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ScottWood 10-07-2013 11:45 PM

Bosch 4100-09 10-inch Table Saw - My First Experience
 
I'd posted this on the diychat forum and realized I probably should have put it here... Anyway...

So I just got this thing today. After way too much time researching options and trying to find something in the $300 range, I had to bump up to what ended up being a $569 saw from Amazon. I'd tried to buy it at HD, but they were out of stock and couldn't even tell me when they could order one. (Though he's not on commission, the Bosch guy working in the store was really annoyed.)

Anyway... here's my experience so far:

SHORT INITIAL IMPRESSION: This thing rocks. Cuts accurately right out of box. Setup time: It took me a couple hours, actually more due to some interruptions. But I was being methodical. (In other words, I'm probably a bit slow.)

The Box showed up via FedEx. Again, got from Amazon and since we're Prime members, shipping was free:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1652-M.jpg

The accessories, (safety stuff, fence, etc), were all on top:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1653-M.jpg

And next layer... the saw itself. Note on the upper right part of pic you can make out the styrofoam block under the motor. Per instructions, critical to remove this as if you don't, raising or lowering blade can supposedly damage mechanism:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1654-M.jpg

Finally, the gravity rise stand:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1657-M.jpg

Raw saw, no parts assembled yet. By "assembled" I really mean just not having attached the safety parts, fence, etc. And then checking for square and making any adjustments. Which, as I'll get to in a moment, really was just a formality as everything was aligned.
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1656-M.jpg

Stand parts Check:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1658-M.jpg

Stand Assembled:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1659-M.jpg

Saw Mounted on Stand:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1660-M.jpg

With all the safety stuff installed:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1662-M.jpg

Standing up and ready for storage:
http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1661-M.jpg

Now, for some of the important stuff. This thing was ready to go out of the box in terms of the saw setup. I followed all the instructions in the manual to check for square on the blade, miter, fence, and check the riving knife, measuring scales and everything else. All was pretty much perfect. I didn't have to adjust a thing. I didn't have time to start any projects as we were meeting people for dinner, but obviously, some cuts have to be made. Check the accuracy in next post as forum apparently limits to 10 images per post...

ScottWood 10-07-2013 11:46 PM

Part 2 of 2:

It's maybe a bit hard to see, but the scale index is on exactly 12" and the board is cut at 12" Nice.

http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1663-M.jpg

Then I tried the miter gauge at 45 degrees. And the small piece of poplar? Pretty much spot on:

http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1665-M.jpg

Both cuts were made with the stock blade. While I'm going to replace it with a nicer blade for the plywood I anticipate slicing up most of the time, you can see from the miter cut on the poplar board that the stock blade is pretty good. (Can't tell much from the sheathing plywood cut as it's such crappy wood anyway.)

Also, note the following, which could be useful: I'm mostly going to use this outside. Or maybe in garage as this is where I stain stuff. (I just don't like to do that stuff in downstairs workshop.) The Stanley FatMax sawhorses are height adjustable letting me make a perfect easy to setup and breakdown outfeed table. (Or maybe left side support if I want that one day.)

http://scottgermaise.smugmug.com/Ran...IMG_1666-M.jpg

That's about it. In short, with all of a handful of test cuts, I'm really happy with this thing so far. No more running to friends' houses to rip stuff! The cost was a bit painful, but I really wanted an accurate saw and fence, etc. I've got newbie average skills and I thought a more solid tool would be worth the extra $$$ in the end.

If anyone has any questions, let me know. I'm going to be playing with this more in the next few weeks of course. (Have to build some furniture now to justify this particular tool to wife!)

Scott

Dopalgangr 10-08-2013 10:37 AM

Nice review! I have the Ridgid TS2400LS jobsite saw that I purchased several years ago. Its built fairly well but I have some issues with blade angles not holding once tightened and fence accuracy. I've been thinking of replacing it and cant decide if I should go with another portable like yours or a fixed style. The table on this one seems small to me but Im more inclined for accuracy and portability since I have a small workshop to begin with. Let me know if you run into any issues with it. Thanks, Glen BTW, I'm in Maryland, what part of the NE you in?

woodnthings 10-08-2013 10:46 AM

I have the earlier 4000 model
 
The only issue I have is when releasing the blade tilt lever the whole carriage falls loose and there is no crank to get it precisly at a specific angle. You can work around that with careful setting and the use of an digital Angle Box, like a Wixey.
Other wise it is accurate, powerful enough, the fence is accurate and light enough to be truly "portable". I really like mine.
http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/bshts4000rvu.html

You can find one used on EBay.

ScottWood 10-08-2013 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dopalgangr (Post 527397)
I've been thinking of replacing it and cant decide if I should go with another portable like yours or a fixed style. The table on this one seems small to me but Im more inclined for accuracy and portability since I have a small workshop to begin with. Let me know if you run into any issues with it. Thanks, Glen BTW, I'm in Maryland, what part of the NE you in?

From what I saw, (pun intended), most of the portables have relatively small tables compared to what the big kids use. As you can see in the pics, my half-555 solution to this is use the easily adjustable FatMax sawhorses. It's a little bit of a hassle to set up, but I'm cutting in driveway anyway; maybe in garage, so I have to set it all up anyhow.

We're in CT, so come the bad weather, I'll either have to haul it down to workshop / basement if I want to do things. More likely, just not do much table sawing over winter. (Unless I can get the portable heater in garage fixed cheaply.)

