drying hickory - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 Old 04-17-2009, 09:25 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Rick C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Eastern Ozarks
Posts: 468
View Rick C.'s Photo Album My Photos
drying hickory

I'm having hickory cut into 2 1/2 in slabs.Would stacking and drying these be any different than 5/4 oak or maple.Will it move alot?Should I let it air dry or put it right in the kiln?I plan on making a butcher block counter top and work bench from it and never worked with hickory before. Thanks, Rick
Rick C. is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 04-17-2009, 09:47 AM
Forgotten but not gone
 
TexasTimbers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,677
View TexasTimbers's Photo Album My Photos
What kind of hickory?

The only hickory I have worked with is Pecan. It likes to move A LOT. Consider qtr sawing it and weighing it down as much as you can. It is prone to sticker stain if the stickers are of a different MC% than the wood. The faster you dry it the better. Bugs love the wood and especially the sap.

Hickory is beautiful. I have heard that shagbark hickory has a dark heartwood and light sapwood compared to other hickories.

About drying 10/4 flitches in a kiln, I have never dried anything that thick except turning blocks, and since they are as short as they are, that's a different ballgame than what you're aiming for. Daren may have experience with stuff that thick. If you're planning on drying them in a the DH kiln you're gonna build (or have built) i doubt you can ruin them, but do not know how long something that thick would take.

I cut my Pecan logs on 5/4 for the most part, and when I see good crotch figure which is usually, I cut some 3" thick flitches too. 5/4 because most will warp and twist a lot, and 3" because most will war and twist a lot.

I don't know how relevant my Pecan experience is to one of the four true hickories, but I would guess pretty close. the 4 true hickories and the 4 Pecan hickories are two seperate species, but in the same genus. I think I have that right.

Last edited by TexasTimbers; 04-17-2009 at 09:49 AM.
TexasTimbers is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 04-17-2009, 10:50 AM
Senior Member
 
jeffreythree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cross Roads, Tx
Posts: 711
View jeffreythree's Photo Album My Photos
Make sure the ends are sealed REAL good. For some reason the hickory I have dried liked to check real bad on the endswhen not sealed good, almost to the point of splitting the board in two.

"Say hello to my little friend" Macie Clark, Christmas 2010

http://texaswoodlot.blogspot.com
jeffreythree is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 Old 04-17-2009, 11:27 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Rick C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Eastern Ozarks
Posts: 468
View Rick C.'s Photo Album My Photos
T.T.,I don't know for sure which hickory it is,I do it isn't pecan,shag bark or pignut.The wood is very light almost all the way through.Logs are +-24in.I do have a dh kiln.Pecan sure is perty wood tho.Jeffrey three,I did seal the ends .If the board splits I shouldn't have to rip it riiightThanks Rick
Rick C. is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 04-18-2009, 11:24 AM
Forgotten but not gone
 
TexasTimbers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,677
View TexasTimbers's Photo Album My Photos
If you're sure it isn't one of those then it has to be Mockernut or Shellbark Hickory. Bitternut Hickory is the most common species of hickory especially in your area but it is a Pecan Hickory and you're sure it isn't Pecan. The book says that Shellbark Hickory has the largest nuts. Did you get to see any?

If it's important to you (it is to us because inquiring minds haff to know!) send me an end grain shaving about 1/8" thick and I'll put the loupe to it and try to determine which exact species you have.
TexasTimbers is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 04-19-2009, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Rick C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Eastern Ozarks
Posts: 468
View Rick C.'s Photo Album My Photos
T.T.,You're right, bitter nut and pig nut are common here.Fortunately I got this from a couple hundred miles north east from here.The nuts around this tree were larger than I see down here.Aren't pecan nuts all oblong?Never heard of mockernut,That doesn't mean anything though.Could be shellbark.I'll send a chunk when it gets cut. Thanks again, Rick
Rick C. is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 04-19-2009, 11:09 AM
Forgotten but not gone
 
TexasTimbers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,677
View TexasTimbers's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick C. View Post
Aren't pecan nuts all oblong?
Not all of them. We have 2 species down here that are more orbish than
oblong. But they are both small nuts.

