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post #1 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 03:31 PM Thread Starter
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Young Woodworker Need Help

Hello,

I'm 20 years old and a novice woodworker here, looking to work on a few projects. I need some advice.

The first one, is going to be a coat rack out of a small pear tree. What are opinions on dye? I'm torn between what color would look nice. Not sure if I should go dark or light. I feel I would like either way. Where is the best place online to get dye? Also, what should I topcoat it with? The wood has cracked quite a bit in two spots. I was drying it in a small room with a dehumidifier, but pear is prone to cracking easily so I stopped that. I don't mind the look at all, just want to keep it structurally sound enough to work.

Also, what about sanding in some of these smaller lopsided areas? Just hand sand nice and slow I'm thinking. How much sanding will be necessary for it to look good? When it dried after I peeled the bark it got a dark coating tint to it that I'm sanding off. I'm almost thinking that where it's hard to sand it off near knots might actually look good after being dyed.



That's my current main project. I have a few more strip jobs. I have no idea where to start with what chemicals can strip what finishes. Is there a general rule of where to start then what ones to go to? I picked up this coffee table for $15 bucks today. Looks like oak. How should I strip this to give it a light sand then a fresh coat of...??? Give me some options.




Also this vanity for my girlfriend. I'm wondering if there is a chance I could match the color, if I could only redo the top and leave the rest. What do you think? How should I strip that?



Last one, I made this walnut cutting board last year. It is actually only two pieces of quarter sawn black walnut my dad had laying around (he has a wood shop). Literally glued them together, sanded then used mineral oil and bees wax to coat. I want to make it into an end grain cutting board, so I would be cutting it width wise then re-glueing. How should I remove the mineral oil or will it glue fine with a light coating on it? You can see that it needs another coat, which I won't be applying. This wears off every few uses and I usually reapply once a month or so. It's been a while and it was just washed. Also has a nice water mark from a roommate last year.



Thanks in advance for any help, looking forward to getting a move on with these projects!
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post #2 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 03:52 PM
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Is the coffee table solid oak? Or is it a veneer?

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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post #3 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 04:23 PM Thread Starter
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Veneer
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post #4 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 04:48 PM
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One problem you are going to have is the pear wood is going to take six to eight years before it's dry enough it won't crack.

The coffee table and vanity I would strip outdoors in good ventilation using Kleen Strip paint and varnish remover. There is a high likelyhood there is silicone contamination on the vanity. It might go easier for you if you would wash it down with a wax and grease remover such as Dupont Prepsol Solvent prior to stripping. The stripper a semi-paste remover so it's pretty thick and will stick to verticle surfaces. You apply a thick coat of the remover on and let is soak for 15 to 20 minutes retouching the places that might dry. Try not to do too much of it at once because the stripper is bad to evaporate. Once the finish is liquified then scrape the finish and remover off with a broad knife. Be sure to make sure there are no burrs on the broad knife to scratch the wood. Then as soon as possible after you get the finish off the residue left will need to be rinced off. You can use lacquer thinner with rags to clean the residue off frequently changing rags. It's important to get the residue completely off because the remover contains waxes which will interfere with the adhesion of the new finish. The residue can also be cleaned off with water. I use a small electric power washer that has only 1500 psi to rince the residue off. It will clean the furniture cleaner than anything you can use. I've stripped hundreds of pieces of furniture and the power washer does absolutly no damage to the furniture. The picture isn't clear enough to tell if the vanity is mahogany or just stained to like mahogany. If it is mahogany I would recommend using a pastewood grain filler to fill the grain. Sherwin Williams has a good one however it only comes in natural. They can add color to it to where you should be able to stain it and fill the grain in one step.

The cutting board I would recommend starting over. The mineral oil soakes too deep in the wood to really recycle it. I believe you would have trouble getting glue to adhere to it even if you thoroughly washed it down with acetone.
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post #5 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 06:46 PM Thread Starter
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One problem you are going to have is the pear wood is going to take six to eight years before it's dry enough it won't crack.
Do you think it will crack beyond usability? I don't mind the look of cracks, it's just a stupid little thing I'm going to try. I don't want it perfect, I want it to have a look of it not being perfect.

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The cutting board I would recommend starting over. The mineral oil soakes too deep in the wood to really recycle it. I believe you would have trouble getting glue to adhere to it even if you thoroughly washed it down with acetone.
That's fine, wasn't my biggest concern, it works fine how it is now.

