Experience with a DEWALT DWE7480 Table Saw? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 10-09-2016, 11:57 PM Thread Starter
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Experience with a DEWALT DWE7480 Table Saw?

I'm looking to upgrade my old worn out junker table saw and get something a little nicer, and newer. After reading and watching some reviews, it seems like a fairly good match. I'm not looking to spend big money on a bench/cabinet style saw at the moment. The Dewalt seems to have a fairly nice fence setup, with the fence always staying square with a gear system. I would build this into a homemade cabinet, so it should be sufficient.

Any of you people have any experience with this model, or even similar newer Dewalt models?

OR, if you have a suggestion for what you think is a better saw, or a good alternative for the same price range ($350-$450), please share.

Last edited by Jesse Blair; 10-10-2016 at 12:21 AM.
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post #2 of 19 Old 10-10-2016, 07:15 AM
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There isn't anything wrong with buying a used table saw. You could save enough to at least get a contractor saw. Those little saws like the Dewalt are intended to be more portable than useful. They just lack the power to do any serious work.
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post #3 of 19 Old 10-10-2016, 08:08 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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a little about table saws....

Tables saws have 3 parts, the table, the fence and the motor/arbor.

Compact saws like the DWE7480 have a very small table. There is very little space in front of the blade to place a board to cross cut. There is very little length to support a board for ripping which is the principle use of the fence and a table saw. You can't fit a larger panel on the table to cut it to size. They may be useful in a pinch like remodeling or framing, but not very useful for woodworking in general. Smaller table saws with aluminum tables are not the best for woodworking, and cast iron is much better.

The fence is the heart of any table saw and the most used and operated accessory. The fence is used for ripping which is the one operation that can not be done accurately with any other woodworking machine. It should be long enough to get a good registration against the workpiece and it should lock up precisely parallel to the miter slot and blade. It should be easy to slide and lock down accurately.

The motor can be a direct drive or a belt drive. Most quality table saws from contractor types and hybrids to cabinet saws have a belt drive motor. Craftsman made some direct drive 12" contractor saws in the 1980's and I have 3 of those, but they are rare. They use the same motor as they used on their 10" and 12" radial arm saws and it's just fine for general woodworking. Craftsman motors that are rated at "3 HP" on the side of the base, are NOT really 3 HP. A 3 Hp motor needs to be run only on 220 volts. The most HP you can get on 120 volts is about 1 3/4 HP. at 20 amps.

Used saws come in all sizes and flavors. If you search on Craig's List, post the link and we can give you advice as to the merits of the saw. I have purchased about 5 or 6 saws, both RAS's and table saws from Craig's List with excellent results. :smile3:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-10-2016 at 08:28 AM.
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post #4 of 19 Old 10-10-2016, 11:31 AM Thread Starter
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The only table saws I have found on local Craigslist are either ancient and worn out looking, or are similar compact contractor/jobsite saws. I'm not seeming to find much between the compact contractor saws and the giant multi thousands of dollars cabinet style saws. The one I already have is a small contractor saw with portable base, and it seems to work well enough for me, especially if I were to build a workstation/table for it. I just want a saw that isn't so old and where all of the parts are sloppy loose and worn. Would a contractor saw built into a table not be good enough for most woodshop needs?
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post #5 of 19 Old 10-10-2016, 01:35 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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worn out looking?

Saws don't really wear out. The bearings may get dry and squeal and be loose, but that's about all that can go wrong from use. A crappy fence is a crappy fence whether it's new or 20 years old. That's the key to having an accurate saw... a decent fence. Some old Craftsman fences are beyond hope, but a new one will make a "new saw" out an old one. just ask the guys here!

Post a photo or 2 of what you have so we can give advice..... and especially the fence , front and rear. Usually a fence that locks on both the front and rear rails can be very touch to get aligned properly.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 19 Old 10-10-2016, 08:09 PM
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There is a big difference in the size of the saws; cabinet vs compact. The compact saw is loud.
I love the rack and pinion fence system on the DeWalt.

