Rigid TS3660 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 06-25-2008, 03:22 PM Thread Starter
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Rigid TS3660

Looking at the TS3650 or TS3660 Rigid. Would like to know if either or both saws can be simply rebolted so that the Ext.table/fence can be used on the LEFT side of the blade?

In other words simply move the ext table to the left side of blade

I would like the table and fence the largest on the left side?

Thanks
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post #2 of 17 Old 06-25-2008, 03:44 PM
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Thinking back to when I assembled mine, I would say yes you can do what you are asking. Seems like everything is perfectly symmetrical on the saw. There is the center table that has the blade perfectly in the center with a miter slot on each side, again, equadistant from the blade. Then there are TWO wings that you bolt on, one on each side. So at this point, everything is perfectly symmetrical. Then when you put the fence support on, you would simply bolt it on offset to the left side instead of the right. The only thing is, the scale won't be correct. Keep in mind also that this is a left tilt saw only. I'll take a closer look when I get home tonight.

Bud

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post #3 of 17 Old 06-25-2008, 04:31 PM Thread Starter
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Rigid TS3660 - 3650

Thank you
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post #4 of 17 Old 06-26-2008, 09:24 AM
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Ok Woodbob, I took a real close look at my saw last night and it will reverse. The fence rails are slotted so they will slide left or right however far you want, no problem.

Bud

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post #5 of 17 Old 06-27-2008, 08:33 AM Thread Starter
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Ts3660

Is yours the 3560 or the new 3660, or are both machined the same?

Thank you again for your help. Looks like I'll buy one.
post #6 of 17 Old 06-27-2008, 09:09 AM
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Mine is the 3660. Long story. I had been wanting the 3650 for a long time and I finally decided to get one about 4 months ago. I went to HD to look at it one more time near where I work and instead of it being $549, it was $467. I asked the guy what's up with that? He said Ridgid is coming out with a new model so they are discounting the old 3650's. I went back to work and called Ridgid and they confirmed his story. I asked what the difference is betweeen the 3650 and the new 3660, thinking maybe I'd wait for the new model. They said it was cosmetic only. I work about an hour from where I live so I decided to go home and buy it from the HD near home. When I went to get it that evening, it was the 3660 and it was $467. I didn't ask any questions and just bought it. It's been a super nice saw. So far, I haven't seen anything that I don't like. Oh sure, it's not a Unisaw or a Powermatic, but I don't need that kind of saw. In my opinion, it's probably the best you can buy for under $700 and one heck of a homeowner saw. You won't be disappointed with either the 3650 or the 3660.

Bud

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post #7 of 17 Old 06-27-2008, 11:50 PM
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Rigid 3650 vs 3660

The Rigid guy happened to be in the store when I was looking at their table saws. He said the only difference is that the 3650 came in two boxes and the 3660 comes in one box.

I did a lot of research on the internet on the saw at it got great reviews.
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post #8 of 17 Old 06-28-2008, 08:05 AM Thread Starter
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Ts3660


My concern with a so called "Right handed" saw is that I've been

using a "Left handed" saw for 40 years and I'm concerned about

changing at this stage. Don't want any accidents.

Thanks for all the help with the Rigid! I'll be purchasing one soon.
post #9 of 17 Old 09-04-2008, 04:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post

My concern with a so called "Right handed" saw is that I've been

using a "Left handed" saw for 40 years and I'm concerned about

changing at this stage. Don't want any accidents.

Thanks for all the help with the Rigid! I'll be purchasing one soon.