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The coffee table and vanity I would strip outdoors in good ventilation using Kleen Strip paint and varnish remover. There is a high likelyhood there is silicone contamination on the vanity. It might go easier for you if you would wash it down with a wax and grease remover such as Dupont Prepsol Solvent prior to stripping. The stripper a semi-paste remover so it's pretty thick and will stick to verticle surfaces. You apply a thick coat of the remover on and let is soak for 15 to 20 minutes retouching the places that might dry. Try not to do too much of it at once because the stripper is bad to evaporate. Once the finish is liquified then scrape the finish and remover off with a broad knife. Be sure to make sure there are no burrs on the broad knife to scratch the wood. Then as soon as possible after you get the finish off the residue left will need to be rinced off. You can use lacquer thinner with rags to clean the residue off frequently changing rags. It's important to get the residue completely off because the remover contains waxes which will interfere with the adhesion of the new finish. The residue can also be cleaned off with water. I use a small electric power washer that has only 1500 psi to rince the residue off. It will clean the furniture cleaner than anything you can use. I've stripped hundreds of pieces of furniture and the power washer does absolutly no damage to the furniture. The picture isn't clear enough to tell if the vanity is mahogany or just stained to like mahogany. If it is mahogany I would recommend using a pastewood grain filler to fill the grain. Sherwin Williams has a good one however it only comes in natural. They can add color to it to where you should be able to stain it and fill the grain in one step.
Thanks for the rest of the info. I'll do my research...
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post #6 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 06:57 PM Thread Starter
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The Klean-Strip paint and varnish remover appears to be discontinued. Is there something that I would be able to get at Lowes to get this job done? The Klean-Strip remover mentioned is semi-paste?
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post #7 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bower4311 View Post
Hello,

I'm 20 years old and a novice woodworker here, looking to work on a few projects. I need some advice.

The first one, is going to be a coat rack out of a small pear tree. What are opinions on dye? I'm torn between what color would look nice. Not sure if I should go dark or light.
How long ago did the stick of pear wood come off the tree , and did you peel the bark off immediately or sometime later ?

The 'dark coating tint' that it got after you removed the bark is what happens to all timber surfaces , even ones that have been coated with some sort of finish

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 06-22-2013 at 07:42 PM.
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post #8 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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About a week, I removed the bark immediately. It was partially dead, the middle is slightly hollow at the bottom. I put it in my bathroom with the dehumidifier on a couple different days and it seemed to dry it quite a bit. I know it will take a long time to become fully seasoned.
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post #9 of 25 Old 06-22-2013, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by bower4311 View Post
The Klean-Strip paint and varnish remover appears to be discontinued. Is there something that I would be able to get at Lowes to get this job done? The Klean-Strip remover mentioned is semi-paste?
I don't think Klean-Strip has be discontinued. It is a semi-paste. I'm not really up to speed on environmental issues. Perhaps it's just not available in your state. I just bought a can of it last week in Texas at Home Depot. I normally can get it at Wal-mart. My second choice would be Bix original stripper. It's much the same however I think it's a little milder and would just take longer to soak the finish loose. If you are unable to get either you might look for a aircraft remover or a last resort use Citistrip.

I never have been fond of using wood that was air dried so I'm not really the one that could advise you on the pear wood. Generally wood should dry about a year for every inch thickness to be considered seasoned. Of course different conditions would make it dry faster and it will dry faster stood vertical. You would really need a moisture content meter to really tell.

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post #10 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 04:07 AM
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Originally Posted by bower4311 View Post
About a week, I removed the bark immediately. It was partially dead, the middle is slightly hollow at the bottom. I put it in my bathroom with the dehumidifier on a couple different days and it seemed to dry it quite a bit. I know it will take a long time to become fully seasoned.
It will be interesting to see how it behaves as it seasons/drys.

A good way to store seasoning wood is to seal the ends with a brush on wax solution , or dip the ends in hot wax , or brush it with paint or the like , and store it in a cool dark dry airy place, to slow down the moisture loss.
And leave the bark on for as long as possible too.

Seasoning can take a year of more depending on the type and thickness of the wood .
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post #11 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 12:21 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I don't think Klean-Strip has be discontinued. It is a semi-paste. I'm not really up to speed on environmental issues. Perhaps it's just not available in your state. I just bought a can of it last week in Texas at Home Depot. I normally can get it at Wal-mart. My second choice would be Bix original stripper. It's much the same however I think it's a little milder and would just take longer to soak the finish loose. If you are unable to get either you might look for a aircraft remover or a last resort use Citistrip.

I never have been fond of using wood that was air dried so I'm not really the one that could advise you on the pear wood. Generally wood should dry about a year for every inch thickness to be considered seasoned. Of course different conditions would make it dry faster and it will dry faster stood vertical. You would really need a moisture content meter to really tell.
This is what I ended up getting.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_40866-24-300...mby&facetInfo=

Reference this http://www.wmbarr.com/product.aspx?catid=98&prodid=204 (is that the right one? If so, then don't expect to see it too much longer.
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post #12 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 12:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Manuka Jock View Post
It will be interesting to see how it behaves as it seasons/drys.

