Redwood Slab Drying Question - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 08-03-2010, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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Redwood Slab Drying Question

I got lucky enough to get a Old Growth Redwood Slab for a kitchen island. The entire slab is about 15 feet long, I need about 12 feet for our island. It is about 3 1/4 inches thick. I measured the moisture at the surface with my meters short pins and it is 16-17%. I sealed the ends with Anchor Seal.

It has a crack in the end a little over 2 feet into it, which has not grown since I got it 3 weeks ago. My concern is the crack spreading farther into the slab. Being new to slab lumber and drying it I am wondering if there is anything I can do to stop the crack from going deeper into it.

I purchased Daren's plans for a dehumidifying kiln and almost ready to start building it. I am making the kiln just for this slab and a smaller slab I got with it. It will be in my garage. I am would be grateful for any tips from all of you with experience drying slab lumber especially anybody with redwood drying experience.

The dinner plates in the pictures were for a size reference for some friends who are dimensionally challenged.

Thanks in Advance!
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post #2 of 7 Old 08-03-2010, 10:56 PM
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Maybe put a bowtie joint or two into the crack. Check Daren's posts ... he shows some nifty use of bowties. With the bowtie, it won't matter if the crack goes in a little further, just add another bowtie ... they look neat.

I guess you'll also want to fill the crack since if you aren't using a tablecloth with this, you won't want food to be able to get lodged in the crack.

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post #3 of 7 Old 08-03-2010, 11:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redwood Jim View Post
I got lucky enough to get a Old Growth Redwood Slab for a kitchen island. The entire slab is about 15 feet long, I need about 12 feet for our island. It is about 3 1/4 inches thick. I measured the moisture at the surface with my meters short pins and it is 16-17%. I sealed the ends with Anchor Seal.

It has a crack in the end a little over 2 feet into it, which has not grown since I got it 3 weeks ago. My concern is the crack spreading farther into the slab. Being new to slab lumber and drying it I am wondering if there is anything I can do to stop the crack from going deeper into it.

I purchased Daren's plans for a dehumidifying kiln and almost ready to start building it. I am making the kiln just for this slab and a smaller slab I got with it. It will be in my garage. I am would be grateful for any tips from all of you with experience drying slab lumber especially anybody with redwood drying experience.

The dinner plates in the pictures were for a size reference for some friends who are dimensionally challenged.

Thanks in Advance!
Put a a bowtie joint on the bottom side if you dont want to see it ? Like phinds said . Maybe when you do this any way to clamp or draw it togother ?? Their may not be any give to this ? Than put the a bowtie joint in ?
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post #4 of 7 Old 08-04-2010, 12:00 AM
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Once a check occurs it's from internal stress and you can't stop it once it starts u either slice it down the crack to relieve it or cut the crack off and reseal it. You can also leave it alone and hope it stops it does reach a stopping point hope this helped and that cowrie sounds real nice it would give nice character to that peice
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post #5 of 7 Old 08-04-2010, 09:07 AM
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At 16%-17% I don't expect it to crack much more. I will pretty much say "ditto" to what Ibangwood just typed. Adding if you are going to cut the end off anyway you could screw a board to the end (endgrain) to keep the crack from spreading, should it decide to, while you finish drying the piece. And what everyone else said, bowtie the crack would be the way I would do it...But that looks like a nice straight crack and could be sawn (ripped) along it and glued back together and probably never even noticed if you don't like the looks of bowties.


Here is a thread that may interest you if you do decide to do bow ties (butterflies, dutchmen) http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/bu...t-boards-7263/






.

Last edited by Daren; 08-04-2010 at 09:11 AM.
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post #6 of 7 Old 01-14-2014, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Daren View Post
At 16%-17% I don't expect it to crack much more. I will pretty much say "ditto" to what Ibangwood just typed. Adding if you are going to cut the end off anyway you could screw a board to the end (endgrain) to keep the crack from spreading, should it decide to, while you finish drying the piece. And what everyone else said, bowtie the crack would be the way I would do it...But that looks like a nice straight crack and could be sawn (ripped) along it and glued back together and probably never even noticed if you don't like the looks of bowties.
.
Bowties can look unbelievably good. We've had a few customers take home some of our redwood slabs and bowtie them with walnut and White Oak. Here are the White Oak bowties. The contrast they create in the finished surface is very attractive: http://www.longleaflumber.com/reside...redwood-table/

Here is a blog post we did on another redwood slab table one of our customers finished. He used walnut bowties: http://www.longleaflumber.com/redwood-slab-table/

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post #7 of 7 Old 01-14-2014, 03:06 PM
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I would try a ratchet strap or two keep it from spreading.
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