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post #1 of 7 Old 04-02-2011, 05:32 PM Thread Starter
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I would like to share with you guy's my experience using the SawStop table saw.

My school woodshop has the Sawstop in it to prevent kids from making mistakes. I think it is good to have in a school environment where kids are still learning the basics of a table saw, and so they have a little less to worry about.
My issues with the saw.
I think kids tend to get a little lackadaisical when it comes to the table saw now, because they think, "Well it won't cut my fingers off, i'll be fine". What if it malfunctions? What if a kick back? I think that it just makes them lass aware of the still existing dangers of the Table saw. I think that this saw is not engineered as well as a Delta, Powermatic, or a Jet. It just seems like it wasn't drawn up very well, and could use revisions to make it seem like it's more heavy duty like the Delta, or Powermatic saws. It seems that the dust collection on this saw stinks. It seems like after one hour of use, it needs to be cleaned out. I know we are using it in a school and it's being used a lot, but for the amount that it collects, and the amount that ends up on the table, or on the user, it doesn't do a very good job, as it claims. All in all, I dislike the table saw, for price, quality, and dust collection. I do know that fingers cost more than the difference between Sawstop and your average saw, but to me, if you're careful and aware about what can happen behind a tablesaw, you shouldn't have an accident.

What I like about the saw.
The saw is safe, it does prevent you from cutting any part of your body off from what the company says. It has a nice heavy duty cast iron table, and easy to use t square style fence. It is just a little bit more insurance that kids in a schooling environment will not have an accident on the saw pertaining to cutting them selves.

All in all, the sawstop is a good investment for a school or multi-person shop environment in my opinion. For a home shop, or small business, I don't think I would invest in one. Like I said earlier, If you are careful, use the right push sticks, and techniques when you're behind the saw, you shouldn't have an accident. It's just second nature using a table saw no a day's. Keeping your fingers clear of the blade, and using push sticks when necessary.
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post #2 of 7 Old 04-02-2011, 06:19 PM
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Locodcdude I will only say that after 20 years experience safely using a table saw, It only takes one time and one second even with pushsticks and such. If anyone uses a SawStop and thinks they don't need to respect the saw there crazy and deserve what they get.
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post #3 of 7 Old 04-02-2011, 07:30 PM
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Well, I don't see any reason you need to inform them that the saw will do what it does. Just tell them that it is a normal saw and it is very dangerous and to treat it as such. If someone does slip, the fact that they don't know that it will retract won't make a difference, the saw will do it's job. If they think it can hurt them it will keep them on their toes more so than if they know they can't really get hurt bad.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
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post #4 of 7 Old 04-02-2011, 11:05 PM Thread Starter
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I do know that accidents can happen, and thousands of people experience them every year. It's sad to see a woodworker have to hang up their apron because they have lost fingers or hands because of a table saw. All I'm saying here is that because it has the name behind it, kids tend to thing that nothing can go wrong with it, so they tend to relax more when they are operating it. Kick back can still happen, and the saw can still malfunction.
I AM NOT PERSUADING ANYONE BY SAYING THE FOLLOWING
Same thing with blade guards, Personally I don't use one on my saw, because I like to be able to see where exactly my fingers are around the blade. If the blade guard is there, I feel like I am closer to the blade than I might actually be. Plus if the guard is on my saw, will it actually protect me that much more? If I slip the guard isn't going to stop my fingers from going it, it will allow them to pass through it just as easy as if they we're pieces of wood. Which there again, to each his own. I just like being able to see everything where it's at, and knowing that I'm safe, rather than "guessing" if i'm close to the blade or not. If you don't use a guard, I think riving knives or splitters are a HUGE deal to have.
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post #5 of 7 Old 04-05-2011, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo G View Post
Well, I don't see any reason you need to inform them that the saw will do what it does. Just tell them that it is a normal saw and it is very dangerous and to treat it as such. If someone does slip, the fact that they don't know that it will retract won't make a difference, the saw will do it's job. If they think it can hurt them it will keep them on their toes more so than if they know they can't really get hurt bad.
Leo,
That is the most intelligent thing that I have ever seen about SawStop.

An instructor, much smarter than I, said that if a student learns how to use a table saw safely, they are safe on every table saw. This is at a school where there has not been a digit loss.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
Huntington Beach, California
Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
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post #6 of 7 Old 04-06-2011, 12:09 AM
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I have my moments.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
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post #7 of 7 Old 04-08-2011, 12:03 PM
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I tend to disagree, its like telling a teenager, or anybody for that matter that the seatbelt in the car is there to keep you from being ejected and will keep you safe. A driver is still going to be cautious when driving even with it on. I consider myself a very good driver, my wife will tell you different, but I still wear the safety belt. Even though I am a good driver, in my mind, the world isn't perfect and outside factors can still cause me to crash. Same with using a table saw, I can be safe all day long, but any minor outside force can put you in the emergency room in the blink of an eye. I have a Sawstop, I have been using it for about a year or so now, I still respect it every time that switch goes into the on position.

As far as the DC I find mine to be very good, better than my Jet certainly but the Jet was old and didn't have a dust shroud. If I am ripping plywood with the blade up and no guard you will get some spray back but I find thats the case with any table saw with a ZC insert. If I put the Sawstop overarm DC blade guard on I get 0 dust. What DC setup are you guys running?
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