ScottWood 10-08-2013 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodnthings (Post 527399)
The only issue I have is when releasing the blade tilt lever the whole carriges falls loose and there is no crank to get it precisly at a specific angle. You can work around that with careful setting and the use of an digital Angle Box, like a Wixey.

That thing looks cool. Will have to add it one day. For now, I just want another blade and then I'm done for awhile. After this non-trivial purchase, if any more "this seems new, when did you get this?" little items pop up, the only tools I'll need are two good running sneakers.

Dopalgangr 10-09-2013 11:40 AM

I have the Wixey tilt thing and it works great. I ended up having one of those "deals that I couldn't pass up" on Craigslist last night. Picked up a Jet JPS-10TS in mint condition with numerous add-ons (dado set, premium mitre gauge, taper jig, custom outfeed table, etc) for $450. I felt so good I didn't even haggle since the saws are selling for $1200 new. So now I have the Ridgid going on CLIST.

Becca 10-09-2013 10:13 PM

I've had mine for about a year now and it has been consistently accurate. This turned out to be one of the better tool decisions I've made in a long time. I wish I had gotten it a lot sooner.

Burt 11-06-2013 06:48 PM

I've had the 4000 about 6 years now with absolutely no problems and still accurate too. Did have to buy a new WoodWorker II blade for it though.
This sled is perfect for the Bosch portables.... http://www.rockler.com/portable-cross-cut-sled

EastexToolJunky 12-07-2013 11:28 PM

Having a saw that stored easily was a must for me. I work in the garage and store my tools in a small room. I had the same pleasant set up experience. I replaced the stock blade with a cmt combination blade. Love the saw, just have to build me a mobile out feed table.

Mark G 12-08-2013 02:00 PM

How is that fold out stand? It looks jiggly and bouncy like a folding baby stroller. Would you say it is solid?

kabyt 12-08-2013 02:06 PM

Extensions
 
I'm looking at getting this saw and found these. Decent reviews and adds a lot of functionality.


Outfeed Extension - http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-TS1002-Outfeed-Support-Extension/dp/B00004R5S0
Left side Extension - http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-TS1003-Table-Support-Extension/dp/B00004R5S2

ScottWood 12-08-2013 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kabyt (Post 549386)
I'm looking at getting this saw and found these. Decent reviews and adds a lot of functionality.

Left side Extension - Bosch TS1003 Table Saw Left Side Support Extension - Amazon.com

A few weeks ago I added the left side extension. Works great. I'd been using a Ridgid flip top work support, but you really can't get that quite close enough. For the rear out feed, I'll use the Ridgid for boards up to maybe 24" or go back to my original set up of plywood on top of sawhorses if I'm cutting large pieces of plywood.

Mark G 12-09-2013 10:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark G
How is that fold out stand? It looks jiggly and bouncy like a folding baby stroller. Would you say it is solid?

Anybody?

Backbevel 12-10-2013 01:57 AM

I bought one couple years ago for a job site.Been using it at the shop it is a nice small unit.Wish it had different throat plate.It lives outside under a canopy not much to rust but the blade.
The fold up stand is a little bit rocky and I guess you could use it for a baby stroller but seems kinda unsafe since it's at table saw.With the right adapter kit I guess it could work.:laughing:

Gilgaron 12-10-2013 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark G (Post 549898)
Anybody?

Solid as a rock. The wheels are solid, not air tube, so no bounce. You can wheel it around while it is folded out, too, and it doesn't rack or anything.

ScottWood 12-10-2013 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark G (Post 549382)
How is that fold out stand? It looks jiggly and bouncy like a folding baby stroller. Would you say it is solid?

When fully set up in 'table saw mode' it's completely solid. The easy way to tell this is you get straight cuts. If things were wobbling around, this would be less likely.

When in 'storage / stand up mode' it's also not going anywhere. It's potentially a little more tippy in this case if something were to hit it just wrong in the garage or something. But basically, also not going anywhere. The only thing I'd like to see - and maybe I'll add this my self - is some grippy stuff of some sort on the metal touching the floor. Over time, I think this might get scraped up and risk some rust. So now that I think about it, yeah… I'll find something to solve that.

Folding it up is easy. You do kind of have to get the knack for it, but once you've got it figured out, no problem. Opening it up can be a little bit of a hassle as you have to unlock the wheels with the handle and then pull them kind of backwards before you move the whole thing forwards… hard to explain. You kind of have to try it. Which you can do if you can find a store that's got one on display. This is essentially a trivial matter. It's easy enough to do.

Anyway, most seem to agree the stand is rock solid. For those who say otherwise, I'd be curious as to what they're comparing it to or what's going on.

Scott

ScottWood 12-10-2013 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Backbevel (Post 549956)
Wish it had different throat plate.


http://www.leecraftzeroclearance.com

woodtink 12-10-2013 01:18 PM

I can also vouche for it being very very solid. So solid I have ripped 8 x 4 sheets of plywood by myself and it didnt budge.

Backbevel 12-10-2013 09:57 PM

After reading everyone's comment about their stand I went out this morning and braved the cold.So I tightened up the nuts and the wheels sure enough much better.I guess moving in and out of the truck everyday for about a year loosened it up.
Still think calling it rock solid is a bit of a stretch.
it was at least 45 degrees out side this morning.Dont worry I made it back inside safely but I had run out of marshmallows for my hot coco.Aj


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