Funny, I have been having this same discussion with myself! I am left-handed and it is really a joy to use a tool that is set up for a left-handed person. I figured using a right tilting saw with the fence on the left side would be a joy for me. Then after more consideration I started to see some problems with this: 1) I have been using left tilting saws since high school (a long time! ). 2) Since I am left-handed feeding stock through with the right hand has one big advantage for me should I (knock on wood ) ever have an accident it would probably be to my right digits and thus be a lesser evil . 3) There is always muscle memory to consider! Have you ever had to use the other hand to do something that you usually do with your dominant hand? If it is something you have done for some time, i.e. a repetitive motion, your muscles have memory and can do the motion without much input from the brain. It would take some retraining to use the other hand.
So at this point in time I think I'll stick with what I am comfortable with and hopefully avoid accidents

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post #10 of 17 Old 09-04-2008, 05:32 PM
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goingenoan, you bring up some interesting questions for me. I have a left tilting saw, thus making it a right handed saw, I believe. Now, by my nature or some weird coincidence, I generally set my fence up on the left side of my saw, but stand wherever feels more comfortable for the particular cut I'm making at the time. Generally speaking, that means I'm on whatever side is going to be my "finished" piece and leave the scrap to be on the opposite side, no matter where I'm standing. The exception is when I'm ripping small pieces and need to push larger stock, in which case I'm standing on the side of the large stock so I can push without crossing the blade.

From what I've read here and elsewhere this doesn't seem to be the norm. People seem to favor one side over the other and I haven't decided if I'm doing something actually wrong (or unsafe) or if I'm just one of those odd people that doesn't do things quite like every one else (which wouldn't be a strange thing for me).

Anyone have any suggestions as to whether what I do isn't safe? I've never felt particularly unsafe in the things I do and I generally do it because I feel safer in that particular position, no matter which side I'm on at the time. I never reach across the blade so I don't see any reason why I shouldn't do it this way, but I'll be happy to have people tell me I'm wrong if I'm being unsafe and shouldn't do this.

FrankP
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post #11 of 17 Old 09-04-2008, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by frankp View Post
goingenoan, you bring up some interesting questions for me. I have a left tilting saw, thus making it a right handed saw, I believe. Now, by my nature or some weird coincidence, I generally set my fence up on the left side of my saw, but stand wherever feels more comfortable for the particular cut I'm making at the time. Generally speaking, that means I'm on whatever side is going to be my "finished" piece and leave the scrap to be on the opposite side, no matter where I'm standing. The exception is when I'm ripping small pieces and need to push larger stock, in which case I'm standing on the side of the large stock so I can push without crossing the blade.

From what I've read here and elsewhere this doesn't seem to be the norm. People seem to favor one side over the other and I haven't decided if I'm doing something actually wrong (or unsafe) or if I'm just one of those odd people that doesn't do things quite like every one else (which wouldn't be a strange thing for me).

Anyone have any suggestions as to whether what I do isn't safe? I've never felt particularly unsafe in the things I do and I generally do it because I feel safer in that particular position, no matter which side I'm on at the time. I never reach across the blade so I don't see any reason why I shouldn't do it this way, but I'll be happy to have people tell me I'm wrong if I'm being unsafe and shouldn't do this.

FrankP

Hiya FrankP!
If I understand you correctly I think you may have a problem. For safety reasons you should position your body to be on the waste side of the blade. That is to say, if you are cutting with the fence on the left of the blade and pushing with your left hand then you should be standing to the right of the blade so if the saw should happen to pinch and spit out the board it would not smack you with devastating results. ( I once saw a man cutting some narrow pine and the blade pinched it and shot it over 50 feet away! Looked like a missle going by at waist height!) I can add some more advice and this advice comes from others that have a lot more experience than I do is: One of the big safety issues with right vs left tilting saws occurs when doing bevel cuts. If you use a right-tilting saw with the fence on the right side there is a possibility of the lumber becoming pinched between the blade and fence and thus possible serious consequences for the operator. I think the same would apply for a bevel cut on a left-tilting saw with the fence on the left side of the blade. Again, you want to position your body on the waste side of the blade.
That's my 2 cents worth and again I am not a teacher and will obviously defer to those that have more experience !
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post #12 of 17 Old 09-05-2008, 09:53 AM
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So, going by your advice, goingenoan, no matter which side is more likely to get pinched, I should always be on the waste side? That is very counter intuitive to me but I guess makes a little sense. In the end, my method has always been, the side least likely to be launched at me, though I stand off to the side (not in front of the wood) 98% of the time either way.
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post #13 of 17 Old 09-28-2008, 12:41 AM
 