Something to think about is the arbor is short and a dado stack won't fit on the compact saw.

Good luck.
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post #7 of 19 Old 10-10-2016, 09:55 PM
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From what you are saying I believe I would refurbish the saw you have. You could make a table for it and upgrade the fence system. What model saw do you have?
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post #8 of 19 Old 10-10-2016, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
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Is a cheap brand, that was already second or third hand when I got it. Pro-Tech 10". I don't have a picture of mine, but it's this same model. The fence is a sloppy, loose nightmare that doesn't fasten down tightly, and doesn't even have proper rails. It just pinches the front and rear of the table. And it has no riving knife/splitter or kickback protection of any kind. It's basically a jobsite saw for ripping plywood. And the table is pretty beat up. I do have a sled that I built for it that helps, but it's still a pretty crappy saw.


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post #9 of 19 Old 10-11-2016, 12:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Saws don't really wear out. The bearings may get dry and squeal and be loose, but that's about all that can go wrong from use. A crappy fence is a crappy fence whether it's new or 20 years old. That's the key to having an accurate saw... a decent fence. Some old Craftsman fences are beyond hope, but a new one will make a "new saw" out an old one. just ask the guys here!

Post a photo or 2 of what you have so we can give advice..... and especially the fence , front and rear. Usually a fence that locks on both the front and rear rails can be very touch to get aligned properly.
This is pretty much everything i wanted to say, great minds and crazy people think alike i suppose!

In all seriousness though, hes right, saws dont really wear out. About the only part that could die is the bearings, but thats an easy replacement. Everything else is pretty well bulletproof, theres a lot of guys out there using table saws from the 50's and 60's. Heck, i personally have a drill press from the 30-40's, and a bandsaw from the 50's. Both still work perfectly. Dont discount used tools because they look worn, not until you see em in person and check out the bones

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post #10 of 19 Old 10-11-2016, 07:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse Blair View Post
The only table saws I have found on local Craigslist are either ancient and worn out looking,
Ancient and worn out looking? Sounds like a good old saw I would be looking for!
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post #11 of 19 Old 10-11-2016, 07:24 AM
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The Pro Tech saw is junk

A saw that has been owed by 3 different people has probably been trashed. No reason not to get a better saw whether new or used.

A cast iron saw top with a decent fence would be so much better. Often you can find a "starter" saw at a place and at a price you would not think of looking at. I haven't looked at this one, but it may be worth checking out if there are no used saws in your area.

https://www.menards.com/main/tools-h...63759633334057

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #12 of 19 Old 10-11-2016, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
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Ancient and worn out looking? Sounds like a good old saw I would be looking for!
I have nothing against old tools, but in the case of a table saw, I'd prefer one at least made somewhat recently that has some measure of safety. I'd at least like to have one with a splitter/riving knife to avoid possible wood missiles.
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post #13 of 19 Old 10-11-2016, 07:00 PM
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I have nothing against old tools, but in the case of a table saw, I'd prefer one at least made somewhat recently that has some measure of safety. I'd at least like to have one with a splitter/riving knife to avoid possible wood missiles.
Splitters and riving knives don't eliminate that possibility, the only thing that does that is knowing how to use the tool. Relying on safety devices rather than common sense to keep you safe only ends in injury. Old saws are perfectly safe, so long as you use them correctly.

I started off with an older craftsman saw with no riving knife, blade guard and a crappy fence, but I never injured myself until I upgraded to a delta saw with all the bells and whistles
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post #14 of 19 Old 10-11-2016, 08:16 PM
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the splitter ....

The splitter is a safety device that is not well know for it's "other" function, which is maintaining the workpiece against the fence. As well as keeping the kerf open it's even more important to maintain constant registration against the fence. The instant the work moves away from the fence at the rear, it can ride up and over the blade and become an "incoming missle". Ask me how I know this.

