be extra. Then you may need to kiln dry to get to a moister content to make useable for your furniture projects. Gosh, this sounds discouraging and I don't mean it to be just wanting to share some thoughts that you may not have considered.
Post back once you make a decision.

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post #13 of 19 Old 12-13-2019, 09:54 AM
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assuming you are talking black cherry... fwiw it has a considerable sap wood ring, that may or may not be a detriment for you. but if you are considering (heartwood) yield, you will probable subtract 15-20% for sap.

also, with regards to sawing, quartersawn cherry is not typicaly sought after, like qs oak may be. it presents a more mottled appearance. jmho.
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post #14 of 19 Old 12-14-2019, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrRobert View Post
The sawyer will determine the best way to cut.


Two that I deal with will not accept logs from a yard or property due to possible imbedded metal.

Another one makes you agree to pay for a blade if needed.
Yes, as I said, I'd leave it up to the sawyer. I've dealt with another sawyer (retired) before and I know about yard trees.
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post #15 of 19 Old 12-14-2019, 07:39 AM Thread Starter
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If the guy that has the cherry logs is very knowledgeable about trees he would have them cut up already.
The guy is a tree trimmer. He makes his living taking trees down, not cutting them up.
You should have seen the three R. Oak logs he burned up: 24-30" dia x 12' long; straight.
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post #16 of 19 Old 12-14-2019, 07:41 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
assuming you are talking black cherry... fwiw it has a considerable sap wood ring, that may or may not be a detriment for you. but if you are considering (heartwood) yield, you will probable subtract 15-20% for sap.

also, with regards to sawing, quartersawn cherry is not typicaly sought after, like qs oak may be. it presents a more mottled appearance. jmho.
Thanks, I forgot about the sapwood. It's not visible now, but I know what you mean. QS? I never mentioned that; that's not what I want.
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post #17 of 19 Old 12-14-2019, 07:48 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by samandothers View Post
Keep in mind that a 4/4 is cut a little more than an inch and there is the blade kerf to deal with. Talk with a sawyer about the logs and they will know or suggest how to cut the logs. Some charge by the board foot and some will charge by hour. Rates will depend on your area too. Cherry is bad to split on the pith. This may cull the center board that contains the pith, I assume they would cut with the split parallel to the kerf. As stated earlier if they were yard trees and have metal it could cost you an extra $25 or so if they hit metal and mess up a band.
Once cut you'll need to stack and put stickers between the layers so they can air dry. The sawyer may sell them or cut some from your edge boards, though it is better if they are already cut and dried so this may be extra. Then you may need to kiln dry to get to a moister content to make useable for your furniture projects. Gosh, this sounds discouraging and I don't mean it to be just wanting to share some thoughts that you may not have considered.
Post back once you make a decision.
Discouraging, yes. That's why I'm trying to figure cost and labor ahead of time. I have a guy who will pay me $75 a load for BBQ smoking wood for my trailer full, so that's something else to consider.
I've stickered hundreds of BF while I did a stint at a circle mill, so this is not knew to me. If anyone knew all the steps and labor that go into making lumber, they wouldn't complain about the purchasing price.
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post #18 of 19 Old 12-14-2019, 07:58 AM Thread Starter
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To make matters worse everyone, some yahoo came in and cut a firewood log off one of the 18" dia 6 foot logs. Thought I was the only one who had permission to cut. He took just one firewood length, probably found it was too heavy for him to lift, and stopped. Ruined the log. Now I'm down to 4'-6" log. Pretty much useless now. After end checking during drying, I'd end up with a little over 3' of useable boards. I'll haul it home and break it down with a chainsaw and the mill 6" boards on my band saw.


But now the log count going to the mill is probably only three. One on the bottom isn't as straight as I thought.
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post #19 of 19 Old 12-14-2019, 07:00 PM
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Sorry to hear your log count dropped.
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