A good way to store seasoning wood is to seal the ends with a brush on wax solution , or dip the ends in hot wax , or brush it with paint or the like , and store it in a cool dark dry airy place, to slow down the moisture loss.
And leave the bark on for as long as possible too.

Seasoning can take a year of more depending on the type and thickness of the wood .
My dad has a moisture meter and it read 18-20% in the middle on the side. Hopefully it won't crack too much more.

I will probably seal the ends with bees wax though.
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post #13 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 04:06 PM
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I hope the Formby's works well for you. I've never been impressed with anything Formby's makes so I stopped trying. The Lowe's website doesn't describe what is in the remover so all I can say is follow the label instructions. It does say it is flamable so that is a plus. If it is as runny as paint thinner be sure to work smaller areas at a time. With any remover you have to keep it wet and let the remover do the work. You shouldn't have to use an excessive amount of elbow grease to get the finish off.
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post #14 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 07:56 PM Thread Starter
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I hope the Formby's works well for you. I've never been impressed with anything Formby's makes so I stopped trying. The Lowe's website doesn't describe what is in the remover so all I can say is follow the label instructions. It does say it is flamable so that is a plus. If it is as runny as paint thinner be sure to work smaller areas at a time. With any remover you have to keep it wet and let the remover do the work. You shouldn't have to use an excessive amount of elbow grease to get the finish off.
There was no Formby's so I got a different brand. It has MC in it.

Last edited by bower4311; 06-23-2013 at 10:55 PM.
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post #15 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 08:50 PM
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This is what I ended up getting.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_40866-24-300...mby&facetInfo=

Reference this http://www.wmbarr.com/product.aspx?catid=98&prodid=204 (is that the right one? If so, then don't expect to see it too much longer.

I would use an MC (methylene chloride) based stripper. The best one I've used is available over the counter (box stores), is "Aircraft Stripper" in the blue can. Follow the directions on the can to a "T". It's gel like and stays in place.

I wouldn't use a pressure washer. It can tear out grain, loosen or remove prior fixes, cause joints to fail, interfere with the adhesion of glued areas, and lift veneer. It will unnecessarily raise the grain, which calls for more sanding than normal. If the piece is a veneer, that sanding may go through the veneer.






.
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post #16 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 09:52 PM
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I would use an MC (methylene chloride) based stripper.
While I know this was used years ago when I was in the US Air Force, this ingredient (also called Dichloromethane) has been mostly done away with. It is actually a confirmed animal carcinogen and a suspect human one. This is nasty stuff, so if you use it use it wisely and don't breathe it or get it on your skin as it can soak through your skin and get into you bloodstream.

Mark

"Measuring is the enemy of accuracy." Chris Schwartz
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post #17 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 10:52 PM Thread Starter
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I would use an MC (methylene chloride) based stripper. The best one I've used is available over the counter (box stores), is "Aircraft Stripper" in the blue can. Follow the directions on the can to a "T". It's gel like and stays in place.

I wouldn't use a pressure washer. It can tear out grain, loosen or remove prior fixes, cause joints to fail, interfere with the adhesion of glued areas, and lift veneer. It will unnecessarily raise the grain, which calls for more sanding than normal. If the piece is a veneer, that sanding may go through the veneer.






.
I didn't actually end up with that stripper. Here is what I actually ended up with.




I think it will end up working pretty well. Seems to be "the good stuff." I will take necessary precautions. I have a good pair of chemical gloves.
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post #18 of 25 Old 06-23-2013, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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This is what the table looks like.



It's not solid, but I would assume each of those pieces would be more than 1/16" thick, wouldn't that be an accurate assumption?
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post #19 of 25 Old 06-24-2013, 06:39 AM
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This is what the table looks like.



It's not solid, but I would assume each of those pieces would be more than 1/16" thick, wouldn't that be an accurate assumption?
The more I look at that table top. the more it looks like a flooring product. I've even seen vinyl flooring tiles that looks similar to that.






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post #20 of 25 Old 06-24-2013, 07:11 AM
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This is what the table looks like.



It's not solid, but I would assume each of those pieces would be more than 1/16" thick, wouldn't that be an accurate assumption?
It may very well be flooring. I've refinished tables before that were flooring however most were just veneered to look like that. I would expect it to be 1/16" or more in thickness.

I think your choice for for remover is better. I've never use the Crown brand stripper however I've used other products Crown makes. At least it is a semi-paste remover. Working stripper by hand it's always better to use a semi-paste remover as it doesn't evaporate as fast and will cling to vertical surfaces. Like I said earlier keep the remover wet. If you let it dry it will quit working and the finish will dry back on. The most important step though is when you start lifting the finish off. It needs to be done fast and get the residue off before the stuff drys back on.
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