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post #1 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 05:26 PM Thread Starter
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Working With Plywood

I am a novice at woodworking, but have done many DIY projects like benches and small tables. I am attempting a DIY daybed frame on the cheap. I have a $100 budget for this project and want it to be extremely simple without any fancy tools other than my drill, glue, and screws. What I plan to do is use 2 sheets of 3/4" plywood glued and screwed together for the base and then stack 2x4's for the arms and then screw in Waddell legs on the bottom of the base. I have only used plywood in the past for art projects and a table top.

I am unsure of how much weight 2 sheets of plywood would hold (I plan to use 6 legs, including a two center ones for stability). I would ideally like this sofa to hold two people of average size - 250-400 lbs. total with a twin mattress (don't know how much they weigh). I have been doing some research on plywood vs. solid wood as a base and many DIY-ers think plywood is a good choice based on strength and cost.

So I have two questions: one, would two sheets of plywood hold up to 400 lbs and two, would there really be much of a difference between using PureBond ply vs. generic sanded ply. I have read reviews of PureBond ply over at Home Depot and many people say it's not worth the $50 a sheet. What if I used HD's sanded 3/4" ply that costs about $30 a sheet. Is there really a difference in strength?

Thanks for any help!:smile3:
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post #2 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 05:58 PM
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I found this to be very informative.


http://homeguides.sfgate.com/plywood...ths-99591.html

RLTW!
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post #3 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 06:06 PM
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A sketch of what you are planning would be most helpful. Strength is going to heavily depend upon your arrangement of 2x4 and leg placement. Will you be using box springs under the mattress?

George
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post #4 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 06:35 PM
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How much of a span are you talking about. Doubled plywood is very strong but that much weight we need to know how far the span it.

Purebond plywood is pretty good but you have to be careful when you buy it. You know plywood is multiple layers of veneer and on their plywood if there is a knot hole in the layer below the outside veneer they don't bother to fix it. Used to plywood manufacturers would put a boat patch on a spot like that. With Purebond it's just a hollow spot which you can't see when you buy it. The outer veneer is very thin and when you finish or paint it the veneer wrinkles up making an ugly spot. What I will do is go over the sheet and tap my fingernails on the sheet and listen for hollow spots.
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post #5 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
How much of a span are you talking about. Doubled plywood is very strong but that much weight we need to know how far the span it.

Purebond plywood is pretty good but you have to be careful when you buy it. You know plywood is multiple layers of veneer and on their plywood if there is a knot hole in the layer below the outside veneer they don't bother to fix it. Used to plywood manufacturers would put a boat patch on a spot like that. With Purebond it's just a hollow spot which you can't see when you buy it. The outer veneer is very thin and when you finish or paint it the veneer wrinkles up making an ugly spot. What I will do is go over the sheet and tap my fingernails on the sheet and listen for hollow spots.
By span, I assume you mean the length and width? The daybed would be 39"x79" with four inches of that dedicated to the 2x4's for arms.

I actually just watched a few youtube videos on purebond vs. the cheap chinese stuff and I'm going to go with the purebond,

Last edited by Jordan Dior; 12-09-2017 at 07:08 PM.
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post #6 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 07:32 PM
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79" is too long to hold 400 pounds. With that much span you really need to incorporate steel.

I stopped using Chinese plywood more then 15 years ago. I kept having trouble with it delaminating. There is another plywood called sande plywood which is a good material. It's cheaper than purebond. It has a grain more like mahogany but is nearly white in color.
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post #7 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
79" is too long to hold 400 pounds. With that much span you really need to incorporate steel.

I stopped using Chinese plywood more then 15 years ago. I kept having trouble with it delaminating. There is another plywood called sande plywood which is a good material. It's cheaper than purebond. It has a grain more like mahogany but is nearly white in color.
Really? That stinks. The thing is there are a few youtube videos of how to build a sofa frame from plywood and from what they show it looks like it holds up. Would regular lumber boards/slats propped up with 2x4's underneath hold up to 400 pounds instead?
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 09:55 PM
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It's just a characteristic of wood to bow and sag. Even with nothing on it gravity would make the plywood sag with a 79" span. If you put a 2x4 edgewise under the plywood or glued to the edge of the plywood that would hold it.
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post #9 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 10:01 PM
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A sketch or link of what you are trying to do would be helpful


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-09-2017, 10:59 PM
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If you added a center brace with legs instead of a 79 span it would reduce down to less than 40 span.
This would make a very big difference for handling a load.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #11 of 11 Old 12-11-2017, 10:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jordan Dior View Post
I am a novice at woodworking, but have done many DIY projects like benches and small tables. I am attempting a DIY daybed frame on the cheap. I have a $100 budget for this project and want it to be extremely simple without any fancy tools other than my drill, glue, and screws. What I plan to do is use 2 sheets of 3/4" plywood glued and screwed together for the base and then stack 2x4's for the arms and then screw in Waddell legs on the bottom of the base. I have only used plywood in the past for art projects and a table top.

I am unsure of how much weight 2 sheets of plywood would hold (I plan to use 6 legs, including a two center ones for stability). I would ideally like this sofa to hold two people of average size - 250-400 lbs. total with a twin mattress (don't know how much they weigh). I have been doing some research on plywood vs. solid wood as a base and many DIY-ers think plywood is a good choice based on strength and cost.

So I have two questions: one, would two sheets of plywood hold up to 400 lbs and two, would there really be much of a difference between using PureBond ply vs. generic sanded ply. I have read reviews of PureBond ply over at Home Depot and many people say it's not worth the $50 a sheet. What if I used HD's sanded 3/4" ply that costs about $30 a sheet. Is there really a difference in strength?

Thanks for any help!:smile3:
If plywood is make 1 1\2" and supported with a 2 x 4 mid bridge (side to side and front to back ) it's plenty supportive for 400#. Now you $100 budget with today's lumber prices, I'm thinking that $100 may be lite in cost. Tom

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