This has nothing to do with knowing how top operate the saw, UNLESS you are aware of that possibility and always maintain downward, inward and forward control of the workpiece. Don't ask me how how I know this. :smile3:

I removed my blade guard and splitter years ago when it "got in the way" too often. I finally realized the "other" function after getting hit in the gut by a piece of plywood. I have used them consistently for about the last 15 years with no incidents. There are times of course when it has to come off to make partial kerfs like rabbets or tenons.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-11-2016 at 09:03 PM.
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post #15 of 19 Old 10-11-2016, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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It's more about piece of mind for me. I've used one without a splitter for years without issue, but it's always in my mind that if something happens and the offcut piece get's twisted and touches the back of the blade, things could go wrong pretty quickly.
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post #16 of 19 Old 10-12-2016, 04:18 AM
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I should elaborate, im not advocating not using a splitter/riving knife, or saying they serve no function, not in the least. My statement was more to advocate not eliminating a saw because it didnt have a riving knife with it. If you can get something like a unisaw for $400 used, then the lack of a splitter shouldnt keep you from getting it

Im also of the mindset that any safety device, be it a blade guard, riving knife, splitter or whatever, the devices should be secondary to common sense and mindfullness

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post #17 of 19 Old 10-12-2016, 08:46 AM
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offcut piece gets twisted...?

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Originally Posted by Jesse Blair View Post
It's more about piece of mind for me. I've used one without a splitter for years without issue, but it's always in my mind that if something happens and the offcut piece get's twisted and touches the back of the blade, things could go wrong pretty quickly.
There is "gets twisted" and there is "twists".... a big difference.

When cutting some woods the kerf may tend to close up and pinch the blade, either stalling the saw or propelling the work over top of the blade back at the operator, however, I have not had that happen to me.
I have the blade stall and then I simply shut it off with no harm. In either case, there is no "twist" involved.

As far as the offcut "getting twisted" ... that can only be operator error, if it's possible at all. Your feed pressure should never be on the offcut, only the piece against the fence.I have great difficulty seeing how the condition you describe would happen, but I could be wrong.

The piece against the fence must be controlled, not just push/shoved through. Controlled means held down, pushed laterally or to the right against the fence, and finally pushed forward. Your thumb position is important for this lateral control and can "steer" the work when pushed forward. At some point in the cut you will lose the ability to fully control the piece and that's when you reach for your push block. A good push block will allow you to feed the work, forward, press it against the fence and hold it down on the table, all at the same time. There are NOT many push blocks that are good at all 3 aspects.

The riving knife or the splitter helps maintain the lateral pressure against the fence, however slight. At the minimum, it will not allow it to rotate away from the fence. This is the "other" function which I described above, as is not well advertised and in some cases, and not even mentioned.

Plywood and other sheet goods are not known to pinch the blade at the rear because they are stable, unlike natural wood which may have tension grain internally.
Plywood WILL come away from the fence if there is no splitter OR the operator does not maintain proper control. Don't ask me how how I know this. :frown2:

You can operate a table saw for years without fully understanding the physics involved and have no mishaps. It's much better to understand the physics of any machine with rotating cutter or blades to be a safe operator. :smile3:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #18 of 19 Old 10-12-2016, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse Blair View Post

Would a contractor saw built into a table not be good enough for most woodshop needs?
A Delta contractors saw would not need to be built into a table.
This saw is sufficiently large enough to be a stand alone piece in your shop.
Adding retractable rollers is advised.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #19 of 19 Old 10-13-2016, 03:10 AM Thread Starter
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A Delta contractors saw would not need to be built into a table.
This saw is sufficiently large enough to be a stand alone piece in your shop.
Adding retractable rollers is advised.
I was actually looking at the Delta 36-725 earlier. A bit more than what I was wanting to spend, but it looks like it's worth the extra money ($600).

http://www.deltamachinery.com/produc.../item/36-725-2
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