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post #21 of 25 Old 12-27-2008, 06:02 PM
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What I can't figure out is how to figure out a spherical foot.

Pie are squared?

No Gomer, pie are round, cornbread are square.
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post #22 of 25 Old 12-27-2008, 06:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ironhead View Post
Hey TT would it be too much to ask you to post a copy of that cedar scale in your pocket?

Got a guy that is willing to sell me standing cedar for a buck a board foot. Is this a good price? Believe it's Eastern Red but not sure. It's what ever grows like mad in western KY.
I agree with the others. I wouldn't pay for standing cedar. Unless it was exceptional quality and a one-time need or they would have to give it to me for next to nothing. A good straight 20' x 9" small end cedar may be just the ticket for replacing a rotted pole in a barn. I might be willing to pay a .25-50/bf for it, then mill it into a 6x6 and sell it for $1-1.50/bf. (20'er are rare.) But that's a rare need. If they want me to clear it from their land I might have to charge them for it. But good stands I might pay .10-.20/bf. But I never buy logs so my buying advice is suspect.

Daren's advice on rot and deep flutes is very good. They can make a big log yield next to nothing. The flute problem is usually concentrated in the first few feet of the log but can run its whole length or skip and show up futher up. Sometimes you can cut above it and sometimes you can still mill some lumber out in a fluted log.

I've noticed lately a few cedar logs that have a punky ring around the heart. It ran from top to bottom. Good situation for a reject. But more commonly is red rot. This will appear hard but blocky to almost sawdust. It appears most often in the biggest of logs. Another type of reject.

I've cut a good bit of cedar over the years. I did'nt use the push-button veg-o-matic machines TT has. Just the old-fashioned methods. There's just a few things that stand out about felling cedar. It usually grows dense so felling the first trees into an opening can be impractical. So the first/second/third trees simply lean over and hang up. When I was younger I used the "lift the butt and run" method for clearing the snags. This only worked on the smaller trees. Nowadays a tractor assist in this process. I call cedar the tree of 1000 limbs because by the time you clear them all off a tree that's how many it felt like. Then you roll it over only to find you missed a dozen or more on the bottom side. Finally, cedar limbs have a talent for snagging the chain right off your saw. Keep 'er tight.

I do like cedar though. Mill them quick to preserve the whiteness of the sapwood and its contrast to the heartwood.
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post #23 of 25 Old 12-28-2008, 04:07 PM
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I've cut a good bit of cedar over the years. I did'nt use the push-button veg-o-matic machines TT has. Just the old-fashioned methods.
Hey one thing I can tell you, when I log cedar I sure don't feel like I have any log-o-matic machinery.

I also milled with a manual mill for the first 3 years too. I did my share of nut-busting I promise you, and as anyone with a hydraulic mill will tell you, there are times you still have to get down in the trenches and do battle with a stubborn log.

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There's just a few things that stand out about felling cedar. . . . the first/second/third trees simply lean over and hang up.
You haven't lived until you log in a thicket of Bois D' Arc all clumped together. You can forget about "felling". In fact when I go to log any I tell my wife "Honey I am going to go lean some bodark."

Where I get it, they grow so close together and are so thick, you have to start on the outside and work your way in to ones you want, so you have to fell ones you don't want. Trying to take down a big bodark in the middle of the thicket is highly impractical and certainly dangerous.

On the cedar, it's much the same way but even big wet cedar is so light compared to big hardwood that the skidsteer will drag/push the butt with ease. On a big bodark that's hung up, I don't even consider using the skidsteer. You get caught on the tree and it will throw the little 6500 pound skidsteer like it's a toy Tonka truck.

clod that is good advice you gave though. I can relate to finding the limbs on the bottom. A tip that will make it easier on you. Do you limb as far up as you can reach first? I do. I know you aren't suppose to use a saw above chest high but I limb as far up the tree as my blade will reach. Saves a whole lot of work. Especially if you use a 28" bar for that part, you can limb a good portion of the sawlog itself, drop the tree, grab the limbing saw and when you are done the log will roll over much easier because you got the big heavy limbs off before you even dropped the tree. I do not use this method on hardwood trees too dangerous. Cedar is a piece of cake though usually.
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post #24 of 25 Old 01-05-2009, 02:04 PM
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I agree with dirtclod. I cut down cedars on a lot we owned and I had to cut 3 trees to get the first one to fall.

I don't plan my day in advance cause the word "Premeditated" ends up flying around the court room.......
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post #25 of 25 Old 01-05-2009, 03:04 PM
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You can always use those small cedar for something too. Corner and fence posts. Log furniture. If you have a lathe, the time, and the inclination you can turn everything from paper towel holders to spindles.
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