Chainsaw mills.... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 34 Old 08-09-2010, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
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Chainsaw mills....

This has probably been discussed already so I'm sorrry about that.
I'm looking into purchasing one of those chainsaw mills to do work at my mountain cabin. I've looked at the Alaskan brand. The small mill would work but I'm concerned about the stability of it since it's not attached to the bar in two places like the Mark III. Anyone have any experience with one of these "small mills?" Thanks.
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post #2 of 34 Old 08-09-2010, 03:32 PM
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Hey Old Timer. I don't have any experience with any of them I just wanted to welcome you to the forum.

We have quite a few members here who do have various brands of CSMs though, and I bet you'll get a good number of replies.

Just curious what general area are you located?





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post #3 of 34 Old 08-09-2010, 07:24 PM
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I have an alaskan 24" model. It does attatch to the bar in 2 places. Clamps on accually. I bought it new with the intentions of buying a bigger saw then my 18" and had some major shop tool failures so its on the back burner for now. I fit my lil husky in it to check things out and I only end up with about 11" of useable bar. No I havnt used it at all but I am a mechanic by trade and it seems well built to me. Accually I would be inclined to sell it. I bought it to get live edge peices to work with but have found a draw knife makes my edge just fine...lol
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post #4 of 34 Old 08-10-2010, 08:45 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Texas, I'm located in Va. Thanks for the info Sky. Just looking at the small mill design, it looks like you would have some variation in the thickness with the saw able to move up and down a bit.
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post #5 of 34 Old 08-10-2010, 02:30 PM
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The saw does move up and down on the Alaskan but it also locks in place. Its a very well thought out design.
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post #6 of 34 Old 08-10-2010, 05:23 PM Thread Starter
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Sky, you have the one that attaches in two places. How about the "small mill" that only attaches close to the powerhead of the chain saw? Have any input on that one?
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post #7 of 34 Old 08-10-2010, 06:52 PM
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Owe you must be talking about something like the beam machine. Nope never had one but thought a lot about getting one to complement my Alaskan. Can use one of those to square a log and then slab it up with the Alaskan. Would be easier that way IMO then going thru all the set up for that first cut and then the edges would be easier to square up to.
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post #8 of 34 Old 08-10-2010, 07:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skymonkey View Post
Oh, you must be talking about something like the beam machine.
No, I think he's talking about the Small Log Mill which is shown with a Plexiglas guard and attaches to only one end of the saw. I don't have any experience with one, but have been watching this thread to learn about them.
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post #9 of 34 Old 08-11-2010, 09:03 AM Thread Starter
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That's exactly what I'm referring to. I'm hoping someone reading this thread can reply.
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post #10 of 34 Old 08-11-2010, 09:28 AM
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Like TT said many of the members have used/do use a chainsaw mill...they must be busy and not replying. I used the search box at the top of the page and typed in "chainsaw mill" and came up with dozens of threads on them...granted they don't answer your specific question about "which brand", but I think reading through the old threads will give you some other things to ponder. I will link just a few:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/t...uilding-18020/
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/c...w-mills-16218/
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/chainsaw-mill-10813/
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/a...aw-mill-12023/
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/all-csms-slow-10450/




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post #11 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 09:35 AM
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Old Timer.
I found a little something that may answer your questions. See the "Granberg G777 Mill" thread for my post.
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post #12 of 34 Old 08-12-2010, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks dig, that's the information I was looking for.
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post #13 of 34 Old 08-13-2010, 02:05 PM
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Grandberg Alaskan mill

I use this mill and like it alot. It's the best investment i've ever made. It was payed off the first time i used it.My avatar shows what it can do. I've made lots of lumber with mine.
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post #14 of 34 Old 08-13-2010, 04:26 PM
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I use this mill and like it alot. It's the best investment i've ever made.
But yours attaches at both ends of the saw bar, right? I think what Old Timer (and me) were considering is the Granberg mill that attaches only at one end. I think, from what I've read, the general conclusion is to spend a little more and get a more accurate mill (Mark III).
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post #15 of 34 Old 08-14-2010, 10:33 AM
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mill

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But yours attaches at both ends of the saw bar, right? I think what Old Timer (and me) were considering is the Granberg mill that attaches only at one end. I think, from what I've read, the general conclusion is to spend a little more and get a more accurate mill (Mark III).
For the difference in price, i would get the one that attaches at both ends for better stability and safety. I do have both an they both work well as long as the bar and chain is kept up.I sharpen my chain after about 4 hours of milling on average depending on the tree and dryness of it.
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post #16 of 34 Old 08-14-2010, 11:49 AM
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How do you sharpen it? Do you take the chain completely off the bar or sharpen it in place? Do you just use a handfile, or do you have some kind of apparatus?

I guess based on your recommendation and experience, I'll go for the alaska mill G776. Can't go wrong opting for stability and safety.
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post #17 of 34 Old 08-14-2010, 03:01 PM
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sharpening

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Originally Posted by beelzerob View Post
How do you sharpen it? Do you take the chain completely off the bar or sharpen it in place? Do you just use a handfile, or do you have some kind of apparatus?

I guess based on your recommendation and experience, I'll go for the alaska mill G776. Can't go wrong opting for stability and safety.
I sharpen by hand with a file on the mill.
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post #18 of 34 Old 08-14-2010, 03:56 PM
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Ok, that's good to know. If you had to remove the chain and do quite a lot of work to resharpen, then that would be quite a drag on "productivity".
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post #19 of 34 Old 08-25-2010, 02:31 PM
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I use a dremel and the right sized grinding stone. I will say Stihl makes the best stones and are worth the money. I have sharpened miles of chain on my mill. I have an electric with hydraulic feed mill that I built. My chain mill has a 7 foot bar so let me tell you I have really sharpened some chain. I mill claro and english walnut for gunstocks and table tops so having a wide, clean and accurate cut is important to me. When milling logs expect to hit all kinds of goodies. I typically touch up the chain when the chips start getting short. If I hit a nail or two the dremel will do the job but anything worse and it's quicker to put a new loop of chain on. I fix my really bad chains on a reversible grinder to ensure a good grind and even teeth. I use full skip chisel point 3/8" 404 so this cuts down on the number of cutters to sharpen and works well for milling. The most important thing to remember is to keep your cutters all the same size when using the dremel or risk getting a chain that pulls in one direction or the other. I have found that a flatter angle on the top of the cutter works best for end grain be sure to grind the gullet when sharpening. Hope this helps. :-) Ah, the smell of Marbel Cake English Walnut saw dust in the morning......
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post #20 of 34 Old 08-25-2010, 02:39 PM
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Welcome to the millyard B&M.

Post some pictures! Especially the milling a big Claro. It'll make some of us jealous that we don't have it in our region but we'll get over it.




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