kiln drying pine slab? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 44 Old 11-14-2014, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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Oh from what I read online some is epoxy and some isn't. But ya I will research it more. Not sure how I feel about using epoxy.
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post #22 of 44 Old 11-17-2014, 01:52 PM
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Glad you found someone to kiln dry your slab. That will set the pitch and sterilize the wood in case there are any eggs or larvae inside that could hatch out and emerge later. A solar kiln will not stay hot enough for long enough to sterilize even 4/4 lumber, much less a slab.

Mine will reach 150 degrees+ in the summer when the sun is high but that optimum time doesn't last long. The lumber needs to reach 132 degree throughout the plank and remain there for at least four hours. I doubt a slab would ever reach that temperature at the core in a solar kiln, much less maintain it for four hours. If the kiln could rotate and track the sun, then it would probably stay hot long enough but that would be an expensive feature.

No harm in sealing the ends of the slab but it's not necessary on Pine. The sap is self-sealing. Sealed or left unsealed, however, there will be some checking on the end grain. That's a good reason to dry the entire slab and then any checking can be cut off. You will also have the entire slab available to select the best looking area for the 7' section you need.

I think that epoxy bar-top finish at Home Depot is ideal for a bar top. It will protect the wood from scratches, etc. but it will also greatly inhibit moisture exchange so the wood won't move much, if any, from seasonal humidity swings.
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post #23 of 44 Old 11-17-2014, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
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So, the guy who is drying my slab is actually going to trade me for a already dry one. I took all the bark off and am going to start sanding. On the sides where the bark is what grit should I use? For the top and bottom should I start with 80 grit?
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post #24 of 44 Old 11-17-2014, 05:34 PM
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Got pix's?
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post #25 of 44 Old 11-17-2014, 07:30 PM
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Grit depends on a few factors.....how hard the wood is....how rough it is....how much character do you want left....was it bandsawed or circle sawn.....

1) Let's start with whether band or circle sawn....Bands are usually flatter and more uniform throughout AND requires less sanding....circle sawn usually have one or more teeth out of set (this happens also with bands) and are a little coarser in texture.
I prefer a truer rustic and I WANT my saw marks to show some/more...and with my saw setup I normally will sand at 120 grit first to see what removes and what doesn't...IF I'm satisfied with that texture I read on my finish chosen to see what final grit I work up to. 120 will be the bottom end of required finishing grits. I've used finishes that wanted max of 120 and others wanted 220 and up.
I have had to use as coarse as 24 (NOT on pine) to grind deviations into my plan and then work up.

2) How much character....basically same as above

3) How hard the wood is AND what tools/sanders you plan on using...BUT with pine and unless changing the shape much 80 is going to be the coursest and use a palm/orbital/vibrating type sander...I use a large disc grinder IF grinding edges and corners but palm size sanders for all finishing.

OH YEAH....PLEASE post pics as you go through the steps...we LOVE to see wood being worked...I mean caressed .

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.

Last edited by Tennessee Tim; 11-17-2014 at 07:33 PM.
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post #26 of 44 Old 11-17-2014, 10:43 PM Thread Starter
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Yes pictures! I only have a few with the bark on, but I will get those posted. I took the bark off yesterday and will get pictures tomorrow or Wednesday. Wanted to get out there today but got called into work early. I'm super excited to start sanding. I think it was cut with a bandsaw. This slab is thicker, I'm shocked the guy traded with me. But then again he had so many slabs I don't think he really cared. But I will get pictures uploaded to computer and posted in a minute ☺
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post #27 of 44 Old 11-17-2014, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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Not the best pictures but you get the idea.
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post #28 of 44 Old 11-18-2014, 12:09 PM Thread Starter
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I forgot to post last night I will be using an orbital palm sander.
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post #29 of 44 Old 11-21-2014, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
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Without the bark, I want to sand down some of the imperfections but I'm not sure what grit to use. Any suggestions?
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post #30 of 44 Old 11-22-2014, 03:05 AM
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I always start out wit 40 grit and work finer as I go.
I don't have access to a planer which takes most of the roughness off and levels the surface so I use a 9" grinder to quickly flatten and smooth the top. Next I go to a palm sander with 80 grit and work it down to 120 or 220 grit.
Pine sands easy.
As this looks now, you have what is called a "live edged" slab. Basically if you want to save that bark off look and color, use a palm sander and 120 grit to take the sides down to where you like the color and patterning.

You first, before you start , need to know the moisture content. It needs to be in the 10% range before you start with any seal coats. The only way to check this semi-accurately is to nip off an end of the log and check it for "internal" moisture content.
You can buy a cheap moisture meter at Lowes for under $40.oo


Good luck.

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post #31 of 44 Old 11-23-2014, 12:44 AM Thread Starter
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Okay so I sanded the top and sides down I used 120 grit for the sides and started 80 grit for top. Ran 120 once over the top. Will post pictures in a minute. This slab is 12 feet long, I will be cutting it down to 7 feet soon. So I will check moisture content at that time.
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post #32 of 44 Old 11-23-2014, 12:49 AM Thread Starter
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As you can see I still have a lot of work to do. I love seeing the saw marks but would like to see more grain. Do I need to sand more with 80 grit? I like how the sides are looking, I will get better pictures of the sides tomorrow.
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post #33 of 44 Old 11-23-2014, 12:55 AM Thread Starter
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This is going to be the top side of the bar. I would like to be able to see more grain. Tge under side looks awesome... but thats the under side. Its to narrow for a nice bar top.Name:  1416722011361.jpg
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post #34 of 44 Old 11-23-2014, 02:17 AM
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If you want to see more grain, you'll have to cut down more with (say) 36-40 grit, and remove the sawcut marks.
Some like to see the sawcut marks. I do on certain pieces, but if you don't cut into them it will subdue the visual effect of the grains.
It's a trade off. You can leave some in for effect.

If you have some lacquer thinner or mineral spirits, you can dampen the surface to see what it will look like finished.. It will evaporate off kind of fast. You can use water, but use it sparingly. This will give you an indication of what the top will look like with a clear coat on it.
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post #35 of 44 Old 01-17-2015, 11:09 AM
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Hi samantha, I just reat your post about the pine slab and it reminded me of a project I am working on. My slabs are still drying in my kiln but I am working on a natural edge white pine slab dining room table. I see that there have not been any posts in a while and was wondering how the project is coming along?
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post #36 of 44 Old 01-20-2015, 12:44 PM Thread Starter
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The pine slab is completely sanded, cut to size and ready to epoxy, but I'm nervous to epoxy it lol I have a friend who is going to help me but they currently have no room in their shop for my slab so that project is at a stand still. However the rest of the bar is complete minus some trim work that i have to cut yet. I will post pictures later today.
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post #37 of 44 Old 01-21-2015, 01:17 AM
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Cant wait to see final pix's.
You'll be impressed with the epoxy. It's mostly what I use.
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post #38 of 44 Old 01-21-2015, 01:22 AM Thread Starter
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So this is the base of the bar. Looks.great, now I just gotta get the top down.
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post #39 of 44 Old 01-21-2015, 01:24 AM Thread Starter
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In the second picture the is the part sticking out that will be for the foot rest. That will be epoxied when I do the top
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post #40 of 44 Old 01-22-2015, 01:34 AM
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Cool!
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