Mockernut
Name:  Mockernut.jpg
Views: 922
Size:  70.7 KB

Mockernut
Name:  Mockernut2.jpg
Views: 754
Size:  95.0 KB



Bitternut
Name:  Bitternut.jpg
Views: 821
Size:  43.3 KB



Shellbark
Name:  Shellbark.jpg
Views: 795
Size:  93.0 KB


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick C. View Post
I'll send a chunk when it gets cut.
You don't have to wait to get it cut. I just need a very small end grain sample. You can use a utility razor or something razor sharp and slice off a shaving of at least a square inch or two and that's all I need. Something you could slip into an envelope even. I have collected hundreds of different species. I have samples of all the hickories and pecan hickories. Then I look at your sample through a 16x loupe and compare it to my samples. It's harder than it sounds to identify wood this way but I'm getting better at it, and I could use the practice. My wife is better at it than me but I always try first. If I can't decide i hand it over to her and between us we usually "crack the case". Elementary my dear Watson.
TexasTimbers is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 04-19-2009, 07:18 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Rick C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Eastern Ozarks
Posts: 468
View Rick C.'s Photo Album My Photos
T.T.,Once again I learn something every day.Never heard of this,too cool.I'll get a slice to you asap.Is a little end wax on it ok?By the way do you have any sealer yet? When you get some let us know!!!I'm thinking shellbark by the pics of nuts.Thanks, Rick
Rick C. is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 04-19-2009, 07:28 PM
Forgotten but not gone
 
TexasTimbers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,677
View TexasTimbers's Photo Album My Photos
Rick, no wax! I won't be able to see the grain. Or I should say Mrs. TT won't be able to see the grain pattern. haha.

Man I have to confess You wax is still sitting here. I totally forgot about it. It is boxed up though so it'll go out tomorrow. I'll print your label right this minute . . . . . . .
TexasTimbers is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 04-19-2009, 11:23 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Rick C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Eastern Ozarks
Posts: 468
View Rick C.'s Photo Album My Photos
T.T.,do you just want a piece off the side of the trunk,will a slice from where a limb was work?I wasn't sweatin the wax I wanted to know about gallon or so.No rush I'm covered for right now.Did you start this method of id.on your own?Do you use your own pics or a book.The mrs. and I have started a file of different woods w/ different stains to help people choose what they want.Being able to tell what kind of tree their piece came from may intrest some.Thanks,Rick
Rick C. is offline  
post #11 of 11 Old 04-20-2009, 09:03 AM
Forgotten but not gone
 
TexasTimbers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,677
View TexasTimbers's Photo Album My Photos
Rick,

No I am not smart enough to have come up with this.

End grain I.D. has been around a while. The wood cells of end grain all form different characteristics in each specie. It's like a fingerprint, no two species are alike. It is very difficult to become adept at.

What makes it easier is having a pretty good idea what the specie may be, such as in our case. Using bark, leaves, and other such info can help a great deal, but you don't always have a leaf, or a fruit, etc.

The sample is easiest collected from the end of the log. Whatever the method you use to get it, the sample must have, or must be able to produce, a "slice" of end grain, like a piece of glass. Not as in the end grain fibers were "torn" apart as with a chainsaw cut.

You don't have to worry about collecting it so finicky though. Just get me a thin chunk and I can extract a shaving that'll have cleanly sliced cells.

I do use photos from various university websites etc. when i do not have an actual piece of sample wood. Over the past 3ish years we have purchased wood sample kits from various sources which are assembled for this very purpose. Of course we have also made our own from our on local species and also wood we have traded for.

Rick, you should get your hands on a book called Understanding Wood, by Bruce Hoadley. Make sure it's the latest edition I believe there are two. Mine says volume II. We use his Wood Identification book as part of our I.D. library, but everyone who is first becoming interested in using wood at any level or phase of processing, will benefit greatly from reading it, and going back to it again and again for reference.

It will open your eyes to the complexities of understanding the biology of trees, and how and why wood acts and reacts the way it does. If you can also get his Wodd Identification book do so, but if the budget is only set for one right now, get Understanding Wood first.

I can gather a list of sources for you where you can purchase end grain samples whenver you get to that point. Warning: it is not cheap nor easy.
TexasTimbers is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hickory ????? clarionflyer Forestry & Milling 9 01-12-2010 11:30 AM
Waterproofing Hickory? dokuhaku Wood Finishing 5 11-16-2008 09:25 AM
Hickory clarionflyer Forestry & Milling 12 10-29-2008 08:43 PM
drying slab cut off of hickory log for end grain cutting board sadams General Woodworking Discussion 1 03-03-2008 04:03 PM
Hickory was used jpw23 Off Topic 5 04-29-2007 02:37 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome