Woodworking in the spring - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 03-10-2010, 02:35 PM Thread Starter
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Woodworking in the spring

I am fairly new to woodworking and have never really had to concern myself with temperature and humidity as I worked in a climate controlled garage in AZ up until now. What do I need to be concerned with as the weather gets nice enough in MN to start working in my barn? Can I still joint/plane and glue wood in 45 degrees and not have any trouble when I bring a piece into the warmth of the house? If not what do I need to do to start getting a jump on summer projects? The wood has been air drying for 20 years if that helps.
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post #2 of 11 Old 03-10-2010, 11:54 PM
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I think you should invest in some type of heat source, 45 degrees is a little to cool.

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post #3 of 11 Old 03-11-2010, 12:55 PM
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Moisture in the summer, you don't say how open your barn is, but you can expect RUST on your table surfaces and the moisture content in cured stock to rise enough to possibly cause problems with later shrinkage.

I'm from NE, I work out of my basement and have a dehumidifier running most of the yr.
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post #4 of 11 Old 03-11-2010, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
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I am planning to enclose the shop and insulate/heat it later on this summer. I suppose it wouldn't be a bad idea to do it now. I'd like to put in a concrete floor but I think I may just be putting in a footing around the edge to get a secure support base for the walls and go in and put a full floor in later when I can afford it.
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post #5 of 11 Old 03-12-2010, 08:43 AM
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I am fairly new to woodworking and have never really had to concern myself with temperature and humidity as I worked in a climate controlled garage in AZ up until now. What do I need to be concerned with as the weather gets nice enough in MN to start working in my barn? Can I still joint/plane and glue wood in 45 degrees and not have any trouble when I bring a piece into the warmth of the house? If not what do I need to do to start getting a jump on summer projects? The wood has been air drying for 20 years if that helps.
You can plane your wood, but gluing and jointing is probably out of the question. Even though the wood has air dried for twenty years, it will still have more moisture in it than it will after being in a heated house for a few months. The wood that you want use should go into the house to acclimatize to the conditions where it will be once utilized or you will probably end up with warping, twisting, cracking and splitting.
A moisture meter would help you out. If the wood has stabilized to the same moisture content as wood that has been in the house for a long time you are pretty safe.

Once you have insulated and heated your barn, so that you can more or less duplicate the house conditions you should be able to finish your wood projects fairly successfully.

Gerry
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post #6 of 11 Old 03-12-2010, 12:14 PM
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Nurumkin,
If and when, seriously consider a moisture barrier below the barn's concrete floor. Not sure whether required in your area for barns but if you're going to seal the interior off from the outside to use as a shop it will server you well regarding your tools
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post #7 of 11 Old 03-12-2010, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys I think I will just get the walls up with a concrete footer like I was thinking for now but set it up with class 5 so that when I decide to pour a floor later I can easily, I will protect the bottoms of my tolls with a few sheets of plywood for now and run a dehumidifier for the summer to keep it where I want it.

Second question I was thinking about combining my shop with the dog kennel. Basically I was going to put an insulated doggy door to the outside and throw a couch in the corner for them. Has anyone done this or have any comments on how well it would work. The dogs are good dogs and not going to damage my stuff but would an insulated doggy door leak out all my heat or let in too much humidity for the dehumidifier?
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post #8 of 11 Old 03-12-2010, 04:54 PM
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Thanks guys I think I will just get the walls up with a concrete footer like I was thinking for now but set it up with class 5 so that when I decide to pour a floor later I can easily, I will protect the bottoms of my tolls with a few sheets of plywood for now and run a dehumidifier for the summer to keep it where I want it.



Second question I was thinking about combining my shop with the dog kennel. Basically I was going to put an insulated doggy door to the outside and throw a couch in the corner for them. Has anyone done this or have any comments on how well it would work. The dogs are good dogs and not going to damage my stuff but would an insulated doggy door leak out all my heat or let in too much humidity for the dehumidifier?
Dust for dog's is no good I heard that if you use spanish ceder that can kill a dog Some one told me this The dust is so fine You should have some way to get dust out My take on this As far as a dog door It is smaller than the door that you will be going out and in ? Don't thank that would be anything to worry about
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post #9 of 11 Old 03-12-2010, 06:48 PM
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I'd also worry about a bored pup or dog chewing on plugged cords. I have wall outlets but becausew my shop is so small I gotta move tools around just to move tools around so I also have 115v and 230v floating outlets both reach most of my shop.
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post #10 of 11 Old 03-13-2010, 08:42 AM
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A well constructed dog door shouldn't lose too much heat. But the concern about dust is a valid one. Perhaps you could build a small insulated room in the barn for the dogs to go into when you are making dust, and let them join you when you are doing work that doesn't create a lot of dust.

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post #11 of 11 Old 03-13-2010, 03:39 PM Thread Starter
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that is a good point about the dust. I would have a collection system but I'd hate to have them getting sick.
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