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Question 3650 vs. 3660

I am about to buy a table saw and it's down to a 3650 or a 3660. I have heard the the arbor in the 3650 was too short for a fully stacked dado set. Can anyone verify that? If so is the arbor on the 3660 a bit longer so as to accomodate an 13/16" blade set?
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post #14 of 17 Old 09-28-2008, 06:04 AM
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Originally Posted by goingenoan View Post
Hiya FrankP!
If I understand you correctly I think you may have a problem. For safety reasons you should position your body to be on the waste side of the blade. That is to say, if you are cutting with the fence on the left of the blade and pushing with your left hand then you should be standing to the right of the blade so if the saw should happen to pinch and spit out the board it would not smack you with devastating results. ( I once saw a man cutting some narrow pine and the blade pinched it and shot it over 50 feet away! Looked like a missle going by at waist height!) I can add some more advice and this advice comes from others that have a lot more experience than I do is: One of the big safety issues with right vs left tilting saws occurs when doing bevel cuts. If you use a right-tilting saw with the fence on the right side there is a possibility of the lumber becoming pinched between the blade and fence and thus possible serious consequences for the operator. I think the same would apply for a bevel cut on a left-tilting saw with the fence on the left side of the blade. Again, you want to position your body on the waste side of the blade.
That's my 2 cents worth and again I am not a teacher and will obviously defer to those that have more experience !
A very good explanation!!!

I think many people are not aware of the danger of pinched and subsequently flying pieces of wood.

Everybody should read and heed these words.

George
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post #15 of 17 Old 09-28-2008, 06:09 AM
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I am somewhat confused by the initial conversation. I guess that I thought that all saws had the capability of using the fence anywhere on the whole side, regardless of the side.

This is the way my Craftsman is made and also any others that I have used, including the big industrial model at Eglin AFB hobby shop. On my saw the fence ralis extend 24" either side of the blade. The scale is zero at the blade and also goes zero to 24" either side of the blade.

Why would a saw be made where the fence can only be used on one side?

George
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post #16 of 17 Old 09-28-2008, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
I am somewhat confused by the initial conversation. I guess that I thought that all saws had the capability of using the fence anywhere on the whole side, regardless of the side.

This is the way my Craftsman is made and also any others that I have used, including the big industrial model at Eglin AFB hobby shop. On my saw the fence ralis extend 24" either side of the blade. The scale is zero at the blade and also goes zero to 24" either side of the blade.

Why would a saw be made where the fence can only be used on one side?

George
Hi George - Sometimes folks prefer to gain alot of rip capacity on one side of the blade or the other as opposed to splitting the capacity. Saws that are left tilt are less likely to ever need to use the fence on the left side of the blade, so you can take advantage of the additional rail capacity on the right. I've slid the rails to the right on my last two saws and have gained about 10" rip capacity on the right....they ended up at 0" left/40", and 0" left/36" respectively. I think if you slide the rails of the 3660, you'll get close to 50" to the right, but you do have to be mindful of the strength of the aluminum rails and add support.
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post #17 of 17 Old 09-28-2008, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by knotscott View Post
Hi George - Sometimes folks prefer to gain alot of rip capacity on one side of the blade or the other as opposed to splitting the capacity. Saws that are left tilt are less likely to ever need to use the fence on the left side of the blade, so you can take advantage of the additional rail capacity on the right. I've slid the rails to the right on my last two saws and have gained about 10" rip capacity on the right....they ended up at 0" left/40", and 0" left/36" respectively. I think if you slide the rails of the 3660, you'll get close to 50" to the right, but you do have to be mindful of the strength of the aluminum rails and add support.
OK. Then the discussion is about aftermarket changes to the fence setup. I got the impression that the saws were coming from the factory with the fence rails only on one side of the blade. I thought that this was rather a cheap way to manufacture a saw.

I can understand that a person may want to bias the capacity to one side so they make this change deliberately and this is not a design problem.

G
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